OT: Plumbing with Pex!

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Remodeling the bathrooms sure is a lot of work just to have an excuse to build a couple custom cabinets, but hey.
It's been about 15 years since I built my previous home and had to deal with water supply. I'm using this PEX plastic pipe and some of the SharkBite/GatorBite fittings and valves and may I just say, holy freakin WOW!!! Is this stuff the $h!t or what? Talk about fast and easy.
Now, I'm sure there will be a few of you geezers who will tell me all about the dangers of this newfangled technology, like whoever it was who said they preferred board lumber sub-floors over plywood. I'm still LMAO at that. Whatever. Go chase the kids of your lawn.
Anyway, just had to shout from the rooftops about how easy plumbing water is compared to days gone by.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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to
freakin
who
LMAO
It's probably OK, but I prefer stuff that has been tested over a longer time span.
I bought some grey plastic plumbing tubing for a non-plumbing application about 25 years ago. 10 years ago, I wanted to get some more. I did a search on-line, and all I found was law suits. Not a good sign...
Apparently after about 10 years it got brittle and exploded. It was very popular in RV & mobile homes, and millions of dollars worth of vehicles & homes were severely damaged by the stuff.
We just had our bathroom remodeled, and the bulk of the plumbing was done with copper. The one place they used Pex was to hook a radiator into the hot water heating system. Getting the fittings just the right spacing was a pain in the neck, and using Pex gave them a little leeway. I think we've got about 1 foot total in the house now.
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On 2/15/2012 8:44 PM, Doug White wrote:
as been tested over a longer

PEX has been in use in EU for forty years. While there is no such thing as the "perfect" plumbing material, PEX does have a few drawbacks, but the pluses far outweigh the drawbacks.
One thing about PEX is that it does deteriorate with exposure to sunlight. It also must be protected from rodents. There were some initial connection issues when it was first used in this country due to plumbers not being familiar with the material ... that has been overcome for years now.

It is doubtful what you bought was PEX.

Once again, this was not the product PEX.

That should not concern you in the least, and it will most probably outlast the rest of the plumbing.
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On 2/15/2012 8:44 PM, Doug White wrote:

Sure you did not buy conduit???

Color makes a difference, some of that stuff was used in the wrong application.

And PEX has a relatively long track record.
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The houses in my tract (circa 1970) were plumbed from the street using this grey PVC-like pipe. It deteriorated completely within the first 10 years and had to be replaced at _every_ house (fortunately the interiors were galvy).
scott
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On Feb 16, 5:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Just out of interest, do the houses in North America have their water supply through metal or polyethylene pipes now?
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On 2/16/2012 11:10 AM, David Paste wrote:

Both ... metal is still prevalent in many municipalities' _supply_ lines to the residential cutoff.
CPVC is now very common from the house side of the cutoff in new construction; with a mix of all three (CPVC, galvanized and copper) still in common use.
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 06:48:04 -0600, Leon wrote:

Nope. What he bought was most likely polybutylene.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 2/15/2012 8:02 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

No kidding, and I'm an old geezer, but not one of those. :)
The ease with which you can fabricate a PEX manifold system to do plumbing "home runs", like electricians do with wiring, makes getting both hot and cold to all areas of a home a piece o' cake, and much cheaper, meaning you can put money elsewhere, where it can be seen by the buyer/customer.
Too bad there are still municipalities where you can't use PEX. Like the area I've built most of the homes in the last ten years. ... it's against code here. :(
Still, I use PEX whenever, and wherever, I can.
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On 2/15/12 8:45 PM, Swingman wrote:

I ran the lines to the guest lav and toilet and couldn't believe how easy it was to pull (much, much easier than romex wire). I connected up a T in the line and the stub-outs all using the copper ring crimps and again, couldn't believe how fast and easy. It felt like I was cheating.
If it was copper or CPVC it would've taken me all day to run it under this weird dropped ceiling section of my basement. I have no idea how I would've sweated or glued it, short of tearing the ceiling out.
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The pinch rings for the Watts PEX system sold at HD here are top of the line. Tool is $30, the crimped joints will turn around many turns inside the joint without a drip, can be released easily with a needle nose pliers and sharp screwdriver, and the pinch can be done in a tight corner without the tool needing to be around the ring. Cheap and reliable in the 5 years I have been using them. Never had a leak yet in a house full of them.
Lead free solder doesn't work and I have had several "professional joints" done by 40 year veterans leak already. PEX is always welcome here. Over 4000' of it in my house.
------------ "-MIKE-" wrote in message
On 2/15/12 8:45 PM, Swingman wrote:

I ran the lines to the guest lav and toilet and couldn't believe how easy it was to pull (much, much easier than romex wire). I connected up a T in the line and the stub-outs all using the copper ring crimps and again, couldn't believe how fast and easy. It felt like I was cheating.
If it was copper or CPVC it would've taken me all day to run it under this weird dropped ceiling section of my basement. I have no idea how I would've sweated or glued it, short of tearing the ceiling out.
--

-MIKE-

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Well that's not true. Lead free does work, its just a bitch to work with.
I have sweated a few that have not had a problem in 12 years.
I did try to use the lead free for a 000 welding wire to connector. That didn't work well. Wound up crimping it. But for pipe I have been successful. Just don't heat the joint too much.
On 2/17/2012 4:56 PM, m II wrote:

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On 2/17/12 3:56 PM, m II wrote:

FWIW, I'm using the solid copper rings, not the steel clamps.
--

-MIKE-

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Do you have the push-fit systems with the PEX stuff over there?
http://www.speedfit.co.uk/Home/Technical-Support.aspx
Have a look at a video or two there.
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On 2/18/12 6:15 AM, David Paste wrote:

I've seen something similar looking to those in the stores. Expensive.
--

-MIKE-

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Yeah, but I wonder if a professional plumber could speed up his job as a result to absorb that cost?
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I have never trusted the push fit connectors, Father in law redid an old house using them and when the house was left to freeze over the winter with antifreeze in the pipes the piping pulls out of the fittings and flooded his house when he warmed it up again! Why would I pay that huge expense when the pinch rings are so cheap and the tool so cheap. Several ties I have crimped the PEX to a NPT adapter and then had to screw the MPT into the FPT....no problem.
------------------- "David Paste" wrote in message wrote:

Yeah, but I wonder if a professional plumber could speed up his job as a result to absorb that cost?
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Just out of interest, why did he fill the pipes with anti-freeze rather than just draining down the system and leaving it empty?
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On 2/19/12 8:42 AM, David Paste wrote:

I was thinking the same thing. You'd have to drain the antifreeze, anyway, right?
--

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On 2/19/12 11:57 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Why even put anti freeze in the lines, turn the water off at the main, and just drain the lines, especially easy if there is a basement sink.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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