Newbie - seeking direction

Hello,
Recently, I had to build new doors for my shed and found working with wood quite satisfying. I would like to learn more but I'm not sure where to start. There's so much to learn about wood, tools and lingo. all the sites that I found assume that you know this already. (and have a lot of tools!)
I would like to build some more projects before investing in any additional tools to see if I want to stick with it. I only have a compound miter, circular and jigsaw. (couple handsaws) Are there any projects that I could do with just these? Is there a website for newbies to get started?
Little off topic - I need to repaint my shed. Should I use primer or can I just paint over the old paint? (primer was used originally)
Thanks, Barb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am a newbie too.
I found that reading was helpful in both clarifying my level of interest, as well as giving me good ideas. A book I'd recommend is "The Complete Manual of Woodworking" by Albert Jackson et al., available at Barnes and Noble / Borders. This book talks about trees, tools, and projects, all geared to a newcomer without being patronizing. Also almost any of Taunton's publications (magazines such as Fine Woodworking, and their special interest books) are also invaluable to the newbie.
Practice is the best teacher. I would recommend that you just build something you need. Your existing tools (apart from a hand plane and a chisel or two) should be sufficient if the project is not too complex. This experience will also teach you 1) how involved woodworking really is, and 2) whether you enjoy it.
But as I have recently discovered, the real fun starts as you acquire and begin utilizing more tools. Arr, Arr, Arr.
/rick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| I am a newbie too. | | I found that reading was helpful in both clarifying my level of interest, as | well as giving me good ideas. A book I'd recommend is "The Complete Manual | of Woodworking" by Albert Jackson et al., available at Barnes and Noble / | Borders. This book talks about trees, tools, and projects, all geared to a | newcomer without being patronizing. Also almost any of Taunton's | publications (magazines such as Fine Woodworking, and their special interest | books) are also invaluable to the newbie. | | Practice is the best teacher. I would recommend that you just build | something you need. Your existing tools (apart from a hand plane and a | chisel or two) should be sufficient if the project is not too complex. | This experience will also teach you 1) how involved woodworking really is, | and 2) whether you enjoy it. | | But as I have recently discovered, the real fun starts as you acquire and | begin utilizing more tools. Arr, Arr, Arr. | | /rick. |
Hi Rick,
I guess I'm on the right track... I do have that book you suggested and have found it quite useful. You mentioned that I should get a plane... I looked in the book on page 22-23, there are several, which one would you suggest? What size chisels are mostly used? Ultimately, I would like to build a barrister bookcase but I think that's probably not the best place to start because I have trouble cutting straight lines. Can you think of any projects that would give me the experience and knowledge to help "build up" to the bookcase?
| But as I have recently discovered, the real fun starts as you acquire and | begin utilizing more tools. Arr, Arr, Arr.
LOL - I find that fun too!
Barb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my copy of the book, planes are discussed on pages 88 to 97. A jack plane is probably a good start.

Depends on the job. You could wait until you need one, then go and buy the size suited to the job at hand. Make sure you sharpen/hone them (and the plane) yourself before putting them to use.

Why not build the bookcase? You want to make it, so you will be most motivated and interested in the project. If you don't get a straight cut, your plane might help. If you really botch it up, just try another piece of wood and re-use the mungled board elsewhere. When using a circular saw, a long straightedge that you can clamp or anchor to the workpiece as a fence will help with those lines.
I have found that a friend with a table saw (and jointer!) was the best tool in my box.
/rick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You will be limited, but not out of the realm of woodworking. Small projects like boxes require smaller parts that can be cut on the miter saw. Ripping can be done with the circular saw using a good straighedge. You probably want to get a better blade that what you used for building the doors.
I started out with a cheap Craftsman table saw. I was so happy to see it go and replace it for a much better saw. That said, it was a good start and cheap if I later decided WW was not for me. You can get one for less than $200. If you truly like the hobby, invest in a better saw (figure $800 and up). Buy tools as needed.
Take a class at an adult-ed thing.

