OT Lawmakers Look To Ban Metal Bats

Page 1 of 2  
New Jersey lawmakers are trying to ban metal bats, stating that they are more dangerous than wooden bats. A child was struck by a ball hit off a metal bat and is now in a coma. Now, I'm not trying to minimize what happened to the child, but isn't this a bit too far? Its just another thing that someone is trying to take from us. I was talking toour neighbor yesterday about how the place has changed. He's well into his 70's and said that if I were around back then I would be horrified of all the freedoms we've lost over the past 50 years. I remember when I was in elem. school, for show n tell I took 30.06 bullets, yes LIVE bullets. No one thought anything of it. We used to take our guns to school for hunting afterwards across the street! I used to ride in my parents cars IN the back windows! Yes I know its all for safety, but its just another bit of life "THEY" take away. If "they" stop telling us how to live safely then maybe we wouldn't have to be building all these damn houses and projects and taking away all the land!
Sorry had to rant. But there is wood content,, WOODEN BATS!!!
Anyone make they're own wooden bat?
Shopdog
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I remember in the 6th grade a boy took his swing and let go of the bat. It went right back at the catcher's face and the end of the bat went right into one of his eyes (can't remember which eye), and he wore that black eye for almost two weeks. The metal bat didn't do anything wrong, it is where on the child's head the ball struck him. I remeber riding in the back seat of he car unrestrained, but the cars were cars then and not made out of plastic and fiberglass. I also rmember taking the Mauser from WWII to school, kind of like show and tell. No one thought a thing of it. I am always referring to the "good old days" and someone quickly reminds me that they weren't so good. Maybe not, but they were better than some we have now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shopdog wrote:

see anyone using it at a game though. http://www.customwoodcrafter.com/ballbat.htm Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Shopdog" wrote in message

My turn, then ...
Bats shouldn't be made from anything but wood! Just compare the satisfying sound of a wooden bat hitting a ball with the aggravating, metallic ping of a metal bat.
The sound of an aluminum bat hitting a ball, akin to someone scraping fingernails on a blackboard, is a crime against nature, Mom and Apple Pie, and could only be enjoyed by some dufus who wears his baseball cap backwards ... indeed, there oughta be a law!
Now, someone else's turn ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/29/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" countered with

Metal bats, wooden bats, it has all been done before.
How about a polypropylene bat, the Brooklyn Smasher?
http://www.coldsteel.com/92bs.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, instead of the satisfying sound of a wooden bat or the tinny sound of an metal bat, what sound do you get?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

sound of your credit card going through the scanner, only much louder. What could be more contemporary and american than that?
(I have had no experience with this bat.) The above remarks were my crude attempt at a metaphor of some kind.
It should be pointed out that the above bat was primarily designed as a serious, non-firearm weapon. As though the wooden and aluminum bats were somehow or another inadequate in this respect.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This ought to be a good start.
Bats? BATS? In my day, we couldn't afford bats. We had to use a stick.
--
For every complicated, difficult problem, there is a simple, easy
solution that does not work.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Neither should hockey sticks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

to be using this day and time!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FWIIW, I understand that in eastern Europe, where you can't have firearms, that an aluminum bat is the weapon of choice among thugs, etc. You can see where this is all heading...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh--BASEBALL bats. I thought at first that they were on about some kind of Halloween decor.

Classic example of idiot legislators going after the wrong end of the problem, probably because "if it only saves one life" and "for the children" (two of the scariest phrases in the English language when uttered by a politician) can be combined to get votes and banning aluminum bats is _easy_.
The real problem seems to be that kids are more vulnerable than adults to "commotio cordis", a condition where a light impact to the chest at just the right time can induce fibrillation, and when they're tired from exercise they beome even more so. Doesn't matter if it was an aluminum bat, a wooden bat, or a thrown ball, if it hits at just the right time and in just hte right place the kid goes down and if he doesn't get prompt and competent help he stays down. 50 mph on a softball will do it for a healthy adult--that doesn't take an aluminum bat.
What makes more sense to me is a triple strategy--teach the kids to protect themselves--that's as simple as holding your gloved hand in front of your chest when the ball is in play and you aren't actively in the process of trying to catch it (not a problem for fielders IMO, the runner shouldn't be square-on to the ball anyway so if I understand the mechanism correctly he's less at risk); teach the coaches and officials to administer CPR to kids and require that they have a current certificate in order to coach or officiate; require that _somebody_ have an automatic defibrillator available at each game--how this will be paid for and who's responsible is why the legislators get paid the big bucks.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

