O/T: Still Smoke?

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Just received the following from my daughter about her uncle, (My Ex BIL).
Born in 1945, a heavy smoker all his life, looks like the big "C" finally got him.
If you still smoke, might want to think about it.
It's never TOO LATE to quit.
Nothing to enjoy about this one.
Lew --------------------------------------

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

8>< snip No, I don't smoke. 67 is pretty good mileage for a '45 model and we all have to go some way. After 70 it is all downhill--many of your childhood friends gone. Not sure I want to toddle around in a nursing home waiting to die when I reach the max life span. I'd rather be wasting away in Margaritaville.
--
G.W. Ross

How do you get holy water?... Boil the
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Really lousy advice. For every one or two who smoke, drink and reach a ripe old age, a dozen who did the same thing die off early with after experiencing really difficult health problems.
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"Dave" wrote in message

Really lousy advice. For every one or two who smoke, drink and reach a ripe old age, a dozen who did the same thing die off early with after experiencing really difficult health problems. =================================================================Who forced them to do it.
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Feel like playing it stupid do you?
Of course no one forced them to do it. The fact is that society as a whole pays the bulk of the cost when people become sick. There's a definite benefit to be had by enabling programs and advertising to try and convince people to quit smoking, drinking, exercise more and eat properly.
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True but peer pressure played a fair role with me starting. During the early 60's we were still pretty ignorant on the effects of smoking. TV hero's had cigarettes hanging from their lips and the Marlboro Man hadn't died of the effects yet. When I started openly smoking my folks didn't like it but both smoked. Many if not most of my friends smoked. I'll never forget one small-town Halloween evening when the nightwatchman rounded up a dozen or more of us for general mischief. We were all sitting on the curb, most were smoking and staring at the ground when we hear a voice from behind "Well....that looks like most of my football team!". It was the coach and MY GOD did we run wind sprints the next afternoon!
Thankfully, youth of today don't have that kind of peer pressure: but I still seem quite a few smokers among the teen-early 20's crowd. And this includes some who really don't seem to make sense - smart young college types as well as others. The other thing that doesn't make sense is hospitals and nursing homes. When you hang around these facilities you see large numbers of nurses, other employees and a few doctors who absolutely know better --but they are smoking.
But then, did you ever see a health dietician who weighted less than 200 pounds? :O).
RonB
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wrote:

Sounds like the way many of us started back then. Fortunately, I quit in the mid 70s.

I have, but most are plain dumb about food. My wife has CHF and they had her take this class and I attended.
Dietician said not to drink milkshakes as they are bad for you. I asked if milk is OK, she said yes. I asked if small servings of ice cream was OK and she said yes.
Dietician said to avoid sausage as it is bad for you.
I asked if ground pork is OK, and she said yes.
I asked if my home made sausage is OK. She said it is still sausage and not good for you.
She could not wait for the class to be over and be rid of me.
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"Dave" wrote in message wrote:

Feel like playing it stupid do you?
Of course no one forced them to do it. The fact is that society as a whole pays the bulk of the cost when people become sick. There's a definite benefit to be had by enabling programs and advertising to try and convince people to quit smoking, drinking, exercise more and eat properly. =========== =====================================================So, you agree that no one forced them. Your socialist argument is crap. I don't live in Canada.
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Pfffft. Tell that to my father, an avid bicyclist.
Dad's going to be 81 in September. He bicycled 70 miles on his 70th birthday, and decided last summer he was going to try for "80 on 80".
He actually managed 83 miles -- with four friends in their 30s accompanying him in 20-mile relays. They were more worn out at the end of the day than he was.

That's what my wife's parents are doing -- just wasting away and waiting to die. But they're doing it in the back bedroom of our house, not in Margaritaville, because their health is ruined. They did not take care of themselves when they were able to (poor diet, and no exercise whatsoever), and as a result, they now are no longer able to. They could easily *afford* Margaritaville, but they are too infirm to make the trip or to enjoy either the trip or the destination.
Observing the differences between my parents and my wife's parents has certainly rearranged my thinking about investing for retirement: if you don't invest in your *health* while you still have the ability to do so, your financial investments don't mean a damn thing.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Likewise, it's never too late to start! As Mark Twain said: "A woman is only a woman, but a cigar? That's a smoke!" (Of course Sigmund Freud said "Sometimes a cigar is only a cigar.")
Now I've had many a do-gooder, like the above, revile me with unsolicited advice. Sometimes they skip the advice and move immediately to Phase II.
(Granny lady whacks me with her umbrella): "You godless communist! You can't smoke here!"
Rejoinder (pick one):
"It's all right, madam, I'm French." "If I quit, what will we use to cover the smell?" "I-Am-A-Grenade and this here cigarette is my pin. You have to ask yourself, 'Do I feel lucky?'. Well, punk, DO you feel lucky?" (The Nixon response) "I believe it is out." "Put out my cigarette? I've been trying for almost an hour! Now, now, don't tell me. I've go to figure this out for myself!"
I have a few more in my repertoire, that I use depending on the occasion.
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wrote:

