OT - Drag Racing - Unimaginable Acceleration

Page 3 of 3  
Ahhh, no sweat. My '50 Chevvy coupe/220 cu in Jimmy could've beat it. Off a cliff. With a 20 ft head start. NO prob.     twitch,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I doubt it! I think the dragster would beat it! You Chevy would excelerate with gravity, where a dragster peaks out at 8X at launch and probably averages 4X the force of gravity through the run. A dragster would kick ass on you falling Chevy!
Any math geek want to prove/disprove this?? Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John gotcha. A crapsman table saw would beat a dragster if BOTH fell off a cliff and the tablesaw had a 20' head start. Don't take a math geek to see this.
Art

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg O wrote:

Yeah, but you forgot to factor in the twitch!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg O wrote:

Hey! Gotta have a level playing field here. Even if it is vertically level. ? [WTF did he say??]     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Knew a family that had a semi-pro track near/behind his house. Said he wondered why the property was so cheap. Didn't take long for him to figure it out the first fri. night. Just saw History Channel's take on Drag racing wow stuff. Concluded that the allowance of straight NO system along with computer controlled fuel/booster injection the current speed record could be blown out of the water.
--


"TeamCasa" < snipped-for-privacy@teamcasa.dotorg> wrote in message
news:403ae125$1 snipped-for-privacy@Usenet.com...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like to relate this acceleration to the space shuttle...about twice that of the shuttle. Granted it's only for about 3 to 4 seconds, and the shuttle is 8 minutes...
Some more shuttle fun facts...
It takes only about eight minutes for the Space Shuttle to accelerate to a speed of more than 17,000 miles (27,358 kilometers) per hour.
The Space Shuttle main engine weighs 1/7th as much as a train engine but delivers as much horsepower as 39 locomotives.
The turbopump on the Space Shuttle main engine is so powerful it could drain an average family-sized swimming pool in 25 seconds.
The Space Shuttle's three main engines and two solid rocket boosters generate some 7.3 million pounds (3.3 million kilograms) of thrust at liftoff. Compare that with America's first two manned launch vehicles, the Redstone which produced 78,000 pounds (35,381 kilograms) of thrust, and the Atlas, which produced 360,000 pounds (163, 926 kilograms).
The liquid hydrogen in the Space Shuttle main engine is -423 degrees Fahrenheit (-253 degrees Centigrade), the second coldest liquid on Earth, and when burned with liquid oxygen, the temperature in the engine's combustion chamber reaches +6,000 degrees F. (+3,316 degrees C.)
The energy released by the three Space Shuttle main engines is equivalent to the output of 23 Hoover Dams.
Each of the Shuttle's solid rocket motors burns 5 tons (5,080 kilograms) of propellant per second, a total of 1.1 million pounds (500,000 kilograms) in 120 seconds. The speed of the gases exiting the nozzle is more than 6,000 miles (9,656 kilometers) per hour, about five times the speed of sound or three times the speed of a high-powered rifle bullet. The plume of flame ranges up to 500 feet (152 meters) long.
The combustion gases in a solid rocket motor are at a temperature of 6,100 degrees Fahrenheit (3,371 degrees Centigrade), two-thirds the temperature of the surface of the sun. While that temperature is hot enough to boil steel, special insulation inside the motor protects the steel case so well that the outside of the case reaches only about 130 degrees F. (54 degrees C.).
A stacked booster is the same height as the Statue of Liberty (not including pedestal) -- 151 feet (46 meters) -- but weighs almost three times as much.
The four engines of a Boeing 747 jet produce 188,000 pounds (85,277 kilograms) of thrust, while just one SRM produces more than 17 times as much thrust -- 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kilograms). A pair of SRM's are more powerful than 35 jumbo jets at takeoff.
If their heat energy could be converted to electric power, two SRMs firing for two minutes would produce 2.2 million kilowatt hours of power, enough to supply the entire power demand of 87,000 homes for a full day.
The Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS), or robot arm, provided by the Canadian Space Agency, weighs about 905 pounds (411 kilograms) on Earth but can move cargo in space weighing 66,000 pounds (29,938 kilograms), objects about the size of a Greyhound bus.

SNIP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The dragster could get up to 17,000 mph in 3 minutes if it had a fuel tank that big. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SpazMaTaz wrote:

You forgot: The longer the engines burn the greater the potential acceleration.
?
Because the shuttle gets lighter.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You should see a 1/24 scale dragster doing over 100 mph. It ain't quite like a real top fueler but it does the scale 1/4 mile in under .500 seconds.
John Emmons

along.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cool!
Rob
--



******PLEASE NOTE OUR NEW EMAIL ADDRESS******

snipped-for-privacy@telus.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TeamCasa wrote:

You omitted this part before the last sentence:) Now that gentleman, is acceleration. Never mind how quick your car is away from a stoplight, forget about the time you spun your tires in second gear.
As I recall we are paraphrasing; the book was about legendary cars and the above scenario was about a W125 Mercedes Benz Grand Prix car of the 1930's.
While the power generated is impressive, what I find astounding is that it can be transferred to the pavement with what, a little over a square feet of contact area.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: [snip]
|While the power generated is impressive, what I find astounding is that |it can be transferred to the pavement with what, a little over a square |feet of contact area.
What you must consider is that the "pavement" is as highly engineered as the cars.
Traction improving compounds are applied so that the tires "hook up" much better than in the days when I was drag racing (late 50s-early 60s)
See: http://www.bazellracefuels.com/VHT.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

====================================This is not the kind of discussion I thought I would read this morning in the woodworking newsgroup....
But as a 60 + yo serious woodworker and a Car Nut I had to chip in... John Lingenfelter unfortunately died receintly ...and the Corvette community is still mourning his passing... Only good thing is that he was behind the wheel with his right foot planted to the floor ... doing what he enjoyed....
Bob Griffiths 64 72 & 99 Ragtops 76 79 & 95 Coupes 68 SS 396 Chevelle for the track
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lingenfelter was involved in an accident in Oct-02, underwent surgery in Nov-02, entered into a coma, and died in Dec-03.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cool!!!
www.WhiteHouse.org
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TeamCasa wrote:

And
Not to mention not backing off the throttle then getting back into it.
There's a Top Fuel Harley contender/ National rated rider up the road a ways. I was told he was part of the way through a run, noticed his hand had slipped on the throttle, so he cranked it back to full. Such are the mistakes made in the heat of battle.
He hydro locked the engine, blew the head. It caught him in the chest. Statistically he should have died.
You know what they say about statistics.
He did spend quite a long time in the hospital getting his guts put back in place.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.