Couldn't the kids just wear a chest protector, like you can use for Cricket http://www.barringtonsports.com/cricket/Product_OBO_P1_Chest_Protector.htm ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tue, Oct 31, 2006, 10:35am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@aol.net (Shopdog) doth wonder: <snip> Now, I'm not trying to minimize what happened to the child, butisn't this a bit too far? Its just another thing that someone is trying to take from us. <snip>
Didn't you know? Being elected to "any" political office seemingly immediately gives you two magical powers. 1. You think you are now intelligent, 2. You think you are now an expert on any subject. Unfortunately any "honesty" and "common sense" powers are at the same time taken away.
JOAT If it can't kill you, it ain't a sport.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My son has played organized baseball since he was 5 and he is 15 now and everybody has always used a metal bat. They were just coming into being when I was in Little League and have come a long way.
I remember when he was 9-years-old and I saw a somewhat smallish 10-year-old who wasnt all that good literally CRUSH a ball that almost took off the pitchers head. It was then and there that I realized something is way wrong with metal bats and it isn't the stupid "Ping!" sound either. The ball was definitely coming off the bat harder and faster than off a wooden bat.
I have done a lot of reseasrch and have come to realize that a metal bat is supposed to do just that: Increase the speed the ball comes off the bat and the distance. The way it does that is they have come out with more and more metals that can be made into a bat with the walls being thinner and thinner and more flexible. Inside the metal bat is a bladder like in a football. This bladder contains various type of pressurized gas. WHen the walls of the bat are flexed into the bladder, the ball literlaly springs off the bat with ungodly power and speed.
Colleges have been thinking about switching from metal bats to wooden ones again as well. The metal bats, obviously, last a lot longer because they rarely break. But when the players use a wooden bat for the major league scouts, their balls fall 40-50-60+-feet shorter than they normally would. This turns a player who is a home run hitter into a hitter that hits long flyball outs. This proves the theory that a ball is hit further with a metal bat than with a wooden bat.
Finally, I know it is harder for fielders, especially outfielders, to play their position with metal bats because a dinky little pop to the pitcher sounds the same as a double against the fence. Not that somehting like that should make a difference but when a skinny little kid can hit a ball a lot harder than he is supposed to, it gets dangerous. And don't forget: 9- and 10-year-olds pitch from 48-feet away and their reflexes are not nearly as developed as an older person and if that skinny little kid hits a ball like a 16-year-old, don't you think that puts the pitcher at a severe disadvantage?
I will get off my soapbox now...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Before you do, what about the schools that are banning playing Tag now?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote

things that happened to me in elementary school. People think I make this stuff up. They are horrified. And it was just a typical country school where I grew up.
Example; If a ball went over the fence, we needed three guys to retrieve it. Two to keep the angry, territorial bull distracted. And one to recover the ball. Needless to say, the two bull distractors were are fastest runners. And the reason we used two was if one fell down.
And the fact that almost no one at our school had money enough to wear those fancy tennis shoes to play soccer. We just used our regular work/logging boots.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Splorf! Do leagues that allow those bats have rules against corking wooden bats?
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shopdog wrote:
<snip> > He's well into his 70's and said > that if I were around back then I would be horrified of all the freedoms > we've lost over the past 50 years. I remember when I was in elem. school, > for show n tell I took 30.06 bullets, yes LIVE bullets. No one thought > anything of it. We used to take our guns to school for hunting afterwards > across the street! <snip>
At the end of WWII, when that 70's neighbor was maybe 10 years old, there were less than 150 million people in the USA.
We just passed 300 million a few days ago.
The amount of land hasn't changed except when Alaska & Hawaii were granted statehood.
That land across the street where you used to hunt, probably has houses on it today.
The point is that more people in the same space create more demanding conditions.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 19:00:58 GMT, Lew Hodgett

I'm with you, Lew.
I believe that there is a critical density of population that describes the difference between living a decent life and not.
I have no backup for this, in a scientific sense, but it is a strong feeling in me.
A strong feeling is usually a synthetic judgment about a condition.
It is not scientifically informed but it is the end result of your experience in life.
There is perhaps a perfect density that describes the boundary between the vibrance associated with a strong community vs. the dehumanizing aspects of overcrowding.
I grew up in a small town that was the focal point of the surrounding agricultural community.
As you say, the places that I used to hunt and fish are now covered by houses.
It seems far too urban to me.
New arrivals admire it for its rustification.
Go figger.
I believe that the Nation State took over from the City State concept because of density.
Although it addressed volume - I do not think that the concept addressed quality of life.
But, here we are.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.