Moving to Australia and need to know...

Hi all
Does anyone know if there is a inverter or transformer (not sure what they would be called) that will allow me to bring my 120 volt and 240volt 60hertz tools to Australia. I'd like to bring the drills, drill press, jointer, planer... with me if its possible to run them down there. So I guess this "machine" would have to handle up to 35amps 240volt and 20amps for 120volt. FYI their power is 240volt 50hertz.
Thx Mat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
If you need 20Amps 120V out then you will only need 10A 240 volts in, or thereabouts. Sorry if I misunderstand your post.

***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many motors in stationery tools could be converted to the higher voltage but the big problem is they are not designed for 50hz power. Universal tools can handle the 50hz but not the voltage. You will need a device that will convert both the higher voltage to 120v and change the frequency, this may be hard to find ready made. The old way would be a motor coupled to a generator (often wired together within a motor/generator) or the modern way with transformers, rectifiers and electronic frequency control.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eric Tonks wrote:

Pens and pencils with motors ;-) (sorry, couldn't resist it)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, I, of all people should know better having worked in the printing and stationery business for 40 years -- maybe that is why spelling it that way just slips through the keyboard.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then there are printing presses -- electric plus pneumatic plus *open*flame* gas-fired -- all in the *same* tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Old Nick wrote:

I think that he meant that he has 240 volt tools that take up to 35 amps and 120 volt tools that take up to 20 amps.
A transformer's not all that big a problem. The difficulty comes with the frequency conversion, which requires an inverter or a motor generator and neither of those is going to be cheap in the capacity required.
That's 10.8 KW total but they're inductive loads so there will be a relatively high startup current. _Simplest_ solution might be to just bring a US-spec gasoline or natural-gas powered generator with sufficient output, but that will probably end up costing more than simply replacing the tools.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 08:34:07 -0400, "J. Clarke"
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

AH! OK. I was looking only at the "machine" ind its ins and outs.
Freqauency's the biggest trouble still. The 240 Volts machines would not _need_ conversion except for this.
I think that before I bought _anything_ that would solve the problem, I'd be looking at freight vs simply selling and re-buying, or maybe simply replacing the motors where needed if freight is realistic on the machinery.
Trouble is, if you sell a secondhand table saw in the US and get, what, 400- 500 US for it(?), IME you will then pay nearly $1000 US to buy a new one here, and probably US$600 secondhand.
I know that sometimes you can do better or worse than this, but it will cost. The difference in price is not covered by the conversion factor, or the freight, or GST. It's called profit, in a small market :-< ***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
http://www.dvdoverseas.com/store/index.html?catalog6_0.html
But if you use only a transformer, all of your tools will run at 83.33% speed, and this may not be good, either for the motors or for the working of the tool.
You would need an inverter to get true 120V 60Hz. That could get expensive.

***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unless you are military and/or get free shipping, sell your tools and buy them again here. You'll get more for your dollar. What's more, you can take 240v machines home to the US if you return.
Transformers are not worth the hassle IMHO. I have slowly re-converted everything back to 240v from 110v and wish I'd stayed with just one standard.
--

Greg


"john smith" < snipped-for-privacy@microsoft.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The 220v tools will work OK. If you have Porter Cable stuff, check as a lot can be quickly changed over to 220v by swaping a few wires, as can a lot of 'stationary' machinery. You will however need new plugs. Western Australia runs closer to 265v BTW.
The 110v tools are more of a PITA. How soon do you intend going back to the USofA, if ever? IF you are only here for a few years, consider leaving the tools boxed up with relatives/friends, then reclaim them when you return. If you are planing a trip in the decades/forever category you may be better off selling them & buying locally.
I have a 20amp 110v transformer - it is about a foot on a side & had to be custom made (I bought it 2nd hand). Inverters cost $$$. At least your US$ is still worth about $1.50 Australian.
Luckily hand tools, drill & router bits still work;-) But you will have to get used to the local half-baked metric system - most things are still packed/sold in near Imperial sizes - Timber in 30cm increments instead of feet (30.5cm)
Local suppliers worth looking at from a 'buy it local' P.O.V. are:
Carbatec: www.carbatec.com.au
MIK: www.mik.com.au
Total Tools: www.toolies.com.au
Gregory Machinery (Jet): www.gmcompany.com.au
There are others, depending on where you are going to be based.
also introduce yourself on the local Woodies forum: http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au
Just think - heat stroke for Christmas!
enjoy Bruce
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Easy Answer: Check the nameplate. The nameplate will tell you whether or not the motors can be run at 50Hz.
Better Answer: Sell 'em and buy new down there. Shipping will run you a TON.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
you could also sell your motors, and ship the now lighter machinery, and use the money to buy new motors...?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I lived in the US for 4 1/2 years and bought a lot of power tools before moving back to NZ. Good quality tools, Makita, DeWalt, PC etc, are considerably cheaper in the US. El-cheapo chiwanese stuff is approx the same price, so that may alter your decision to bring or replace.
Anyway, any "universal" motor, used in planers, chopsaws, jigsaws, biscuit joiners, drills, etc will run fine via a 230-115 vac transformer, as do battery chargers for cordless tools.
Synchronous motors, usually 1 HP or greater used in bandsaws, table saws, etc will also run via a transformer, but most can be rewired (just change two links) to run off 220 vac, However, they are running at 50 Hz instead of 60 Hz so they run slower, and the motor will run hotter, so you may not be able to get the same power out of it.
Nevertheless, my Jet 18" BS with a 2HP motor and a large bench grinder with a 0.75HP run just fine at 50Hz, sometimes for hours. The BS was just rewired, and the grinder runs thru a transformer.
An inverter will give you 115vac 60 Hz, but they cost $$$$$$$.
Barry Lennox
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Are 230 to 115 vac transformers readily available down under.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

Sorry, but have you read _any_ of the other replies (a couple of which _are_ mine I admit)?
Anyway, search the web. I found and posted examples for you, aftera few minutes' looking. I think you will find that the answer is "no", not in the size you want. ***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know how it would help you but 230 - 115 volt transformers are abundant at army installations in the FRG. You might also check with the Surplus Center, 900 West "O" street, Lincoln, Nebraska. I bought a 2400 watt model from them many years ago which I took to the FRG with me. Don't know what they might have today, if anything. (This transformer was an autotransformer, useful in either direction - step up or step down.) rhg
Old Nick wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, they are available, but you probably pay more than in the USA. I was at one stage working with several Aust navy types, and they were buying 230-115vac transformers like hot cakes, they had got hold of some reseller (in VT) of chinese made ones, I bought one as well, about USD65 for a 3.5 KVA one. Significantly cheaper than here, and thus far has never missed a beat, even when drawing 5KVA for short periods.
Barry Lennox
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.