New guard designs

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Speaking of mangled digits, I was at a friend's house a few years back. He knew my love of woodworking and took me to the basement to show me his shop. Along the wall was a Sears RAS and I commented to him that while I had used mine frequently, that it always scared me for some reason. I told him that I'd learned to pull the truck out using my body and not my arm: I would lock my elbow and wrist, then use the weight of my body to pull the truck out and across the wood. I explained that this seemed to help prevent the blade from binding and "climbing" across a thinner piece.
He smiled and held up his left thumb, or what was left of it, to show me he understood the issue.
--
Nonny

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New saws, Leon. I don't think they are easily adapted because of the riving knife requirement. The fact that it is easily removed and replaced takes away the argument that it does not work well with jigs so you leave it off all the time. Although it still may not work with jigs. I've only seen a couple of photos in the magazine.
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Darn,,,, I was hoping you were going to say aftermarket. I have seen the new ones, IIRC SawStop was probably the first, maybe the Powermatic 2000, and Jet has one and Delta has the newer design on the current Unisaw.
IIRC the guards are still basically the same idea but better built, read that as what appears to be more impressive engeneering rather than the stamped and folded variety that came with most saws in the past. AND they are quite easy to remove and replace.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I never saw him with a guard on his TS, nor do I recall him ever mentioning that he removed it for clarity of his demonstration.
I installed the guard on my Delta hybrid when I got it three years ago. It was removed in the first week and hasn't been back on since.
I try to think through every cut in advance of turning on the saw, asking myself how the sumbitch can hurt me and making sure I handle the piece accordingly.
Larry
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He mentioned it during the Table Saw series. He basically said they took the guard off for TV clairity, but it was your choice whether to use the guard or not. (This is from my memory. For a direct word for word quote, contact LRod.)
Puckdropper
--
Is it human error or bad design?

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On Sun, 15 Nov 2009 12:15:34 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@teranews.com"

Actually, all his shows comment right at the end that guards are removed for photographic purposes.
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I would definately use the guard if it would stay out of the way. The trouble I have with mine is it's so fiddly to adjust it can actually make things worse. The work piece starts to bind against the fence and guard requiring more force to push through the blade, and we all know that's a bad thing.
Plus, if I take it off for a non-through cut, there's no positive registration to get it back where it needs to be. The design is letting me down.
Puckdropper
--
Is it user error, or bad design?

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No.
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On Sun, 15 Nov 2009 12:36:23 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The problem of course is that some operations can't be done with the guard in place unless you have one of those fancy aftermarket overhead guards.
For example, when I said I was ripping a piece of wood to 2.5", that was somewhat simplified. What I was really doing was ripping 1/4" off of a 3" wide board. With the guard in place, the 1/4" offcut, which was what I wanted, would have fit inside the guard and probably been chewed to bits by the blade.
A riving knife OTOH would be very nice if there was one available for my saw, but there isn't. I do use a splitter but that has to be removed in order to make a cut that doesn't go all the way through.
Since my accident, I have been considering some way to suspend my guard an inch above the table. With the strange design of my ancient Delta it just might be doable.
Damm it's hard to type with one thumb wrapped up like a mummy. You wouldn't believe how many times I've hit backspace to write this!
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Larry
I believe this was mentioned before but the product at this web page http://www.microjig.com/ is very useful in the situation you described. I bought two of these when I got back into woodworking after a 30 year haitus and find them to be one of the most useful safety tools in the shop. They allow you to keep constant downward pressure on a rip cut all the way to the completion of the cut.
Russ

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