Are you sure? I though Bill Clinton said that.
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On 6/16/2012 9:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Actually, I think it was Monica ...
--
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Actually, Monica said ".....a cigar is only a CIGARRROHHHHHHWOOOOW!"
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Didn't she say "A sucker is born every minute."?
-- Stain and poly are their own punishment.
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On Sat, 16 Jun 2012 08:19:55 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

Having grown up in Kentucky, of course I smoked. Starting at the age of 14 on a dare with an evil black stogie (Marse Wheeling?). Didn't get sick, but switched to cigarettes as they were cheaper - 12 or 14 cents a pack for the cheap brands in 1951. I smoked unfiltered ones for about 20 years and then switched to filtered.
When I was 60 I had a small heart attack and was convinced to quit. But I got my cardiologist to agree that one cigar a month was OK. I did that for 10 years. When I turned 70 I decided I could go to one a week. If I make it to 80 maybe I'll up that - 5 more years to go.
One interesting note. I lived in L.A. for 10 years. When I moved to Boise and went in for a physical, my doctor informed me that I was 40, my body was 30, and my lungs were 80.
Six years later I moved to Virginia. At my next physical my doctor said he hated me - I'd been smoking for 30+ years and my lungs showed no sign of damage.
Ten years of smog followed by six years of mountain air.
Now don't get me wrong. There's no way smoking is good for you. If you don't smoke now, don't start. Unless you're in your 70s - you'll die of something else before the smoking can kill you :-).
For those of you who do, if you can't quit, at least cut down. Way down. If I can go from a carton a week to one cigar a month, so can you. All it takes is motivation.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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That is pretty much the way I quit. I didn't really plan it out but I just stared cutting back. In early days I was at about 2 packs a day and did that until the last couple of years. Then I decided it was too much and started pulling back. Then I reached a point were I was just smoking about 1/2 pack a day. Then days when I didn't smoke at all or maybe one or two. No firm decision point that I was going to quit until I rolled down the window one afternoon and pitched a nearly full pack of smokes out onto the street (Yeah - littering but the best crime you can commit). After that I will admit to falling off a time or two by mooching but I have been "clean" for the past 15 years of so.
Could I really enjoy a cigarette right now? Oh hell yes! But I won't. But knowing I have quit after years of smoking, and knowing I would still enjoy a good drag, should be a lesson to those thinking of starting and believing they can stop at any time.
RonB
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"HeyBub" wrote in message
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Likewise, it's never too late to start! As Mark Twain said: "A woman is only a woman, but a cigar? That's a smoke!" (Of course Sigmund Freud said "Sometimes a cigar is only a cigar.")
Now I've had many a do-gooder, like the above, revile me with unsolicited advice. Sometimes they skip the advice and move immediately to Phase II.
(Granny lady whacks me with her umbrella): "You godless communist! You can't smoke here!"
Rejoinder (pick one):
"It's all right, madam, I'm French." "If I quit, what will we use to cover the smell?" "I-Am-A-Grenade and this here cigarette is my pin. You have to ask yourself, 'Do I feel lucky?'. Well, punk, DO you feel lucky?" (The Nixon response) "I believe it is out." "Put out my cigarette? I've been trying for almost an hour! Now, now, don't tell me. I've go to figure this out for myself!"
I have a few more in my repertoire, that I use depending on the occasion. ========================================================================My wife has a shirt that says "Thank you for holding your breath while I smoke".
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Started smoking during the early 1960's when I was about 14. I quit about 15-20 years ago but still wonder how much damage I did to myself.
RonB
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On 6/16/2012 9:36 AM, RonB wrote:

Quit a three pack a day habit of thirty years on November 16, 1991 at 2AM.
I still think smoking was one of the great pleasures of life ... not since have I taken those relaxing "smoke breaks" that broke a hard day's work into manageable chunks.
But we do know that, after that many years, the danger still lies within.
That said, the doctors made my paternal grandfather quit at the age of 93 (unfiltered, roll-your-own, Prince Albert pipe tobacco, smoked like a cigarette since the age of nine).
We would be so lucky ...
--
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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Yes, but as most people who have quit smoking know, the noticeable benefits far outweigh the danger that remains.
I quite smoking 33 years ago when I was 25. One day, I just got really tired of the bad taste in my mouth, the sore throat and the nicotine smell on my fingers.
Three months after I quit, I tried a cigarette and it tasted terrible. I've never had the urge to smoke again. People have told me that I wasn't really addicted then, but those ten years of smoking might suggest otherwise. In any event, it was one of the smartest things I've ever done.
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