OT - Sen-Sen

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On Fri, 2 Mar 2007 14:00:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Cracker Barrel restaurants carry a number of those products. I know I've seen Blackjack gum there. They also have Stewart's Orange soda -- yum!
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Fri, Mar 2, 2007, 2:26pm (EST-2) snipped-for-privacy@hadenough.com (Mark&Juanita) doth sayeth: Cracker Barrel restaurants carry a number of those products. I know I've seen Blackjack gum there. They also have Stewart's Orange soda -- yum!
Alas, I'll probably never find out then. I've only eaten at Cracker Barrel a couple of times, had about the worst prepared food I've ever ran across. I don't tcare to try them again.
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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On Sat, 3 Mar 2007 10:14:33 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

You don't need to eat there, just go into their store front, find the Blackjack gum and buy it without even going into the restaurant.
The Cracker Barrels around here are pretty good, I'm surprised to hear that they don't measure up in other places.
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J T wrote:

You said it!

Ah, yes, fabulous wealth for a youngster. Recall walking into the suburban town we lived in circa 1955 and using net-type shopping bags like my grandmother carried. Walk was only about 3/4 mi but generally you could fill up two bags with both the quart bottles and smaller bottles. Wasn't unusual to score a buck's worth of deposits at the local liquor store which, conveniently, was on end of the business district closest to my home<g>. Talk about rolling in the clover<g>

Black Jack gum's available from the same link that had all the other candy, etc. I still see it now and then as a "special" at certain stores - seen it (and other vintage candies) at, of all places, The Hobby Lobby stores.

Pretty common stuff. You can find it at most any good liquor store or food store.

Y'know, that's one thing that's kinda odd. The price of .22s really has been remarkably stable. I don't think they've even doubled in price since I started buying them in the late 50's. If you shop carefully you can still buy a brick of 500 for ~ $10-$12 (long rifles at that, IIRC)

Don't recall the former and you'll never see the latter. Not politically correct, don'tcha know<g>

Yeppers. While on board ship in the late 60's we had the Coke in the 8oz bottles. We'd be playing cards and such and just grab a bottle. Always in a betting mood, guy with the bottle closest to our present location would pay for the round.
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Sat, Mar 3, 2007, 12:36pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net (UnquestionablyConfused) doth sayeth: <snip> The price of .22s really has been remarkably stable. I don'tthink they've even doubled in price since I started buying them in the late 50's. If you shop carefully you can still buy a brick of 500 for ~ $10-$12 (long rifles at that, IIRC) <snip>
THE .22 ammo of choice was always Winchester Super-X, everyone knew it was more powerful. You only bought another brand when the Super-Xs were sold out. Seems to me you could even buy single rounds too. Don't remember the exact price but know it was around 50 cents a box of 50 - which would make it around $5 for a brick of 500 - I only recall ONE of those being bought. I just DAGS and a brick of Super-X can be got for $19.77, not including shipping, about four times increase. That's for solid points, hollow points are a bit higher. Nowadays for plinking I usually get the cheapest I can find. For accuracy I'm willing to go higher tha the Super-X priceing. Nothing quite like a day spent knocking tin cans around with a .22. Nowadays, if you can even find a place to shoot, seems like someone is bound to bitch about the "noise".
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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On Sat, 03 Mar 2007 12:36:08 GMT, Unquestionably Confused
... snip

... back in those days, one could buy the rifle for not much more than that (or so I've been told, repeatedly ;-) )

Yeah, unfortunately. Those candy cigarrettes used to be a favorite. Not because of the fact they were pretend ciggy's, but because I liked the flavor of them. ... and no, I never was ever tempted to start smoking even though we had candy cigarettes and people on TV smoked; somehow, we were smarter than that.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

