new Craftsman table saws

Does anyone out there have one of these new generation Craftsman with the inboard mounted motor?
I looked at the professional model with the Biesemeyer fence but noted that the fence was engaged only at the front and could be moved when pushed at the rear.
I am considering replacing my 22 year old Craftsman and would like to make a good choice since this would probably be the last table saw I buy.
My old one had some glaring weaknesses: a belt drive that turned a pulley wheel which was always making noise and then coming off. It was held on the motor shaft with a small metal moon shaped "key" set screwed into a slot in the motor shaft. What a troublesome thing it has been, and very noisy to operate.
I hope the new belt drives are a bit different.
Thank guys.
RonT
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I happened to be at Sears this evening and took a look at one of them. It was the one with the full enclosure cabinet (Sears item #00922124000) and had a price in the mid - $900 range. For the money I would look at a Grizzly 1023 series or a Jet contractor saw with accessories. They claim the Sears weighs around 438 pounds but it must all be in table top. I took a look inside and the trunnions won't hold a candle to the saws mentioned above. A step above their old contractor-type table saw of the 70's but not a huge step.
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The 2004-1005 Craftsman catalog lists the saw at $850. The Sears where I bought mine in late September honored that price. In addition, Sears has a variety of sales (Craftsman days and Sears credit card holder sales). If you are lucky to purchase on a day with both sales running, you can get another 19% off the $850. At this price, the Craftsman is arguably a better value than Grizzly. I haven't used any contractor saw, but I suspect most contractor saws will fall short of either the Craftsman with its Biesemeyer fence or the Grizzly 1023 with its ShopFox classic fence.

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get another 19% off <<<
And if you are a Sears retiree as I am you get an additional 10% off the above. :-)
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 22:55:51 -0500, Rob Mills wrote:

Was that a gloat, or a confession? ;^)
--
Joe Wells


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Definite gloat. Last spring just as they were coming out with the new cabinet saws I purchased one that they were closing out, forget the model number but it was the one with casters and cast iron extension that would accommodate a router. I wound up paying about $360 for it. I think it retailed for about seven something originally. I probably use a table saw a half dozen times a year so it will serve my purposes well. RM ~
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Hello Ron and group, You're dead wrong about this new Craftsman Professional saw! I bought one of the first ones to come out and I can tell you it is a very well designed piece of equipment. The saw is heavy yes with almost no vibration whatever. The trunnions, if you look, are built like a tank. The cast iron top is machined well and is very smooth. The B-meyer fence is wonderful all on it's own , but makes this saw just a little more special than many out there. I have been using mine since last June and it suprises me how much I like it. The fence and souped up mitre bar really have made for a great deal of accuracy in the cuts. The power is totally adequate for most uses. I will agree that a Pro shop, cutting board after board of thick planks, would benefit from a higher HP motor than this saw delivers, but I have had no problem ripping three inch thick white oak with no bog down and very smooth cuts from the blade supplied, I might add. The enclosed cabinet with the dust collection is terrific. I couldn't ask for more for the price! I got mine on sale and with the Craftsman club discount I paid $760! Remember that the Grizzley needs 220 wiring as well, so figure that into the price if one doesn't already have it. Don't get me wrong, Grizzly's saw is a fine machine and I certainly won't knock anyone for selecting it. What I do object to is folks automatically assuming that this saw is no good just because it a Craftsman made by Sears. I owned an old Sears contractor saw that wasn't the paragon of quality. The fence plain sucked! And I've owned crappy routers etc, like all of us have. But I think Sears is getting the message and putting out some good stuff nowadays. The new Professional router kit for example. It's the Bosch 1617EVS with red trim and a Craftsman label. You can't get much better than that in it's class! So before any of you dismiss this saw just because it Sears...............Think again! Michael
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With respect I did not automatically assume anything based on the fact it was Craftsman. I have owned several Sears and Craftsman tools. Still do.
What I did say is that just that evening I looked at the Craftsman Professional in the store. This included a hands and knees inspection of the innards and trunnions. I still maintain that based on trunnion mass, 3HP motor, overall finish of top, handwheels, etc and a $825 price the Grizzly 1023S might still be a better value.
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On 2004-10-11 21:03:19 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) said:

If the Biesemeyer has been installed properly, the back will only flex when the front is not locked down. With the front locked, the back should be practically unmoveable. Wood magazine (May 2004) had an article on rip fences and rated the Biesemeyer as one of the best in terms of rear deflection (and one of the best overall as well).
BTW, I just purchased the Craftsman-Biesemeyer saw and I am very satisfied. It is a good value for the money, getting you most of what its expensive 3HP cousins have to offer at a much lower price.
You may want to also consider the Grizzly 1023S/L table saw, however.

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Something was wrong. You won't move my Bies once it is locked. The pimply kid that put the sample together must have really screwed up that one.
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<snip>
I took delivery on my 221240 model on Friday and finally got it really de;overed late Monday afternoon. The delay wasn't really Sear's fault; it was really a matter of their bonehead conctractor service!
Well, as it turns out, Lucky Me! I got an extra $40 knocked off of the purchase along with two department managers showing up late in the afternoon to lug that beast into its final resting place!
Their contractor cost me a full weekend in getting the saw set up, but what the heck! Sears came through!
As I melt the packing "grease" off with (the recommended) WD40 and soak the snot out of the polished iron tables with paste wax -- and admire the mellow sheen of the reflections from the newly ground surfaces -- "I think to myself, what a wonderful world".
As I get the beast together there will be more to report. But so far... it's WOW and methinks it's only going to get better (if plausible).
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mextex1 writes:

Why would you push the fence at the rear? Anyway, a properly adjusted Biese is NOT gonna move. Mine sure as hell doesn't. A floor sample, set up by sales people wanting to go home, is not likely to be properly set up.

Machined pulleys for a multigrooved poly belt.
Charlie Self "Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them." George Orwell
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 21:03:19 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ron Truitt) wrote:

A few do - they're getting rave reviews.

"Bies" is considered by many to be the Cadillac of T-style fences. Yes, they lock only at the front. My non-Bies fence has a rear tab and I wish it didn't.
Once properly installed and adjusted, it will *not* be a problem.
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Thanks for the low down fellas.
As usual I got some great info.
RonT
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Been using a REAL Biesmeyer fence for about 15 years now and the ONE THING I WILL NEVER DO is ever buy another fence that locks front and back....No way....!
Mine is rock solid BUT I imagine if I really put my weight to work I could move the back of the fence a little. bit...BUT why would I want to do that...
Just wanted to chime in here and offer my distaste for fences that lock front and back...
Bob Griffiths
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