Need help with pumice technique

Several years ago I made a lightbox. It was the my first experience with woodworking. I got some tips from the shop where I purchased the wood (not in the USA) but have since forgotten the steps...I was able to get a satin/waxy/matte finish by hand.
I was very happy with the results and want to make another one...
What I remember:
I used a maple plywood... I "think" I used some kind of oil for a very light natural staining... (any suggestions?) I then used varying grades of sandpaper... Then again I "think" I melted paraffin wax, poured it directly onto the surface, then sprinkled pumice powder on that...then rubbed it onto the surface in small areas with a rag or something...
Does this sound right? How about the order of the steps? Are there any other materials/tech that you would recommend? I read about "Rotten Stone" - what does that do?
I see that pumice is sold in solid bars - how is it used or should I stick to the powder?
Thanks for the help...
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RR wrote:

My guess would be "Boiled Linseed Oil"

Are you sure you didn't dissolve shellac flakes in alcohol for this process?

Pumice is often used with shellac to fill the pores of the wood. Once the pores are filled additional coats of shellac are added without using the pumice. Do a "Google" search for "French Polish".

It's an abrasive powder finer than pumice used to "rub out" a finish after the final coat has been applied and allowed to cure.

Stick with the powder. It comes in various grades, "F" through "FFFF" with "FFFF" being the finest.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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