Newbie Woodworking Advice Part 2

First let me thank everyone for their thoughtful advice. Posting to newsgroups can be an iffy proposition at best. You never know what you might get. I fully expected to get at least some portion of smart ass remarks, but what I found was a collection of thoughtful and useful advice - THANKS!
To sort of answer some of the comments in previous posts - I realize that I didn'g give much details and as such I knew there would be some generalized answers. Part of my lack of detail is because I don't know as of yet what direction the woodworking will take me. My first thought is to make and build some stand alone furniture. There are a number of specific pieces that I have in mind. Since I am new, my plan was to stick with straight lines - shaker, mission style etc. Perhaps in my ignorance I am thinking it will be easier.
Due to the advice given in previous posts I am planning to hold off purchasing the RAS and check into a local wood working class. I did like the idea that having the compound miter saw could be moved to make room on the bench for other tools as needed, giving more flexibility in a limited space. I was definitely planning on a router and thanks to your advice I have a better idea of what to look for.
This was a long winded path to get to advice request #2 -
Based on the idea of building some basic furniture - what tools would you buy first?
Thanks again,
Fred
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A used DeWalt RAS.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Were you disappointed? We could try again! ;-)
<snip>

My opinion, worth exactly what you'll be charged for it, is that you're going to need some hand tools, without power cords, and the stuff and skill to keep them sharp.
A modest set of chisels, such as the Marples bevel-edge, or maybe a little better. You shouldn't need to spend more than maybe $50 on a set of 4 or 5.
Two or three hand planes. Good ones, whether they are old or new. A block plane. A #3 or #4 bench plane. A larger plane, like a #5 or bigger. Two or three handscrapers.
One or two modestly priced Japanese-style pull saws. There has been a lot of good discussion on these in recent threads. Google is your friend. If not, www.japanwoodworker.com is.
Some decent measuring tools. An accurate square. A marking gauge. A good steel rule. A scratch awl or marking knife. A pair of dividers or compass. A sliding bevel gauge.
Oh. You could buy a powered hand drill, and some good bits.
Read up on Scary Sharp on the web. Or water stones. No power tools are needed, at least not for now. If you can't sharpen it with either of those two methods, take it to a professional for service.
Get the McFeeley's catalog, as well as their $10 sampler package of fasteners. One of the best deals in woodworking. And one of the best vendors, too.
Now here's the hard part. Take you wallet. Take out all of the credit cards, and give them to your wife for 'escrow', while you study the catalogs from Lee Valley, Garrett-Wade, Highland Hardware, Japan Woodworker, and maybe three or four others. Don't buy anything until you have thought it through for three days. If it still seems like a good idea, ask your wife for one of the cards back, preferably one with a modest limit.
You can spend a thousand dollars on the above, or find things used or on sale for a lot less. But none of these tools will be obsolete when your grandchildren might use them. They seldom wear out or break, if you buy reasonable quality. If you like estate or garage sales, you can find them really cheap, in some neighborhoods.
And find that adult ed program, so you can learn to use their power tools safely, and see what you like.
/preacher mode off
Welcome to the craft!
Patriarch
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On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 02:06:09 +0000, wrote:

OP: Listen to the man.
This belongs in the FAQ. (Is it there already? Who reads FAQs?) If I hadn't already done all those things, I'd print out his post and stick it to the shop wall. His advice is worth far more than he charged.
One other thing: have fun!
--
"Keep your ass behind you"


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I forgot the Four in One file/rasp. And a coping saw. And some of the neat stuff at www.supertool.com.
And...
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On Fri, 10 Sep 2004 21:56:42 -0500, Australopithecus scobis

and since you're thinking about a shop on the freakin' third floor, make it a rule to not buy any tools you can't easily carry up and down 2 flights of staris....
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

To add to the already excellent advice
CLAMPS
When I started out, I'd not hesitate to buy a slick looking power tool, but had to get an extender for extra leverage on the crowbar for clamps. That was a mistake. You need at least two Bessey K body clamps, preferably the 31", but you can supplement them with the lower cost Tradesman model clamps. A couple of 24" are nice and add from there.
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On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 02:06:09 GMT, patriarch <> wrote:

Or a Tage Frid style frame saw, if you prefer.
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What's wrong with 'and' ? ;-)
Patriarch
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wrote:

snip
hand tools.
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