I bought my kid brother a .22 single shot at Monkey Wards back around 1968 for something less than $35.
As for JOAT and his high falutin' Super-X... Well, sure you can spend more but even today (and I just just checked) I can buy Remington Thunderbolt .22 LR for $1.19 a box at Farm & Fleet. That's regular price. Even buying 10 boxes to make a brick that's only $11.90 and I know they're cheaper when sold as a brick. I don't recall them being as cheap in the early to mid-60's as JOAT does. I was thinking along the lines of $0.60-$0.75 a box for shorts, maybe a dime more for longs and long rifles still under a buck.
But you're right, JOAT, one could sure have a ball with a couple boxes of .22 cartridges. Last time I really kicked loose with some .22s was out in Oklahoma circa 1970. Vacationing and visiting a friend. Her father took us out to the family farm and they had a half acre "stock tank" which we call a pond back in Illinois. Pond had water moccasins and other vermin aplenty. We had a brick of .22's and semi-autos. Great way to spend an afternoon.
Not quite as much fun as "plinking" with fully suppressed H&K MP5 with sub-sonic rounds but close<g>

Yeah, they did have a rather unique flavor, didn't they? I still like Ju-Ju-Be's (Sp?) Kinda tricky finding the ones that taste like the originals. They're out there but there seems to be some fluctuation in the recipe. Some taste like the originals, others are just too sweet.
Ah, the trials of life!
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On Sun, 04 Mar 2007 00:26:05 GMT, Unquestionably Confused

