Number of outlets?

Page 2 of 2  
I'm too lazy to look it up, but the general rule is your allowed 180VA per duplex receptacle for circuit calculations assuming its a general purpose receptcle circuit. Depending on the amperage of the cirucuit this would allow 10 on a 15 amp and 13 on a 20 amp. If you have loads that draw enough then they must be dedicated.
Mike M
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Mar 2007 20:05:04 -0800, Mike M

Setting a suggested value for calculating circuits is not the same as mandating the resultant number as a maximum. I don't doubt that the value is what you say, but I don't believe that it translates to a rule.
I'll continue to wait for a specific cite (although I'm confident the wait will be a long one).

--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If your running metal conduit you will definitely want to run stranded wire. A wires current carrying capacity is based on how much current the wire can substain without melting the insulation. I am pretty sure you will find different current ratings for stranded tth wire and romex in any electrical code book. Stranded in metal conduit can carry more amps than romex in conduit. I also believe that romex in conduit is rated for a lower load carrying capacity than romex in air because of the tendancy for conduit to store heat rather than disipate it into the air.
In any case running two hot legs, a neutral and a ground makes for easily mixing 110v and 220v circuits. In some cases I believe you don't have to run a ground in metal conduit and you can use the conduit for the ground. I am unsure of this though and would reccomend running an uninsulated copper ground. Seperate stranded 12g is a lot easier to work with than romex.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I stand corrected as far as dwellings and quest rooms per NEC rules. I haven't done anything but commercial in 20 years. Your local jurisdictin may have their own rules. If your building a stand alone shop it may not be classified as a dwelling unit so you have to check with your local inspectors.
(J) Dwelling Occupancies. In one-family, two-family, and multifamily dwellings and in guest rooms or guest suites of hotels and motels, the outlets specified in (J)(1), (J)(2), and (J)(3) are included in the general lighting load calculations of 220.12. No additional load calculations shall be required for such outlets. (1) All general-use receptacle outlets of 20-ampere rating or less, including receptacles connected to the circuits in 210.11(C)(3) (2) The receptacle outlets specified in 210.52(E) and (G) (3) The lighting outlets specified in 210.70(A) and (B)
220.44 Receptacle Loads Other Than Dwelling Units. Receptacle loads calculated in accordance with 220.14(H) and (I) shall be permitted to be made subject to the demand factors given in Table 220.42 or Table 220.44.
(I) Receptacle Outlets. Except as covered in 220.14(J) and (K), receptacle outlets shall be calculated at not less than 180 volt-amperes for each single or for each multiplereceptacle on one yoke. A single piece of equipment consisting of a multiple receptacle comprised of four or more receptacles shall be calculated at not less than 90 volt-amperes per receptacle. This provision shall not be applicable to the receptacle outlets specified in 210.11(C)(1) and (C)(2).
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My electrical inspector said there was no limit, it was up to the installer to estimate the load and install the appropriate amount of outlets.
I wish there was a limit though. My lazy builder wired the 3 rooms of lights, plus the outlets for 2 rooms all on the same circuit.. Kind of a bummer to turn on the printer and have three rooms of lights dim.. Had to run some new outlets myself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That must be a regional thing. In my area, no more than 7 on a single circuit.
bf wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And the last I knew NEC had a limit of 12 per branch circuit. I have to admit that I don't have an up to date copy of the NEC, so that may be dated information.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RE: Subject
See my earlier post, "Electrical Distribution For The Shop"
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Mar 2007 06:58:34 -0800, Mike M

In that setup you have to make sure that your hot wires are on opposite legs. If they are on the same leg your neutral is carrying both loads.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is done all the time in three phase electric. Black, red and some other color for the "hot" legs. White for the "neutral." Just one white for those three hot legs. But that is only if they need to deliver 120 from a 208 circuit. White is not used if you are working with a three phase device.Well I think is done all the time but I could be wrong as I am not an electrician. The excitement is if you turn off the breaker on one leg and the other legs are working. Remember I am not an electrician so take my words with a grain of salt.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-phase_electric_power
On Sat, 03 Mar 2007 10:11:39 -0800, Tim Douglass

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Mar 2007 20:10:08 GMT, Jim Behning

Three phase is a horse of a different color, and I'm not expert on it at all, but in a normal 2 phase panel (U.S.) you have 240 volts coming in as two 120V legs that are 180 degrees out of phase. In a 240 volt circuit you then have a 240V differential across the two legs. A 120V circuit consists of one hot leg and a neutral, giving a 120V differential. When you do two 120V circuits with a common neutral the two hots have to come from opposite legs so that the neutral never carries more load than one hot. If they come from the same leg the loads add together on the neutral and can easily overload that wire. While this is a common wiring practice and meets code, it is also one that is denigrated among electricians who do repair work, as it makes adding a circuit very difficult.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2 Mar 2007 09:51:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Well, really you can't have too many outlets. Go ahead and do it--it's inexpensive. You might consider putting in a 220 and 110 in the same box. Also, consider having a few leap-frogged circuits. I thought 10 ga wire was tough to work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would use ALL external boxes mounted on the wall using plastic conduit. Shops "never" turn out the way they start and your requirements will change down the road. With the external mounting, things can be changed with little trouble but if the boxes are in the wall, you are screwed.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 2, 12:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Suggestion.. I'd make a dedicated circuit for the dust collector. Decide if you are going to use a remote controller or not. I hate remote controls, because I always lose them. So I put 4 switches that control the DC power. It's easy to wire it so any switch can turn the power on or off.
Also, if you are putting two outlets per box, you might want to take the time to wire the right outlet with circuit A and the left with circuit B. That way if you ever want to run two things at the same time, you can plug them in seperate circuits.
Oh yeah, put in about twice as many lights as you think you need. I'm a big fan of those 8' shoplights. They are a little pricey, but they are better than the cheapo 4' ones that have a short lifespan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.