Mobile bases for router & tablesaw

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My inital project is going to be a cedar strip canoe. I have 1/2 of a small 2 car garage for a shop space. I have a BT3100 table saw and a Rockler router table that are not yet assembled. I am interested in putting these on mobile bases. The center of the shop will be taken up with the strongback.
Is there a source for for bases that work like typewriter tables? They have wheels and a mechanism that lift the table up to roll and lowers the table to allow the feet to support the table.
Any ideas?
Thanks,
RT
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Sure, look at your favorite tool outlet for mobile bases.
http:/google.com
search for mobile base table saw.
-Jack
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On 28-Aug-2003, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Funjumper101) wrote:

I have one on my 14" bandsaw. It's a Portamate. It is adjustable in base size, so you can fit it to many different bases. Only two wheels lift and lower, so when down, the base is on two wheels and two feet. It is more solid than I'd have expected - the wheels are solid and the base doesn't wiggle much.
The bases are available in several weight capacity/size combinations and priced accordingly. The PM1000 is small (up to 300 lb) and up to 31" square or 19"x43" rectangle. I've seen tham at my local Home Depot.
Mike
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Why do you people always solve everything by buying more crap? Get with it and show some All-American ingenuity, man!! Buy or scavenge a set of rollers or caster wheels and build a damn stand!! Hint: circle your tool base with wood and then place boards under and across that with the casters below. Some thinking and basic measuring will show you the way, and if that ain't Barbie 'n' Ken enough for you, then paint it gray.
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PirateBob,
When you price a set of casters and figure in the time to build the stand it works out better if you just buy one. I was going to build one for my table saw, but it cost more to buy the casters, nuts, bolts, angle iron than to buy a premade one.
-Jack
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Mine is a ring or 26 around the bottom of the saw legs. 2 more 26 laid flat and screwed across and beneath that ring makes the wheel mount. Casters were snatched from a junk pile at work.If you need lockers, then look a little longer and grab them. If not, tap a little wedge between the wheel and sheave. Nuts and carriage bolts were laying in jars and bins in my garage for years already, glad to use them p. Total time: 2hrs.
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<Secret> wrote in message> 2293.public.lawson.webtv.net:

little
laying
Well, unless you have someone that pays you for your spare time, then you are correct - the answer is zero.

just
me
problems
that
Kind of boils down to you spend your spare time the way you want and he'll spend it the way he wants.
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I've never had a problem finding ways to turn a profit from my spare time activities. They are often far more profitable than going to work. But that is irrelevant, perhaps your time has no value to you. MY time has considerable value to me, as there is precious little of it available.
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<Secret> wrote in message> 2293.public.lawson.webtv.net:

With an outlook like that, why would you do any woodworking at all? Everything you've ever made has likely been made by someone else and is just as likely forsale somewhere cheaper than what you could make at your job. The joy is in the making, the fixing and the sense of accomplishment, not a cost/time ratio based against your job. With your outlook, it must be really difficult to construct anything.
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--WebTV-Mail-4842-14360 Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
I agree with Upscale, and as I have said before, why bother at all with all the bullshit. Save yourself a few grand and buy the damn birdhouse. Nobody's paying you for that, either
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I agree with the squirrel on this one...Not everyone enjoys making all of their shop equipment; they've got their eye on the furniture making, or whatever wood projects suit their fancy. Some guys will scrounge around for weeks or months for a used motor, pulleys, switches, wire, brackets, pulleys, nuts/bolts, belts, framistans, doohickeys, thingamjigs, whatchacallits, etc instead of shelling out $89 for a belt sander. To each his own. Try not to be so critical of those who focus their energies in this endeavor we all refer to as "Woodworking". Narrow-mindedness never solved anything.
dave
Upscale wrote:

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I must say this is a strange thread. I may have come in a bit late on the subject, but in my view....money is time and time is money. It's just what value each individual puts on each that determine their avenue of approach to things. One thing for sure, attacking each other in this manner is just a waste of time, energy and if one sees fit to include...money. Wouldn't you rather be planning or building your next woodworking project (whatever it may be) than bickering over the perception of what's more important...money or time.
DM
2293.public.lawson.webtv.net:

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Group: rec.woodworking Date: Tue, Sep 2, 2003, 3:46pm (EDT+4) From: snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com (Upscale) <Secret> wrote in message
2293.public.lawson.webtv.net: And the value of that time is what? 0? I'm all for do it yourself and being inventive, but sometimes it's just frivolous. I could put in 2 hours of overtime, and make FAR more than what the cost of the factory built base is, purchase the purpose-built welded steel item and still have money left over. More-over with spare time being at a premium, I'd rather work on the projects that interest me than spend time dicking around trying to cobble up solutions to problems that have already been solved. I suspect that I'm far from alone in that With an outlook like that, why would you do any woodworking at all? Everything you've ever made has likely been made by someone else and is just as likely forsale somewhere cheaper than what you could make at your job. The joy is in the making, the fixing and the sense of accomplishment, not a cost/time ratio based against your job. With your outlook, it must be really difficult to construct anything. ****************************************************** Upscale ~ I got into this thread a little late but I had to remark that you wrote the above reply very well indeed. It so happens that I make my own bases from scrap pieces of 2x4 or 2x3 and use mortise and tenon joints just for the fun of it. Then I attach two fixed casters and two swivel ones. The finishing touch is a spring loaded foot-operated door stop to keep it from rolling while I'm using the machine. It costs me less than a cheap store bought one and I can look at it and say, "I made that!". Isn't this what woodworking is all about?
Peace ~ SirEdgar
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<Secret> wrote in message>

If that fits your life style, good for you. Perhaps the OP is retired and cannot work OT to buy his toys;. but he has plenty of time.
We all get satisfaction from woodworking or we would not be here. Some of my most satisfying days in the shop are when I produce just about nothing physical, but did have a good idea for "next time". Or spent 30 minutes making a jig to save 5 minutes time, but it works soooo goood!.
Today, I brought some wood home from work. It is soft wood, dunnage from an import shipment. I spent time to resaw it, I'm going to plane it, and finally cut it for something useful. I can get the same board feet of wood very cheap and possibly better quality at t he BORG. Why bother?
It is very satisfying to show people a piece of the rough lumber from a shipping pallet made into an outdoor table. I get more oooh's and aaah's than if it was made from ebony. Keep in mind, you are not given points based on the number of projects or the amount of wood you used.
It is not the destination, it is the journey. Ed
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That was the exact point I was making though, and which some people seem to have missed. Time has a value. For some that value is low. They have plenty available, and perhaps not alot of funds available. Or perhaps they simply enjoy the tinkering. Others have to place a premium on time as there is just not enough available and the time taken from activities they enjoy, or the projects that are important to them justifies the expense spent on purchasing whatever the item in question was.     Sadly, the myopic majority that seems to spend all of their time flaming posts in newsgroups took that as some sort of an affront to their sensibilties instead of what is was : One man's opinion on the original posters question.
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If it's a Delta mobile base, it isn't "crap". Same goes for a few of the other bases on the market. dave
RM MS wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (ToolMiser) wrote in

If you have access to a welder it is pretty easy to build your own. I welded a frame using angle iron(such that the flat part faces in). The equipment legs then set on the angle iron. If additional room is needed for the legs, add a bit of flat steel. This arrangement lets the tool sit flat on the floor. The "tricky" bit is to cut a piece of ~2' long angle and weld a ~2" wheel to it near the back. Drill a hole through the back and through the back of the base and use a shoulder bolt as a pivot bolt to connect the wheel to the base. (one on each side of course). When in use, the wheels hold their piece of angle iron up at about a 45 degree angle. When ready to move, just pull the angle down. I put a bolt in the front of each leg/cabinet for the angle iron to slip under and hold the rear wheels in place.
To lift the front up, I put an eye bolt in the center of the front base. I then welded a 4" wheel to some square tube and a hook to the tupe in front of the wheel. I can now just slip the hook into the eye bolt, pull down on the handle and move it around like a tricycle.
It is a pretty simple design but the tools stay flat on the floor without moving around under pressure. I also don't have a big wheel sticking out in front of all the equipment. It is more trouble than it is worth for only one machine, but with my small shop I need to move them all when working with 8' lumber.
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Funjumper101 wrote:

If you're near a Harbor Fright store, look at this mobile base: <http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberA915> It seems to go on sale pretty often for about half price. I've got my BT3100 on one.
-- Steve
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jets new moble base is excellent just what your looking for

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I solved all those problems, and mine don't raise the equip. more than 1/2" offthe floor either. Dang, man, I got to tell you how to do everything? Think, think, THINK!!
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