OT: Ooops! Now What?

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"Doug Miller" wrote:
> The nitrile gloves from Harbor Freight (made in Malaysia, usually) are pretty durable, really. ----------------------------------- Go to a safety supply house and check their glove stock.
It all comes from SE Asia.
Lew
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

----------------------------------- Next time try Go-Jo.
Been using it for probably 50-60 years.
It's been so long I forgot when I first used it.
They started in Akron, OH, don't know if they are still there.
Auto parts stores like Pep Boys have it.
Lew
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

Try Fast Orange next time. Rub it in without water, until the grease is thoroughly loosened up, then wash it off.
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On 2/5/2013 10:15 AM, Casper wrote:

Sand it . works from 220 dry paper on up to 600 wet /dry, with mineral spirits.
--
Jeff

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"Casper" wrote in message
So I made a mistake. Now I have to clean it up and it's not going to be easy so I am looking for suggestions...
In December I got and pin oak burl from a local tree service cutting down a nearby tree. I brought it inside and laid it on a rag on top of my DeWalt scrollsaw, checking it about once a week until the holidays.
I picked it up last night and found a huge rust spot on my scrollsaw. I immediately removed the burl, which is fine, and put some WD40 down on the saw. So far I've treid just WD40 and a scrub pad. Some rust has come off but most has not, even soaking overnight. Anyone have a good way of removing the rust and not damaging the surface? `Casper =========================================================================================================Rust is red. WD-40 and steel wool will remove that in seconds. Rust staining is black. It is totally harmless and is no more than color. If you want to get back to shiny, an abrasive is called for. Start sanding on your table and hope that you don't sand it out of flat. I would remove the rust and be happy.
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On 2/5/2013 7:21 PM, CW wrote:

==========================================================================================================
Actually Empire Top Saver Sill bring it back to shiney with out anything more than the ScotchBrite pad that comes with the product.
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"Leon" wrote in message

==========================================================================================================
Actually Empire Top Saver Sill bring it back to shiney with out anything more than the ScotchBrite pad that comes with the product. ========================================================================================================True, there are chemicals out there that will remove the stain but it seems that it is often recommended (by some on this group, among others) to sand it out, something that I would not do. I would not worry about a stain either as long as the surface is smooth. This comes from a career in a machine shop. Looks are of no concern, accuracy is.
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"CW" wrote in message

Yeah... not terribly different from when people sand out defects on things like table tops without sanding the entire surface to the same plane. Considering how relatively soft cast iron is it's not hard to "unflatten" it by focusing on just the stained area. I saw an example of that in the recent past... the guy cleaned up the surface of an old 4" jointer with a belt sander!
John
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On 2/6/2013 12:03 AM, CW wrote:

=========================================================================================================
This is woodworking and OP's talking about the table on a scrollsaw, not even a TS or a jointer, for heaven's sake.
He's not going to remove enough material w/ a 200+ grit to get to a clean surface (ignoring staining, of course, as I already mentioned earlier) to possibly matter...a fraction of or a mil will be impossible to discern in functionality (as would several mils in reality on a scrollsaw). Getting a jointer table severely out of whack is a different animal, of course...
Precision is good but folks tend to get way over-paranoid on tolerances w/ woodworking--heck, the wood itself will move more than you're talking about here just from the time you mill it before it's assembled not to mention how far it will then go when glue is applied and it soaks up that moisture.
--
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"dpb" wrote in message

To put things ever further into perspective... many of the machines the Shakers used had wooden tables on them... table saws, table saws with sliding tables, cut off saws, thickness planers, reciprocating saws, shapers (a tongue and groove machine comes to mind), and others would be included in the list. It would be fair to say those tools too moved around with changes in humidity and it would be difficult to argue that their products were negatively impacted by the movement.
John
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All true but they were building simple furniture..
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True.
I barely took off anything and when the rusted area was almost down to the level of the rest of the surface, I sanded the entire surface. I got this unit second hand but it's in great, almost new, shape. I doubt the miniscule amount of metal I sanded off will ever make a difference. Now I just have to remember never to oops again.

I get a lot of this from some people. I wanted to make a custom rest for my lathe for some special projects and was telling my neighbor about it. He kept insisting I would have to have it made in a machine shop due to tight tolerances. I tried to explain to him this is a wood lathe and not a metal lathe but he refused to get the idea until the rest was made and he saw how it worked. He never said another word about tolerances after.
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On 2/5/2013 5:21 PM, CW wrote:

==========================================================================================================
In fact, it's that black oxidation/staining that eventually gives old iron tools that beautiful patina.
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"scritch" wrote in message

Which suggests that maybe the solution to the cosmetic problem is to use something like Birchwood Casey gun browning solution... intentionally brown the surface and let regular use burnish the areas that actually get used. ;~)
http://sport.birchwoodcasey.com/Finishing/FinishingDetails.aspx?ProductID 3fa667-ed45-4e20-ba31-b39c418ed211
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