New Planer Trick? Or did I simply think of the wheel on my own?

While making tpo rails for our new deck, I thought that "crowning" them would help rain an snow run off. Last time, I ran the two bys through the TS twice with the blade set at 5 degrees or so.
This time, I pulled out the jig I'd made to create a sloped sill out of that plastic deck board material (I needed it to match the edge of the sliding glass door sill and slope downward therefrom for the same reason factory sills do it.
I had some slick plywood sign board material with a slick plastic facing and cut it to less than the width of my planer by quite a bit and wide enough to hold the six-inch wide deck board (face down) between two low guide strips. Underneath this jig, on one side (left), I fastened a little strip of wood thick enough to raise the one edge of the sled/jig enough to allow removing the requisite amount of material from the back side of the deck (Composite - that's what they call it) board to provide the maximum amount of slope over the three or four inches of exposed "sill" I required.
Worked like a charm. I cut the result to fit up and under the Sliding Glass Door (Patio Door) sill and lay nicely upon and over the brick facing with it's pretty detailed "factory finish" side up and proud.
For the deck railing, I needed to slope both sides from the middle (I was using two-by material - Cull PT Lumber 50% off list). I added another low guide strip to match the smaller width of the 4-inch material and added a quarter-inch or so to the strip used for raising the jig for the sill (steeper bevel desired) and ran each of the railings through twice. Turning end - for end, with each pass, then taking a bit more off, repeated the procedure until I was pleased with the result.
Then, I ran each rail through the router a few times. First to create a "drip edge" slot on the underside of the rails (like they do on wooden window sills (or did), then using a round-over bit on all four edges.
Man, they feel great! - Look like something factory-made.
Anyone need P.T. Shavings?
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On 8/28/2011 10:10 PM, Hoosierpopi wrote: ...[description elided for brevity]...
Indeed, you have reinvented a trick... :)
I forget which (very) old industrial arts text has it in it, but I'll see if I can did it up...
--
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I regularly* invent such things only to discover later that I could have read a book had I the library at hand. Then, a couple of my inventions appeared to have been created after mine - would the patent process a bit easier!
* Well, it's been over half a century, now, so "regularly" needs be taken in that context, too.
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On 8/30/2011 8:19 AM, Hoosierpopi wrote:

I did a quick look-see and the volume I was looking for wasn't on the shelf--which means it's probably still never been unpacked since the move from TN and that means it's in one of the many boxes still in the pile...it's not likely I'm going to be moving those _real_soon_now_ although maybe it'll add to the urge come cold weather this winter...
It's the case I can think of the volume by some of the content but I can't dredge up enough of the specifics on it to give a searchable reference...over the years in Lynchburg I picked up a lot of these old references from library culls and a couple of school shop closings/cleanups. IIRC this one came from the Old Dominion U maintenance shops sale where I also picked up an old (early '50s?) Walker-Turner/Delta shaper--interestingly, despite the age, the castings for the fence and some others are identical to those of the Delta HD shaper until very recently; they never changed them other than part numbers...
--
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Some of the newer "composite" decking materials are encased in a pure synthetic casing skin. This was done to avoid further lawsuits that ensued the manufacturers after many installations developed mould that the manufactures claimed "did not harm the structure of the decking". It makes sense that the exposed and encapsulated bits of wood fibres would hold moisture and develop mould, in hindsight. The projected answer was to was the deck in an anti-mould solution two or three times a year to maintain your "maintenance free" expensive deck.
Perhaps you have used an older product not yet advanced to this technology but it would seem you may have recreated this possible mould problem, depending on the environment around it. Lots of sun and frequent drying is a factor for decks without complaints of this.
It would be interesting to see how "breaking the seal" works out for you in a few years.
-------------------------------- "Hoosierpopi" wrote in message
While making tpo rails for our new deck, I thought that "crowning" them would help rain an snow run off. Last time, I ran the two bys through the TS twice with the blade set at 5 degrees or so.
This time, I pulled out the jig I'd made to create a sloped sill out of that plastic deck board material (I needed it to match the edge of the sliding glass door sill and slope downward therefrom for the same reason factory sills do it.
I had some slick plywood sign board material with a slick plastic facing and cut it to less than the width of my planer by quite a bit and wide enough to hold the six-inch wide deck board (face down) between two low guide strips. Underneath this jig, on one side (left), I fastened a little strip of wood thick enough to raise the one edge of the sled/jig enough to allow removing the requisite amount of material from the back side of the deck (Composite - that's what they call it) board to provide the maximum amount of slope over the three or four inches of exposed "sill" I required.
Worked like a charm. I cut the result to fit up and under the Sliding Glass Door (Patio Door) sill and lay nicely upon and over the brick facing with it's pretty detailed "factory finish" side up and proud.
For the deck railing, I needed to slope both sides from the middle (I was using two-by material - Cull PT Lumber 50% off list). I added another low guide strip to match the smaller width of the 4-inch material and added a quarter-inch or so to the strip used for raising the jig for the sill (steeper bevel desired) and ran each of the railings through twice. Turning end - for end, with each pass, then taking a bit more off, repeated the procedure until I was pleased with the result.
Then, I ran each rail through the router a few times. First to create a "drip edge" slot on the underside of the rails (like they do on wooden window sills (or did), then using a round-over bit on all four edges.
Man, they feel great! - Look like something factory-made.
Anyone need P.T. Shavings?
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On 8/28/2011 11:10 PM, Hoosierpopi wrote:

The last time I did this, I didn't have a planer and it was a PIA to run a 12' 2x6 through the TS with a taper cut. Planer sounds good.
Here is a link showing a jig for this, is this what you did?
http://tinyurl.com/3ru6b8u
http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-plans/jointing-and-planing/auxiliary-planer-bed /
--
Jack
I cut it twice and it's still too short.
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You got any pictures ????
On 8/28/2011 11:10 PM, Hoosierpopi wrote:

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