OT: Ooops! Now What?

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So I made a mistake. Now I have to clean it up and it's not going to be easy so I am looking for suggestions...
In December I got and pin oak burl from a local tree service cutting down a nearby tree. I brought it inside and laid it on a rag on top of my DeWalt scrollsaw, checking it about once a week until the holidays.
I picked it up last night and found a huge rust spot on my scrollsaw. I immediately removed the burl, which is fine, and put some WD40 down on the saw. So far I've treid just WD40 and a scrub pad. Some rust has come off but most has not, even soaking overnight. Anyone have a good way of removing the rust and not damaging the surface? `Casper
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Use a sanding block with 220 aluminum oxide paper, lube with light oil, plenty of elbow grease.
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I kept ihitting it with WD40 and a green scour pad but not much came off. Next day, after a few more applications of WD40 soaked into a paper towel, i used a coarse grit Norton sanding block. All rust gone and no pitting! You can see a very faint outline if you look at it from a low side angle but cannot see it otherwise. Good enough for me. Hit it all over with a little more WD (damn can spout works when it wants and can is at least still 65% full) and tomorrow I will wax it.
Thanks for all the tips. I think I will still look into some of the suggested alternatives for other projects. I enjoy finding the occasional old tool and cleaning it up. I keep hoping to find a good but cheap table belt sander. Maybe this summer.
I can't remember when I bought this WD can, but it's been years. It's a large one and works but only at a low angle and clean spray head. Since I can't find a replacement straw to fit it, I may end up donating it to my mechanic.
Thanks all... 'Casper
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Forget the spray cans. If you're going to use WD40, buy it in the gallon tin and use a sprayer. Sure, it's not as direct as the spray can, but you don't wind up wasting what's left when the propellant is gone.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 07 Feb 2013 04:40:52 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Har! I doubt that anyone here has ever thrown away a full depressurized can of anything. We're an inventive lot and would have found several ways to save and use the contents.
Does anyone here NOT have a church key? (I didn't think not. ;)
-- Newman's First Law: It is useless to put on your brakes when you're upside down. --Paul Newman
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I hold a rubber tipped blow gun on my air line pressed into the nozzle of the upside down can. Press down(up) the nozzle while releasing air through the blow gun to re pressurize the can. I do not know if my usual 100psi line pressure might blow up the can, so I only give it a quick blast or two. If it's not enough I can always add more later.
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wrote:

Hmm, that might unsludge a gucked up pickup tube, too, wouldn't it? I'll have to try that some time.
-- Newman's First Law: It is useless to put on your brakes when you're upside down. --Paul Newman
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

If there's any significant quantify of product left but no propellant, take a small punch or nail and poke a hole in the can near the bottom, then pour the product into a pump sprayer or oil can.
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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I don't use WD40 much, ergo why my can is so old. I use Ballistol... http://www.ballistol.com/ which I find to be a better lubricant, rust protectant and bio safe. Sadly it is getting harder to find. I use it on everything except where I need to remove rust.

I have tons of straws around here and not a one will fit this can. I've been through this same conversation with several people, all believing they had a straw to fit, and found out none do. Don't know what the company did with this can, but it sucks.
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On 2/5/13 9:15 AM, Casper wrote:

http://boeshield.com/features-benefits/rustfree /
Using WD-40 and steel wool or any other old-school techniques are time burning distractions. Rustfree is fast and easy. I've tried all the different products and techniques and this is by far the most efficient.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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If there is pitting, that is permanent.
To clean up next to like new and to further protect I find that his product does a very good job.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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Shop the product. Better pricing here.
http://www.wmooreprofiles.com/p-4200-top-saver-kit.aspx
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On 2/5/13 12:42 PM, Leon wrote:

I didn't read anything abut pitting.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I did -- but I had to "read between the lines" to see it:
"In December ... I laid it ... on top of my scrollsaw ... I picked it up last night...."
If green wood has been sitting on an iron or steel table for one to two months, that table's pitted.
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-MIKE- wrote:

"Doug Miller" wrote:

Yep.
In which case, shoot WD-40 to float the sworf away when you sand out the top with a ROS starting with 150 grit.
Finish by wiping with WD-40 and paper towels.
Finally, apply one of the top finishes such as BoeShield.
Yes you will have some pit marks showing, but they will strictly be cosmetic and have no effect on function.
And alternate would be one of the phosphoric acid based cleaners which require a neutralizer wash of water base.
You end up with a black surface where rust once was. No biggie unless vanity is an issue.
Lew
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On 2/5/13 5:25 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I never get a black surface from Rustfree, which is phosphoric acid based.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I get an "Exploit Blackhole Exploit Kit [type 2364] using this link.

Yeah, and hard on my bad elbow. I did it this way when I first got it (used) and cleaned the surface till shiney and waxed it. Now I feel dumb for letting it get away from me.

I've used Evaporust with great success but that needs to soak and I'm not sure I can do that without taking the table apart, which I'd rather not do. I haven't tried Rustfree ... yet.
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On 2/5/13 3:16 PM, Casper wrote:

It's pretty effortless. Whatever phosphoric acid does to rust, it's fast. You will want to clean up the rustfree with soap and water, however.... and that means you will also want to follow up with a protectant.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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800-311-3374
"Casper" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------ Talk to Kano Labs in Nashville, TN.
1-800-311-3374.
They have several products that deal with rust.
Kroil is a winner for freeing up rusted parts that are frozen together.
Lew
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On 2/5/2013 9:15 AM, Casper wrote:

Just polish it out--I use 400 wet/dry paper w/ any lubricant--even water is fine for the lubricant...just dry afterwards. Unless the can isn't handy my general first choice is K-1 followed by WD40 since there's almost always some around, but it really matters very little for such superficial rust.
Once back to clean surface then one of the surface protectant products is ok altho probably not really needed unless your shop is so damp that you're getting spontaneous rust besides for some reason as the above...
It's very dry here so I don't worry about anything more than a coat of old Johnson's paste wax once in a while to keep things "slicked up". The old barn isn't terribly tight so occasionally after a driving wind and snow/rain there's some water so it's a pretty routine operation. If I were anal about pristine appearances (a few stains make no difference whatever as to performance; if anything they're "character" :) ) I'd cover stuff. If I know there's a bad'un coming and think of it I do try to cover them but don't always get one of those round tuits ahead of time w/ all the other stuff that generally needs doing on a farm before...
So, in a long-winded sorta' way I'm trying to say the world has not gone a-kilter just for a little surface rusting on a tool table... :)
--
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