Was thinking of my granddad telling us about buying boxes of ammo for 10 cents and a good rifle for $15 to $20. (Think that was in the 30's though)
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Sun, Mar 4, 2007, 12:26am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net (UnquestionablyConfused) doth sayeth: <snip> As for JOAT and his high falutin' Super-X... Well, sure you canspend more but even today (and I just just checked) I can buy Remington Thunderbolt .22 LR for $1.19 a box at Farm & Fleet. That's regular price. Even buying 10 boxes to make a brick that's only $11.90 and I know they're cheaper when sold as a brick. I don't recall them being as cheap in the early to mid-60's as JOAT does. <snip> But you're right, JOAT, one could sure have a ball with a couple boxes of .22 cartridges. Last time I really kicked loose with some .22s was out in Oklahoma circa 1970. <snip> Not quite as much fun as "plinking" with fully suppressed H&K MP5 with sub-sonic rounds but close<g>
Yeah, that's great plinking ammo, but you don't get real accuracy with that stuff. And the prices I was stating weren't from the mid '60s, rather mid '50s era.
The last time I really had a chance to do some really good .22 shooting was probably around 1980. Shooting at about 100 yards and my neighbor was using a scoped rifle. He got a bit miffed because I was outshooting him with a open-sighted High Standard Victor. Sure wish I had that now, but got stolen some years back. Got it while I was in Ft hood. The indoor range was about a block or two from my work and i used to go there on my luch you. They supplied weapons, or you could take your own, .22 only, and they'd let you hve 50 free rounds a day. Nice way to take a break.
I got ahold of an M2 carbine in Nam. POS full auto, usually jammed by the thrird round, but on semi it was totally reliable. Put a load of ammo thru it, and got good enough I could usually hit a soda can at 50 feet by at least the second shot, and then kept it moving - firing from the hip. Like I said, I put a LOT of ammo thru it. It was fun but I loved my M14.
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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Damn, almost forot some of the best stuff.
Lunch break, mid winter, and walking about 14 mile to the store, buying licorice whips, about 2 feet long, the cold freezing them on the way back, and breaking off pieces to eat.
Getting dropped off at the movie theater, for the Saturday matinee, for an hour of really good cartoons, the next episode of the serial, and uaualy a western that was probably a pretty bad movie, with enough money for the ticket, a drink, and a little candy. Life was good.
That movie theater has gone thru any number of changes, and I think now that it's been restored and is a movie theater again.
I remember the really big tootsie rolls too. There were separated into segments. Now all I see are the bags of the small pieces. Damn it, I'd like to have one of those big ones, where I could bite off a piece, wrap it up and save the rest for later. Some people always want to mess with success.
I remember mking rock candy at home too, with the string in sugar water. And pulling taffy once or twice - OK, but not worth the effort as far as I'm ncerned. I remember popcorn balls too, even getting them on halloween. And crackerjack for a nickle a box, with a neat price inside - it's still around, just more pricey, only now seems like the "prizes" are just something printed on paper.
JOAT When in doubt, go to sleep. - Mully Small
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My neighbourhood candy store was also the source for my first cigarettes. They had singles of a really cheap brand and they were awful. But, they were good enough to get a nice little addiction out of them. Same little store: candy cigarettes genever condoms
everything for a boy's rites of passage.
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I also remember putting a quarter in a cigarette machine for a pack of Lucky Strike ( remember those?) and getting a pack with two pennies inside the wrapper AND a pack of matches.
JT - licorice has always been my favorite also - remember the licorice "pipes" and "cigars" they uses to have? Loved those.
And I won't go into the embarrassment of going into a drugstore to buy condoms and getting a lady clerk who knew my family - talk about rites of passage.
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Fri, Mar 2, 2007, 7:53pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (VicBaron) doth query: <snip> JT - licorice has always been my favorite also - remember thelicorice "pipes" and "cigars" they uses to have? Loved those. <snip>
Ah, yes, now I do. Always seems just a bit "off" in taste tho. Maybe they added something to let 'em keep their shape. The licorice whips, way longer than the imitations today, had the best taste. They'd get like a piece of rope in hot weather, and stiff enough to snape into pieces in cold.
Another of my favorites, were the malted milk balls. Nothing like the lame chocolate covered imitations to today, these were solid bals, no covering, and tasted absolutely wonderful. I remember the first ones I had were when I visited the doctor and he would give me one before I left. Haven't seen any of those in probably 50 years. Anyone know if they're still around? Ah, doesn't matter, the taste has probably been changed even it they are.
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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(Vic Baron) doth query: <snip> JT - licorice has always been my favorite also - remember thelicorice "pipes" and "cigars" they uses to have? Loved those. <snip>
Ah, yes, now I do. Always seems just a bit "off" in taste tho. Maybe they added something to let 'em keep their shape. The licorice whips, way longer than the imitations today, had the best taste. They'd get like a piece of rope in hot weather, and stiff enough to snape into pieces in cold.
The licorice ropes are still being made, 2 or 3 feet long. The candy cigaretts and pipes are still being made but I haven't seen them in stores for a long time but the web site that the OP posted for the sen sen sells a lot of the obscure candy.
--
Roger Shoaf
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Roger Shoaf wrote:
> The licorice ropes are still being made, 2 or 3 feet long.
My customer probably has 80% of the US market.
Manufacturing located in the SF Bay area along with a lot of other candy manufacturing companies.
Fun to watch it being extruded, cut to length, and packaged.
I'm a red guy myself. Never acquired a taste for the black.
Lew
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Would that be the American Licorice Co. in Union city or Freemont?
I used to drive a truck and I hauled several truckloads of their product.
My preference is for the red, but I like the black also. I remember getting a big tub of the red one time and every time I would walk by the table I would grab several of them without thinking too much about it. The next day I had a bit of a worry when I noticed the color of my discharge was rather red. At first I was thinking I was bleeding down there until I realized that it was all of the red licorice I ate the day before.
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Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Roger Shoaf wrote:
> > Would that be the American Licorice Co. in Union city or Freemont?
Yes, headquarters in somewhere around Chicago.
Lew
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Sat, Mar 3, 2007, 11:06am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@nospamsyix.com (RogerShoaf) doth sayteth: The licorice ropes are still being made, 2 or 3 feet long. The candy cigaretts and pipes are still being made but I haven't seen them in stores for a long time but the web site that the OP posted for the sen sen sells a lot of the obscure candy.
The original poster has not taken time yet to look at all of the site. And one of the last things he needs is candy. The reason I know is because that's me But I'm willcheck it out and buy some anyway.
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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Fri, Mar 2, 2007, 11:42am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@topworks.ca (Robatoy) doth sayeth: <snip> everything for a boy's rites of passage. No chew? And my rites of passage included some first class moonshine, around 120 proof, aged in the jar..
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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"Vic Baron" wrote in message

We got our first in '52 ... remember the gray scale "Indian Chief" brightness/contrast adjustment screen that was on 20 hours a day?
Before we got one, a local furniture stores had one in their window that we used to stop at after driving in to buy the obligatory Saturday night ice cream cones. Half the town would be there on the sidewalk watching.
How times have changed since the camel stuck his nose under the tent.
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