OT: kinda nice (again)

Well; I think it is a class act when someone else has to say it for you !!!
British newspaper salutes Canada . . . this is a good read. It is funny how it took someone in England to put it into words.....
Salute to a brave and modest nation - Kevin Myers , 'The Sunday Telegraph' LONDON :
Until the deaths of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan, probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that Canadian troops are deployed in the region.
And as always, Canada will bury its dead, just as the rest of the world, as always will forget its sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does.. It seems that Canada 's historic mission is to come to the selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored.
Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again.
That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American continent with the United States , and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts.
For much of the 20th century, Canada was torn in two different directions: It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never fully got the gratitude it deserved.
Yet it's purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy. Almost 10% of Canada's entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle.
Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, it's unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular memory as somehow or other the work of the 'British.'
The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone.
Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth largest air force in the world. The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time.
Canadian participation in the war was acknowledged in film only if it was necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not participated - a touching scrupulousness which, of course, Hollywood has since abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.
So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality - unless, that is, they are Canadian. Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland, Michael J. Fox, William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter, Mike Weir and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and Christopher Plummer, British.
It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada has proved quite unable to find any takers.
Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of its sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. The Canadians proudly say of themselves - and are unheard by anyone else - that 1% of the world's population has provided 10% of the world's peacekeeping forces. Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth - in 39 missions on UN mandates, and six on non- UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia.
Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular non- Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia , in which out-of- control paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace - a uniquely Canadian act of self- abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit.
So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it in Afghanistan?
Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac , Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun. It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost. This past year more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.
Lest we forget.
********************* Please pass this on to any of your friends or relatives who served in the Canadian Forces or anyone who is proud to be Canadian; it is a wonderful tribute to those who choose to serve their country and the world in our quiet Canadian way.
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I am not proud to be Canadian, because I am not. However, many places in Holland do indeed honor Canadian soldiers of WWII. And many Dutchmen have chosen Canada as their country to emigrate to.
For the record, I am now a US citizen, but grew up in the city of Wageningen, near the center of the Netherlands, where the German occupation forces surrendered to the allies on May 5, 1945. The street my high school was on is still called the Generaal Foulkesweg after General Charles Foulkes (on 1 line): <http://www.veterans.gc.ca/remembers/sub.cfm ? sourceature/holland00/holschedule/wageningen>
"Wageningen is also where the 25th German Army officially surrendered in a battered hotel on May 5th. The surrender was signed by the commander of German forces in the Netherlands, Col.-Gen. Johannes Blaskowitz, in the Hotel de Wereld. The surrender was accepted by Lt.-Gen. Charles Foulkes, commander of the 1st Canadian Corps."
It is said to have to say that the museum in Hotel de Wereld is no more, and that in the 18 or so years I lived there I never visited.
This is a link to the monument in front of the Hotel de Wereld, commonly known as "naked William": <http://www.wageningen1940-1945.nl/Monumenten%20en % 20gedenktekens/Nationaal%20Bevrijdingsmonument.htm> (again, 1 line)
--
Best regards
Han
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Odd that they say no one knows anything -
How about 30 years ago and the aid the Canadian people provided in Iran ? !!!
Korea !!!
Iraq !!!
One of my early thrills was to live across the street from a Canadian Pilot who was in training with his men at a B-52 Base.
I was young and he was Proud. I could tell it by the way he dressed.
In the shop I have a worn out belt he gave me since I was 'thinner' and it could be cut down to my 'then' size.
I remember.
Martin
On 1/21/2011 7:27 AM, Robatoy wrote:

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As a child of a military father for most of his life and the first 18 years of mine we came to know and be proud of our northern neightbors because of joint military exercises. My father had lots of Canuck friends (and other nationalities) that he kept in touch with after retirement. I'm glad we have you guys up there to our north that stand for a lot of the things that we believe in. I like Australians too because I did some of my own military exercises with some of those fellas too as well as our British counterparts. If'n you ask me you Canucks rock. I'll hop off my box now.
RP
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RP wrote:

Not any more:
"[Ontario] Man faces jail after protecting home from masked attackers
"His surveillance cameras caught the attackers lobbing at least six Molotov cocktails at his house and bombing his doghouse, singeing one of his Siberian Huskies. But when Mr. Thomson handed the video footage to Niagara Regional Police, he found himself charged with careless use of a firearm."
http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/01/20/man-faces-jail-after-protecting-home-from-masked-attackers/#ixzz1BxM0IjM3
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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAMgmail.com says...

http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/01/20/man-faces-jail-after-protecting-home-from-masked-attackers/#ixzz1BxM0IjM3
There's more to this. How many people in rural areas have multiple surveillance cameras?
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J. Clarke wrote:

Remember, he had a chicken infestation. He was up to his lips in things most fowl.
His mistake was having Huskys. He should have had foxes or something that likes chickens.
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A friend of mine had two greyhounds that he rescued from dog track careers, he lived in a rural area with neighbors who had chickens. He discovered that his dogs liked chicken. <grin>
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http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/01/20/man-faces-jail-after-protecting-home-from-masked-attackers/#ixzz1BxM0IjM3
Maye we can convince more of our crimainal element to move up to Canada where they have more rights.
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wrote:

And we'll welcome people like Thomson down here in the States with open arms. (double entendre intentional)
Hey, maybe we can do a prisoner exchange! We'll send 'em our worst felons and they can send us their courageous homeowners.
-- "I probably became a libertarian through exposure to tough-minded professors" James Buchanan, Armen Alchian, Milton Friedman "who encouraged me to think with my brain instead of my heart. I learned that you have to evaluate the effects of public policy as opposed to intentions." -- Walter E. Williams
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On 1/24/2011 9:49 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

+1
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On 1/21/2011 7:27 AM, Robatoy wrote:

On a related note:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I've not yet read this, but I'm told it's excellent, eh ...
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim Daneliuk
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