O/T: Folded Dipole

Page 7 of 7  


I worked in the Arctic and noticed that some Inuit use the heat dissapating grid off the back of old fridges as an antennae to pick up CBC. Considering that was an analog signal from 100's of miles away, it was an impressive use of recycling.
P
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"the existing folded dipole antenna."

CURIOUS - Did you visit Antenna Web before deciding upon an antenna? If so, I would be interested in what they reported as far as your antenna requirements and reception probabilities. I am NOT near a big city and can only get one Public TV station with our roof-mounted antenna.
I built a dipole for the FM radio I have, but it didn't improve things all that much for "distant" stations.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

... That's one more than we're now getting since the switchover. W/ the outdoor mast-mounted antenna, their signal is undetectable entirely during a scan although the analog was reasonably watchable most of the time. As I've noted previously, I'm not going to spend time trying to fine-tune antenna position, etc., until the other stations also switch over so only do it once to at least see what the prospects are.
The one commercial station that did switch is ok and although it is the closest of the three (~60 mi) the box sensitivity is about 43% most times. Only dropout every so often. What's really annoying about that is that the box warmup message comes on again and hangs around for a while--if it would simply just go out and come back that wouldn't be nearly such a pita.
I'm sure w/ simply a dipole Lew's close enough to his transmitters there was no need to look it up.
For us, the FCC maps and the antennaweb.org site both indicate "far fringe" but claim _should_ be viewable. The current antenna is rated for far fringe (I don't recall gain figures, etc) and relatively new having been replaced a couple years ago after big ice storm took previous one down and broke it up pretty badly.
I've noticed on those coverage maps other regional areas have very marked directional beam patterns that are leaving large sections of the formerly covered broadcast areas out entirely. It's clear the folks who thought all this up never thought a lick about fringe reception areas.
What kind of distance and terrain do you have to deal with? At least here it's flat which gives better shot. I'm guessing I may have to raise tower to get it farther from the house than it is at the moment when the others switch. I've no additional amp at the moment, either, btw.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A formula that did not flow out my other ear
folded dipole length in inches is equal to 5565 divided by the frequency in megahertz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.