OT: Replace plywood flooring: Perfect tool

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You're probably right about general use. It wound up being really handy the other night as we were working on the model railroad. It was compact enough to get into the area we needed it to and quite efficient at cutting the board that was in the way.
I can see it being useful later as we try to cut the old Homasote out while leaving as much of the existing scenery as possible. A circular saw would require 1 1/4" minimum clearance, but that miniature saw requires only about 1/2" or so.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

Yeah but - a 4" grinder is just as compact if not more so, a diamond wheel cuts faster than the Saw Max wheels, a 4" grinder is cheaper (even if you buy a good quality one like a Makita), and a 4" grinder can be used for a lot of things a Saw Max can't do.
Suffice to say I regret spending money on the Saw Max. It's in it's box somewhere in the back of the shop, and I doubt it will ever come out again.
(for those not familiar with it, the Saw Max is basically a 4" grinder with a circular saw style shoe. To quote the late Lew Hodgett, it's overpriced and under-peckered)
John
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On 6/23/16 9:52 AM, John McCoy wrote:

I would disagree. I have one and it's one of the best purchased I've made. The thing cuts through tile like butter and works great against a straightedge.
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-MIKE-

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wrote:

Floor or wall? What sort of blade?
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On 6/23/16 9:44 PM, krw wrote:

I've used the diamond blade to cut back tile on a floor, against a straight edge which worked very well. I also have a 4" grinder with a diamond blade which which I'm fairly skillful as using to cut corners in tile using just my hands. I find the depth stop and fence on the Saw Max to be very useful and effective.
I've also used the drywall blade to cut a very straight lines through drywall, using the shop-vac attachment which was as satisfactory as capturing gypsum dust can possibly get.
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wrote:

Thanks. I have a wet saw but it doesn't do everything. I've been trying to figure out how to do more complicated cuts. I'll take a look.

I haven't had to cut long lines through drywall. Interesting that there is an attachment for it. I'll have to look into it more.
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On 6/24/16 7:22 PM, krw wrote:

For tiling work, the wet saw is the work horse, but my 4-1/2" Snap-On angle grinder with a dry cut diamond blade is the cats meow for cutting out outlet box holes in the center of tiles and cement backer board. -BR
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On 6/22/2016 2:22 PM, Michael wrote:

You probobably will not use it daily or as much as a drill. I look at as the tool that do what no other tool can do and a real problem solver with minimal destruction. Like Swingman I would go corded as batteries will be a constant expense and likely will not have the charge you need when you need it.

I cannot answer that but probably not a whole lot. I would however steer clear of brands that are not known for quality tools. Some cheaper models scream, noisy, and do not hold the attachments securely. Those are ok for limited use but are not usually a pleasure to use. I would use one of those as a last resort.
I would look at DeWalt, Makita, Bosch, maybe even Dremel, basically brands not exclusive to a particular bargain basement store.
If you can at all demo one I wold recommend that. While Fein may be a bit to pricey for you most WoodCraft stores sell them and you can demo them in the store.
I would look for corded, ease of changing attachments, and those that have a way of securely holding the attachments so that they do not slip.
I bought my Fein before anyone else offered a clone and I would prefer the latest tool-less model so that you don't have to keep up with that.
Now that there is competition Fein has dropped the price of their $35~$65 blades and other brands are offered that will fit many different brands tools.

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"Michael" wrote in message

I'd use a circular saw set to just cut the plywood. Remove the nails/screws holding it to the joists first or risk breaking the teeth on the blade!
If you have the finish flooring removed from the room you might be better off replacing a larger area of the sub-flooring... this as a patch that just spans the two joists near the toilet would tend to flex excessively whereas a piece tied into other joists spreads the load better and is more rigid. Also, make sure you orient the face grain on the plywood across the joists and not parallel to the joists.
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On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 3:14:42 PM UTC-5, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Great point, John. I'm also going to install tile so it's probably a good idea to cut a larger piece so there's no movement behind the 1/4 tile backer.
Yes, any excuse to buy a new tool!
Thanks for the info, Swingman! I think I'll go with the DeWalt. It's in my price range and I've always had good luck with the brand.
Mike
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On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 3:19:38 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

Did some work for my brother, needed a multi-tool. He bought the Dewalt (cordless) and gave it to me when done. I like it, use it often.
I have no experience with any other brand.... other than a Stryker cast saw.
Sonny
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On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 3:14:42 PM UTC-5, John Grossbohlin wrote:

John,
Here's another question if you have a moment. If the flooring is particle board, will that have to be replaced with plywood, or can you nail tile backer to particle board. If it needs to be replaced with plywood, what is the minimum width? 1/2 inch?
Thanks!
Mike
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Michael wrote:

Am I overlooking something? Why would anyone want particle board in such a water-vulnerable location?
Bill

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Well, plywood will rot and swell too, but more than likely the sub for is OSB, not particle board.
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On Saturday, July 2, 2016 at 7:37:51 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I'm sorry. That's right. It's OSB. Is this insufficient for nailing down tile backer board?
Thanks,
Mike
Mike
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On 7/2/2016 7:55 AM, Michael wrote:

And I cannot answered your question with any authority. I am not sure if you would even use backer board on a floor.
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On 7/2/16 9:27 AM, Leon wrote:

replaced this process for most tilers. The cement soaks in the water that gets under the tile, without expanding.
Schluter-DITRA underlayment is the best of all worlds in my opinion. It can be put down straight on a wood subfloor without raising the overall height of the floor very much, plus it allows for movement in a saggy floor without cracking the tile or mortar base.
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On 7/2/2016 11:07 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Mortar based demolition _always_ results in upcharge in my remodel bids ...
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On 7/2/16 12:15 PM, Swingman wrote:

I learned that once and never needed another lesson. :-)
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On 7/2/16 10:07 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

I fully agree. Ditra is fantastic. I use it under all my installs except for cement backer board. It is pricey, but check online and buy the big rolls if you have future tiling projects that will need it. Tiling over a fresh concrete slab without some form of isolation membrane is asking for future problems.
-BR
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