OT: Plumbing with Pex!

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Lines don't always drain and anti-freeze is the only way to insure they don't freeze in low spots. This is the same for lawn watering systems.
------------- "FrozenNorth" wrote in message Why even put anti freeze in the lines, turn the water off at the main, and just drain the lines, especially easy if there is a basement sink.
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Froz...


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"m II" wrote in message
Lines don't always drain and anti-freeze is the only way to insure they don't freeze in low spots. This is the same for lawn watering systems.
One advantage I may have missed someone mention is how much more quickly the hot water arrives at the intended faucet. I had our small, rural San Antonio-area home-away-from home re-plumbed with PEX last year and the time from water heater to kitchen is about a fourth of the minute plus it used to take to travel the 35 or 40 feet. And, I do mean HOT.
Dave in Houston
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Yeah, it must have much worse thermal conductivity than copper (but then, most things do!) - I can happily touch the hot water pipes here in the bathroom, but the central heating pipes (copper) are too hot to touch.
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On 2/20/2012 8:39 AM, Dave In Texas wrote:

That is directly attributable to the inexpensive ease with which you can use PEX to effect a "manifold system" with "home run" plumbing, either at the source, or in areas or zones.
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On 2/20/2012 9:36 AM, Swingman wrote:

I suspect that with traditional pipe when everything t's off a central pipe it probably mixes in the cold water from all of those other pipes.
I would also think a cold metallic pipe would absorb much of the heat from the water. The pex probably changes temperature quickly.
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On 2/20/12 8:39 AM, m II wrote:

Draining the lines and leaving taps open leaves plenty of room for expansion for whatever little water remains.
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On 2/20/2012 9:29 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:

But those lines will still freeze and may prevent you from using the pluming until it thaws.
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On 2/20/12 12:05 PM, Leon wrote:

Agreed, but it beats damaged plumbing. :-)
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On 2/20/2012 11:15 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:

That is correct. ;~)
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On 2/20/12 7:39 AM, m II wrote:

Ironically, one of the advantages of Pex is the ability to freeze with water without breaking. I don't remember the scenario which brought about this particular tangent of discussion, but the pipe used was certainly not Pex pipe.
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On 2/20/2012 10:54 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Not to mention that frozen water "in low spots" in a "drained" system is generally not an issue with causing pipes to burst because there is room for expansion due to the draining.
That said, PEX will definitely burst if frozen. It just has the ability, due to its flexibility, to absorb some of the expansion, inherent in freezing water, that causes rigid pipe to burst.
Needless to say, you don't want to push that limited ability too far. ;)
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On Mon, 20 Feb 2012 01:41:29 -0800 (PST), David Paste

I would at least hope he used the stuff for RV's and not automotive type.
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On 2/19/2012 10:57 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Oddly, it is common practice to fill the lines with antifreeze on motor homes in the winter. I suspect that it is impossible to get "all" of the water out and you flush with fresh water to get the antifreeze out.
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wrote:

I've heard of putting antifreeze in the traps to stop sewer gases but never filling the water lines with it.
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On 02/20/2012 06:49 AM, Nova wrote:

I've never used this as I store my 5th wheel in AZ.
<http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/50-below-rv-antifreeze-gallon/57726
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On 2/20/2012 8:42 AM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

And to be clear, antifreeze and coolant are two different products often sold for automobile cooling systems in the same container. You do not want to put coolant/antifreeze in your drinking water lines.
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That's not done in the -known- universe, is it?
-- The ultimate result of shielding men from folly is to fill the world with fools. -- Herbert Spencer
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Yeah, it is great stuff indeed! I was surprised when I pulled up a few floorboards to move a radiator last time I did some plumbing and found that the water mains supply to the loft was plastic pipe - don't know what brand it was as this must have been done about 40 years ago. The central heating was still copper though.
This winter, the garden tap supply burst on the only section of copper pipe there was (about 6 inches from the water company's plastic supply pipe to the tap itself). Needless to say, this'll be replaced with PEX when it warms up a bit!
I have to admit though, there is a lovely glow of satisfaction to be had from a well-done bit of copper plumbing! And my grandad still doesn't believe anyone has the right to call themselves a plumber unless they know how to properly wipe a lead pipe joint!
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David Paste wrote:

Plumb is latin for lead so he is spot on
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On 2/16/12 6:15 AM, steve robinson wrote:

Car is short for carriage, as in, horseless, but I don't see too many mechanics needing to know how to change broken spokes in wooden wheels. :-)
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