I'm not at home so I don't have any bookmarks ere, but I'ms sure others will help out. Ed

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've learned a lot from the already-mentioned sources (FWW, other magz), and from books ("Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking, etc.). To start out with a very well organized and logical approach to woodworking though, I highly recommend "The Fundamentals of Fine Woodworking" by Robert Ferencsick with Will Neptune (Sterling Publishing Co., 1996) for newbies (and others). I also highly recommend that one of the first technical books you dive into be Hoadly's "Understanding Wood" (Taunton Press). And then maybe a good book on sharpening. And hang out here on the wreck, ask questions, ignore the trolls, and read everything Preston Andreas posts.
-jbb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An easy project, and useful is a bench hook. You place the hook on a table, and use it to hold a piece of wood so you can saw/plane/sand it.
It's about 2 inches long, 4 inches wide, and a stip of wood fastened along the edge, but on opposide sides and ends.
Side view:
***XXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XX++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
*** = where wood goes +++ = where bench goes
You stand to the left, and as you push the saw forward, the hook holds the wood in place. Also, the side of the hook acts as a guide as you cut, so the handsaw cuts square.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here's an old book which might be of interest to you. Lee Valley reprints them and they're all really great. Projects for Woodwork Training http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=2&pageE172&category=1,46096,46100 General woodworking starts it off and it ends with rush/weaving.
If that doesn't suit your fancy, try Greg Millen's page for a list of the books we Wreckers like. http://greg.millen.com/Books.htm
--== May The Angst Be With You! ==-- -Yoda, on a bad day -- http://diversify.com Ending Your Web Page Angst.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The link Larry provided was shut down this week, use:
http://woodworking.homeip.net/wood/reference/books.htm instead,
cheers
--
Greg

"ANY response to a troll is a win for the troll."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Barb, I am new to woodworking also, but I have built up a collection of tools. My most recent acquisition was a like new 1997 Unisaw with 52" fence at an auction. However, I built a lot of things without it...had a SCMS, a circular saw, jig saw and drills. I asked tons of question in various forums and everyone is more than willing to help! Read here and check out womeninwoodworking.com and woodcentral.com. Go to the chats, read the articles and reviews, read every book and WW mag you can get your hands on. But be forewarned...it is ADDICTIVE! :-) Carole

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Barb,
Here's a great book I would recommend: "The Seven Essentials of Woodworking" by Anthony Guidice. The author's tone is a little opinionated but what he teaches is pure gold. He concentrates on the most basic and most important woodworking skills: marking, sawing, using hand planes, making basic joints, sharpening tools, and more. It greatly improved my skills.
You can learn a lot from books but don't make the mistake of jumping into complicated projects before you learn the basic skills. This book is a great way to start.
--Zaster
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some recommendations:
1. Read "The Seven Essentials of Woodworking" by Anthony Guidice. The author's tone is a little opinionated but what he teaches is pure gold. I didn't really know the basics of working wood until I read this book.
2. I think it's good to build lots of jigs and fixtures when you're getting started. Most of them are good learning projects and they greatly extend your capabilities in the shop. Bench hooks, squaring blocks, crosscut jigs, lots of jigs if you use a router. There are whole books devoted to jigs and fixtures.
3. Get a Workmate-style portable workbench. I have two large workbenches but my Workmate is so handy I use it all the time.
Have fun.
--Zaster
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Something I've found helpful is to build two, especially of smaller projects. I often (nearly always) manage to make mistakes, or later figure a better way to do something. You can use the first as a learning tool, and perhaps firewood, and the second as your final work. Heck, you might even end up with two acceptable pieces and have a birthday or christmas present covered.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi All,
This is a great group and I appreciate all the feedback on getting started. I look forward to checking out your recommendations and getting started!
Thank you!! Barb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Jun 18, 2004, 12:11pm snipped-for-privacy@email.com (Barb) says: <snip> Thank you!! No thanks are required.
However, it is alway wise to make a sacrifice to the Woodworking Gods. Don't try this at home, just send a nice, single, human female, who likes housework, along as a sacrifice. As their High Priest, I handle all administative details. You're welcome.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.woodshopdemos.com/menu2.htm http://www.newwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.woodworking.org / I have some other good links on my web page http://www.vmtw.com/links.html Scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.