new yankee workshop and drill press spindle sander

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i do not recalll ever watching an entire episode when it aired but recently i watched one and i had forgottent that he never gave the details and was pushing selling the plans
it was funny to watch it as he skips over a lot of details
but i did see that he used a spindle into the drill press as a spindle sander
i ordered a cheap set and i wonder if anyone here uses one of these on their drill press
does it work well
i will mostly use it for small stuff
the one i ordered does not oscillate but i know they make those
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2015 16:45:28 -0800, Electric Comet

It's a great idea, if you don't like your drill press. Side force is hell on the bearings.

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On Mon, 07 Dec 2015 20:09:35 -0500

for light sanding it will be fine
i like putting my tools to work so i think side force is not a big factor with light sanding
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 09:04:32 -0800, Electric Comet

Anytime you put sideways pressure on the spindle you can cause it to drift off center. Sanding at the end away for the chuck will put amplified pressure on where the chuck meets the tapered shaft.
It depends on the quality of the drill press as to how much you'll have to pay for the dance.
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On Tue, 08 Dec 2015 17:37:14 -0800

yeah not a big problem
nice that people care so much though about the drill press
i am thinking of giving it a name now mill or miller or drilly i know sander or sandy
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On Wed, 9 Dec 2015 09:21:49 -0800, Electric Comet

Any Craftsman or Tradesman cares about their tools, to keep them reliable so that when you need it the most it still does what it is supposed to do. There is a point and time where the tool is sloppy but still useful for things like you want to do.
Me? I'd like to start er up and see it spinning true.
But after all is said and done, your tool, your money, your choice.

Call it a Wibble Wobble oval hole maker. ;)

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On Thu, 10 Dec 2015 00:15:46 -0800

goes without saying but true
if a drill press could not handle some lateral force it would not be useful think about drilling through wood with knots etc
my table tilts as most do so again lateral forces
anyone that thinks a small spindle sand attachment is going to ruin a drill press has incorrect thinking
they are not applying common sense but common sense seems to be uncommon for many
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2015 10:53:46 -0800, Electric Comet

A friend of mine had a wobbly chuck and not due to the internals, but the fit of the chuck onto the spindle. If yours is pressure fitted and without a locking set screw from the inside of the chuck to the middle of the shaft then it will happen to your as well.
Just because something appears do-able doesn't mean its a smart move to try it.
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On 12/12/2015 1:55 AM, OFWW wrote:

Where'd you get that info? Most all quality chucks are mounted on either a Jacobs taper, or Browne and sharpe taper.
None that I know of use a set screw. The taper is what causes the good fit, and accurate centering.
On the other hand a chuck that is set to a shaft that has not been properly cleaned will not seat correctly and will cause all kinds of problems. Not concentric, wobbly, capable of falling off.
A low quality chuck would use a set screw..
--
Jeff

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On Sat, 12 Dec 2015 11:21:44 -0500

mine must be a jacobs taper i guess
it looks like about a morse #2 or 3 nothing wobbly at all
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On 12/12/2015 11:44 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

MT2 or 3 are what go into your quill.
The JT and BS are for the chucks.
--
Jeff

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On Sat, 12 Dec 2015 16:17:38 -0500

oh right i think i have heard that before
just guessing that the brown&sharpe taper older or jt is more widespread
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wrote:

Ok, Guess I am going to have to eat a little dirt here. Years and years ago I needed to change out a Jacobs chuck. This one really stuck hard in my head since I was expecting a normal tap off operation. I darned near ruined the drill press and I for sure ruined the chuck. The reason it would not come off was because of a screw at the bottom of the chuck locking in on the shaft. I buggered that screw and ended up drilling the head clean off, then removed the chuck and then removed the remaining parts of the screw. As a result that is so burnt into my mind that I always do a double check.
I don't remember having that same problems since. I have had problems with chucks not centering properly on the tapered shaft because of the lateral forces and possibly soft metal or metal fatigue since then. And as I said, my friends drill press was visibly wobbly, and he passed away before a replacement chuck was tried. (He was just going to throw the thing out due to his frustrations with it)
Also I always err on the better safe than sorry type of actions so I may have jumped the gun on this. I personally do about 50/50 hard metal to drilling wood on my Drill press.

Yet I have seen loose fits due to wear.

I have never considered Jacobs low end.
But thanks for your comments on my bad. :)
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On 12/13/2015 2:35 AM, OFWW wrote:

Those are generally for hand drills, which reverse. Not for drill presses. The JT taper would probably be too heavy for a hand drill. A threaded chuck is less accurate than a tapered chuck. But on a hand drill it does not matter much.

Like everything else, there are different levels of quality. I have a Jacobs chuck that came on a delta drill press, and it has jaws that are not correctly ground. So they make a drill bit wobble. Jacobs makes different levels of quality. Today, they have slipped heavily in quality. I have 2 machinist friends that will only use an old Jacobs, not a new one, and they both prefer the Albrecht (German chuck). I have both old, and new Jacobs. The new are quite inferior. I have 2 Chinese chucks that beat out the new Jacobs chuck. That's not good for the US. Our quality is slipping where we should still rule. I'll blame the bean counters, but it could be other factors. The price of a Jacobs is more ( you are paying for US made goods), but the quality is quite poor for the price.

--
Jeff

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On 12/13/2015 10:01 AM, woodchucker wrote:
[snip]

Are you saying the later Albrecht chucks are not as good as the older ones. I have an Albrecht from ca 1985. It's the cat's ass.
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On 12/13/2015 5:54 PM, gray_wolf wrote:

No, the albrecht have always been fantastic, but the Jacobs, are not up to the competition any longer. I don't know where you get that I was even saying that the Albrects were not as good as the older ones. I just re-read my statement, and it's pretty clear that I was talking about Jacobs.
--
Jeff

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On 12/13/2015 5:51 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Sorry about that. Thanks for setting me straight. At 76 I sometimes I misunderstand. Re-reading your comment makes it all clear now. IIRC some of the older consumer grade Jacobs weren't all that good either. Like on cheap drills and such.
I found out early on that spending a bit more on quality tools can save you a lifetime of aggravation.
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wrote:

Yikes! >$600 for a woodworking drill press chuck seems a bit excessive, though.
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On 12/13/2015 8:06 PM, krw wrote:

I payed about $120 for my Albrecht 1/32-1/2" J2 back in 85. Inflation takes it's toll. I did buy mine for metal work. I've seen some going for ~ $335 lately so look around. It maybe overkill for most wood workers.
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On 12/13/2015 4:54 PM, gray_wolf wrote:

.
And 30 years old. ;~)
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