Painting joists in the basement

This is probably not the right group for this, but I decided to ask anyway since a lot of people here know wood very well. I have a Boris Karloff basement, one of those with stone walls, exposed joists, spider webs, and - unfortunately- some mold. We tackled the mold last week. I am going to paint the stone walls with anti-somethingorother paint. I was thinking of also putting a coat on the overhead joists. Would that cause any problems in the long run ? I would put on only one coat, so I assume that that, plus all of the cracks, gaps, etc will still let vapor pass through.
thanks...
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It will brighten things up. Think about getting a sprayer if it is the older rough cut lumber.
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On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 02:20:01 GMT, "RE Quick Transit"

Oh yeah: it's a Boris Karloff basement, with stone walls, spider webs, old dimension roug-cut lumber, a coal bin, etc.
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wrote:

be a shame to brighten it up too much.
have you considered installing a pipe organ in it? maybe a few *really* creaky old doors, too.
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On Tue, 26 Oct 2004 22:46:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

We've got the creaky doors. How about a piano ? We've got one upstairs that we're thinking of getting rid of. I figure if I detune a dozen keys or so, and maybe break one or two, iit would fit right in.
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You can make things worse by trapping moisture under the paint. How about something porus, maybe whitewash. I'd use clear copper naphthanate if possible, but I'm not sure about its fumes.
Hopefully you'll get some ventilation. A dehumidifier will help too, as will a membrane on the floor, if it's not slabbed.
Wilson

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wrote:

I'll lokk into it, thanks.
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Zinesser makes a paint for materials exposed to dampness. I think it is an acrylic latex and is guaranteed to prevent mold for 5 years +. JG
GregP wrote:

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Generally speaking latex paints are permeable to water vapor. The wood still 'breathes' and if water gets in to the wood through an unpainted surface, like from above on a joist, it can evaporate through the paint. That assumes the water only gets in rarely.
Many years ago my Dad had me paint the joists and subfloor in our basement ceiling. It made a tremendous difference in terms of brightening the laundry room and workshop. He had me wipe the joists with a damp rag so that, in addition ot cleaning them, the surface would be moistened and would not soak up quite so much paint. The latex paint we used stuck well. I do not remember the brand
A latex paint made especially for damp locations should be perfect for your need.
--

FF

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Paint can trap mold and moisture. Is whitewash porus> Wilson

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