OT: drywall corner bead

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I'm with ya...just did a dozen or so window revels with drywall wrapped back to the window at my buddy's new bar, worked BEAUTIFULLY...will never go back to nails, and won't ever used "mud on".
It may seem like over kill, but in addition to the mud on the corner bead, there's a layer of tape where the coner meets the drywall...it's cheep insurance against cracking in the future, and it seemed to finish easier IMHO.
Regardless of the corner bead/mudding...there's FREE BEER until he forgets what I did for him...fortunately he's a young guy ;-)
DAC
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ok, 2 questions
1)what size staple are we taking about? just curious.
I've got a <http://www.arrowfastener.com/FMPro?-db=web.fp5&-format=product.html&-lay=Entry&-Op=Equals&itemnumber=ET2025&-find= . It buries 1/2" quarter round, outside corner, wallboard. does all cables too. staples up to 9/16" . all staples are diff heights, not widths, cept single side brads. Stop plate for round cables. I'm not gonna use it, just curious. Always screws.
2)What about metal corners on inside corners? I have done this everywhere I can. No big deal.
-
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bent wrote:

You use regular perforated metal corner beads on inside corners? Or are you talking about the metal flex tape?
The only time I use flex tape on an inside corner is if it's not a 90 degree corner and/or the drywall isn't straight.
R
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solid, w/ screws
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I'm not talking industry i would never use a nail just taking all precautions say where a fuse box panel juts out from a wall not always it can be a blessing
-
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bent wrote:

It's not clear who or what you're replying to if you don't quote the relevant post.
R
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wrote:

One-inch narrow crown staples.

I never bother. But I'm no expert on drywall.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Thu, 23 Feb 2006 22:38:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I thought that was what drywall screws were for?? Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I was using 1 inch staples, and the perforated metal corner that can be had at any BORG. I liked the staples better than nails or screws because they would have less protuding above the surface of the metal edging.
As for the stapler, I have an inexpensive Bostich SX150 <http://images.google.com/images?q=bostitch+sx150 picked up for $30 from ebay.
A stapler like this <http://www.trim-tex.com/productsindex.htm using 1/2" divergent staples seems interesting, and no air hose, would like to hear from those that have.
The single best reason is that I've found is that being able to hold the edging in place with one hand, and fastening with the other. Drywall screws have their place, and I've used many for this application, BUT the stapling method rocks!
DAC
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snipped-for-privacy@splinters.comcast.net wrote:

Too easy to dimple and crimp the corner bead if you set a screw even a couple hairs too deep.

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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 23:14:50 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I must just be lucky, mine came out fine... and I use a Crapman driver! *lol*
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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They are for the sheet rock.
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On Thu, 23 Feb 2006 22:38:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I haven't done other than use the crimped-on corner beads in prolly twenty-five years.
I'd used nails and screws in the past.
The crimp-ons are self aligning, with a little bit of restraint.
If a nail or screw pulls the bead off line, it's hard to bring it back.
It is also too often the case that a nail or screw stands proud of the line that the knife needs to follow during finishing.
Not so with crimped-on beads.
The only time I've seen the crimp-ons fail is when the rock was applied so that the beveled edge was where the bead should go.
This doesn't allow the crimp to get a good bite.
Some guys do it because they think that the bead will be planar with the rock face, but that is not the way things were designed to go together.
The bead will definitely stand proud of the plane of the rock if you do it the right way, but that is the accepted practice.
It sucks to be a trim carpenter that comes behind this way of doing, but that's the way it is.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Tom Watson wrote:

I second Toms post. I have had to attach cornerbead upon occasion when I don't have my crimper with me, but it is such a pain and does not come out nearly as elegantly.
FWIW, corner bead was designed to be installed with crimpers. That is how it was supposed to be installed and I would say that 95% of all corner bead is installed that way. I have never seen any professional do it any other way, except in the case of small patches or with one or two pieces.
I am a general contractor, and if I saw it being applied with screws, nails or staples, I would find another drywall sub.
You really can't get it right with anything else.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Thank you!
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And of course a contractor seldom does the work himself. His interest is most often all about getting the job done cheaply and quickly.
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"Leon" wrote in message

I prefer the word "inexpensively" when it applies to me ... but you can be damn sure that nothing done in the way of construction is "cheap" anymore.
Thank you Katrina, FEMA and commodity/oil traders.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
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I was hoping that you would not take my comments personally. I know that you are one of the few contracotrs/home builders that gets his hands dirty to make sure the job is done correctly and done so that the house will last. I know you do things a lot like me. Personally I do not want to see the customer again unless it is to sell him more work that he wants.

Yeah. Actually I believe "the storm" did less damage to the economy than FEMA and the commodity/oil traders have.
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Leon wrote:

And correctly. The proper term is inexpensively. Do you want your contractor doing it incorrectly and expensively? Most of the work I do is at cost plus, so it would actually be in my best interests to do it more expensively as it would generate more profit. I demand that it be done right, and in a professional manner. That is why I only do work from referrals and have more work than I can handle.
Go and borrow and clincher. Put a piece of corner bead on with the clincher and one with screws, nails or staples. Look at the end product. I am sure that you will like the clinch-on uniformity and especially the finished product (after floating) much better than the fastened one.
We do use screws to secure the clinched on corners in high traffic areas. Clinch on the corner, then install screws at top and midpoint (another poster mentioned this). But the initial installation is always done with the clincher, as it installs the bead with the correct angle and aligns it properly on the corner. You have to see it to understand.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I stand corrected there. Inexpensively is the correct word to use there. And correctly is a must. However correctly does not always mean better. Putting in prefab partical board framed cabinets is correct but nusually not better than on site built cabinets or prefab cabinets built out of higher grade materials. Cost has a strong hold on which method or product will be used.
Do you want your contractor doing it incorrectly and expensively?
Absolutely not but there are many ways to do something correctly that often last longer and while more expensive during building, cheaper in the long run when repairs don't have to be addressed years or months later.
Most of

Yes but you would probably be under bid and loose the job.
I demand that it be done right, and in a

As is my case although I don't want to work full time any more. And in Texas as you well know, staying busy is not that hard to do. The shoddy contractors and builders have no problem staying busy either. When there is a building boom everyone stays busy. I shudder to think what many home owners in New Orleans and the surrounding area are going to have put up with and or end up with when all is said and done.

No doubt that it will look better initially but my fear is how it will "hold up" when it gets marinally bumped by a piece of furniture. While the resulting damage is no fault of the installer because it was done "correctly" I have to think the repair would be simpler if the strip does not in some cases not tear loose and require replacing the whole piece or by simply using a bit of touch up paint.

Is that method correct?? LOL. This is what I am talking about. The added insurance for what might happen after the warranty had run out for the home owner.
Clinch on the corner, then install screws at

I understand. I have also done warranty work for Kimball Hill Homes. I do not repair their sheet rock, rather repairs to trim work but have seen several instances in a single home and in many homes in a new neighborhood where the corner beads have popped loose.
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