OT - Homemade Hummingbird Feeder

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/hummingbird/msg061501211309.html?43
Neat. Simple, once you've read about how it goes togetherr that is. Not sure if I'll make one, but I think my older son might, I've printed a copy of this out for him. I'd like to hear if any of you make one. I just wonder, if I wanted to design, then make, a hummingbird feeder, would I have come up with something like this? Probably not, I don't have an tequila bottles. LOL
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Aug 5, 1:54 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

BX cable end bushings come already drilled through, and might be cheaper than wire nuts. Red ones are less attractive to wasps than yellow ones, more attractive to hummers -- no need to add controversial red dye to the nectar. CPCV (drinking water) pipe leaches fewer plasticizers than white PVC, which I'd be hesitant to use.
Design is virtually unlimited, given your imagination and the variety of available connectors. You could build a ring-shaped feeder as easily as a straight line "bar."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Aug 5, 2007, 1:05pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (FatherHaskell) doth sayeth: <snip> CPCV (drinking water) pipe leaches fewer plasticizers than white PVC, which I'd be hesitant to use. Design is virtually unlimited, given your imagination and the variety of available connectors. You could build a ring-shaped feeder as easily as a straight line "bar."
Going by what animals drink out of, and eat, without apparent harm, I'm not sure if using PVC would matter or not. Still, if you'e buying materials, instead of just using what's on hand, I'd say spring for CPCV, can't hurt, might help.
Yeah, but the straight type would be easier, and faster, to clean out. But like you say, once you'e got the idea, design IS virtually unlimited. I'm picturing a "grid" of about 6 straight bars, with a gallon jug as the feeder. Or, maybe a grid of 20' long pipes, fed by a 55 gallon drum. Or...
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) writes:

Hummingbirds are territorial, and will often chase other hummers away. We only get one at a time.
Also - you need to clean the glass every 3 days. That glass will be a pain to clean.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(J T) writes:

They are indeed territorial, but we consistently get a dozen of them at our feeders. They chase each other around if more than one comes to feed at a time, but that's not always the case. We consistently watch all of them at the two feeders we have out.

Hmmmm... I don't think my wife cleans the glass at all while the feeders are out for the season. Maybe she does and I'm just not aware of it, but if she does it certainly is not that frequently.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 6 Aug 2007 07:47:38 -0400, Mike Marlow wrote:

One male is guarding two feeders here in NJ. He sits in a nearby tree where he can see both feeders. Any other males, including juveniles, get chased off, sometimes before they can settle at the feeder. Seems somewhat violent, too. Sometimes I can hear them collide, along with the vocal chatter. He seems to let females feed at will, but once in a while if a female is on the feeder for too long, he comes down and hovers in front of her, amd assumes what I guess is a threatening posture - mouth wide open. She usually gets the hint. If she doesn't, he whacks her just as he does the males that don't move off of their own volition.
I'm not sure if the behavior is the same all day - we usually can only watch the goings on during the late afternoon and evening.
It is interesting to look at the photos posted with the description of that feeder. It looks to me like most of the birds (all that I can see well enough) are female, or perhaps juvenile males. I can clearly see only one male, in one of the photos.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We get mold inside the feeder from the syrup. We also do NOT use the "red" packaged syrup. We just use ssugar and water. (don't use honey!) Hummers have very sensitive systems. Someone who banded one said the bird peed red, from the food coloring in the syrup. It's not good for them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

They do have a sweet tooth and will climb up on your deck and stand on a chair to knock down feeder. My neighbor always brings the feeder inside before nightfall. Hope he has a strong door.     twitch,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Aug 6, 2007, 4:20pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@mahalo.charter.net (jo4hn) doth sayeth: I guess we have other kinds of problems up here in the sticks: bears. <snip>
Mmmm, bear. A bit greasy, but good. Sounds like you've found a great bait.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

    j4
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.