New Band Saw Questions

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I just got a new Jet 14" closed base band saw. As I was putting it together, I was impressed with the fit and finish of the pieces, esp. after reading some of the comments others have made concerning their new saws, particularly the Delta band saws.
Once I got it all together, I put a straightedge on the 2 wheels that the blade goes around, and found that they were approximately 1/4" out of coplaner. This results in the blade being a bit beyond centered on the upper wheel and a bit before centered on the lower wheel.
The saw seems to cut ok, without excessive noise or vibration - at least I think so. I have never owned a band saw before. Is this a problem? Do I need to call the dealer on Monday?
Thanks, Harvey
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"eclipsme" wrote in message

Apparently that is not untypical with Jet bandsaws, doesn't usually cause a problem, and is most likely nothing to worry about. If the blade tracks well, in the middle of the tires, and you are satisfied with the cut, I would leave it alone.
Many folks screw up perfectly good bandsaws obsessing with getting the wheels exactly "co-planar".
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Measuring wheels that are not coplanar can be tricky. Coplanar wheels are very important for wide blades and when resawing. Sometimes as the tension is changed the wheels will change as well. This may not be an indication of poor quality or design. You should install a wide blade, put it under the proper tension, then measure with a straightedge. There may be a wheel adjustment on the top wheel, sometimes in the center. If the owner's manual does not show an adjustment, call Jet customer support. Monday is a "holiday"--you may have to wait until Tuesday. Anyway, congratulations on getting a band saw! It is a wonderful machine when properly tuned, a frustration when it needs a tune up. Buy "Band Saw Handbook" by Mark Duginske.
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eclipsme wrote:

Leave it alone. I've been there, and made the mistake of "correcting" a BS to coplaner. I had to undo the "correction". the manufacturers know more about building band saws than Duginske. skip his BS about coplaner "corrections".
Dave
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Sounds like a voice of experience . . .
Always wonder about some of these "tune-ups" that are needed according to authors of Woodworking Books . . .
Would we go to Cher for piano repair and tune up expertise?

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Thank you all for the replies. I will try it with a resaw blade - I purchased a 3/4" blade along with the saw for just that purpose. If that works out, I guess I will leave well enough alone.
Harvey
Steve DeMars wrote:

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3/4" is pretty wide for a 14" saw and needs a lot of tension. I use a 1/2" on my Jet.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I want to agree with this. I have a 3/4" for my saw and the saw tensions it just fine, but it is a new saw with a new spring and I imagine I'll have to replace the tension spring sooner than I would if I'd gotten a 1/2" blade for resawing if I hope to keep using the big blade without problems.
er
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Enoch Root wrote:

Thanks. I may have jumped the gun on getting the blade. I saved shipping by ordering it now. That's ok, there are lots of blades out there.
I appreciate all the helpful advice.
Harvey
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I use the 3/4 with my 20 year old spring without a problem. The slim section Suffolk blade. Reasonable feed rates and wood held steady make a huge difference, of course.
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George wrote:

I think I'm using the same blade. Thanks.
er
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George wrote:

Perhaps it also depends on how often the blade is on the saw and for how long? I would think that occasional use (such as mine) would be much less of a potential problem for the tension spring than if the 3/4" blade were used continuously.
Harvey
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eclipsme wrote:

In any case, the Ittura Bandsaw catalog has replacements, and Grizzly keeps lots of parts (speaking to my bandsaw), and I think you may even be able to use springs from kbctools, McMaster-Carr, and similar.
I'm thinking the "Die Springs" could be used, and are very cheap, but I don't know if the medium or heavy duty ones are more appropriate. The medium duty ones have a greater efficient range of deflection, the heavy duty ones (at kbctools) offer greater loads at maximum deflection.
er
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Well, detensioning makes a difference, I should think. Maintaining tension will exacerbate known problems with blade work-hardening as it is continuously bent, and any open any cracks accelerated by corrosion.
I took my lathe work blade off the saw yesterday to do some resawing - slats for the kids' mission-style bed. It's good enough for rough work, but even with my birthday present - Performax drum sander, it pays to have a good blade in the saw. My son-in-law, who had never resawn before did a job that is within one pass with a 120 belt of reality. Back to the less-than fully sharp and narrower blade today.
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George wrote:
SNIP >>> >>> 3/4" is pretty wide for a 14" saw and needs a lot of tension. I use a 1/2" on my Jet. >> >> I want to agree with this. I have a 3/4" for my saw and the saw >> tensions it just fine, but it is a new saw with a new spring and I >> imagine I'll have to replace the tension spring sooner than I would if >> I'd gotten a 1/2" blade for resawing if I hope to keep using the big >> blade without problems. SNIP
I haven't looked into this at all (I use 1/2" or smaller), but I was curious... I've seen lots of discussions about 1/2" vs. 3/4" blades, but for us 14" owners shouldn't there be a blade that splits the difference, like maybe a 5/8" resaw blade? That would let the weaker springs tension it better than a 3/4, but perhaps get better cuts than 1/2"?
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There are 5/8" blades. IIRC Timberwolf sells them in bi-metal versions. Also my short lived Rikon BS came with a 5/8" blade.
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Sure, my local saw shop carries 5/8" blades... I thought that was a common size? Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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In my fumbling education on BS blades, I tried 3/4"... I tried a size at a time and ended up with a 3/8" blade... and I can make straighter cuts with it than the 3/4" blade and it drags a LOT less on my lil' 3/4 hp motor.. That's a major consideration when you're using an under powered saw with 8 or 10 inch thick wood.. Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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mac davis wrote:

So far my biggest problem with the 3/4" blade is starting the cut in hard wood: the first bite into the stock must be made very tentative, or those big 3tpi teeth will grab hard and jerk--deeper and it'll stop the motor! Then it's modest feed rate (for the 1hp motor) and smooth sailing.
er
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