OT: Water heater question

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Here's a better one to check: http://tinyurl.com/mzlbfbg
Tells how it operates.
Note that there appears to be 2 types of "hybrid" - electric that uses outside (of the water heater) air, and this one which is gas powered and "hybrid" of tank and tankless plus high-efficiency.
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One thing that hasn't been taken into consideration is the hardness of the water.
Hard water can plug up piping components when heated.
A water softener can do wonders.
Just got to keep feeding salt pellets.
Lew
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On Thursday, July 10, 2014 3:13:53 PM UTC-5, Gramps' shop wrote:

place. Any of you have experience with a tankless system? How fast does a tankless system deliver hot water?

As to your question. Like some of the others, we used one in Europe. We a lso have a small one in our shed. The real question is, "How are you going to power it? Gas or electricity?" If you go gas, you will get a better f low through (higher volume at higher temps). If you go electricity, you wi ll need a very large breaker and service. The one in our shed is, as I sai d, a small one and uses a 60 amp breaker and wire for the same.
Where it me, I would go tankless, but gas, if I could. If not, you might s eriously consider putting a unit near the sources of use. (i.e., if you ha ve two bathrooms, put a small one near the secondary bathroom and a larger one for the utility room, kitchen and other bathroom.)
Short term, a replacement water heater might be cheaper. Long term, the ta nkless will pay for itself.
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As always, a thoughtful and helpful discussion. The comments from Karl and Robert were particularly helpful. I've decided to stay with the tank, but will downsize to 50 gals as it's just the two of us plus the dogs (and they don't use hot water).
Larry
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Heated or not hard water plugs pipes and valves equally. Think about the shut off valve to your toilet. We had no water softener at our house for the first 20 years that we lived in the house, new when we bought. I turned the water off at the main valve because the shut off valves at the toilets were crusty and difficult to close when replacing toilet valve parts. Two years after installing a water softener the shut off valves worked like new. As a bonus I did not have to replace the toilet valves as often after installing the softener. And the faucets and drains no longer had to be cleaned to remove the white mineral deposits.

In many ways, use less soap too.

Not that big of a deal. If I did not water my yard with softened water I probably would have to put in 3-4 bags a year. As it is I do that twice a year. Our first softener was a Culligan softener that regenerated twice a week. That was way way way too often. In our new house I bought a different brand softener that measures water flow and regenerates after somewhere around 3,000 gal. IIRC. So instead of 8 times a month it is now only 1-2 times a month when I am not watering the yard.

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