Milwaukee 0234-6 Magnum 5.5 Amp 1/2-Inch Dril

Page 1 of 2  
I'm about to move into my first house--my wife and I already picked out the washer and dryer so I"m starting to shop for the important stuff (like maybe a Grizzly 1023 Table saw).
Is the drill I mentioned in the subject line a good "general purpose" household drill? I already have a lightweight, battery operated "convenience" drill (which doesn't quite have enough torque to fully seat a 1" screw in a 4 by 4).
I'm think that a good wired drill will last me a good long time, longer than the battery in any battery operated model. The Milwaukee 0234-6 received very good reviews at amazon.com. I lack the experience to know whether this is possibly "too much" drill. Is this a decent drill to use for simple woodworking and household use? I noticed a reviewer faulted it for not having high enough RPM (0-850). Is this drill much heavier than a 3/8" model? Should I possibly choose a 3/8" drill instead because it would probably be sufficient? For the marginal difference in the price of this tool, I'd rather have "good" than "good enough".
Thank you for any comments/suggestions, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that it is a good drill for drilling large holes, deck screws etc where a lot of torque is required. It may not be so good for general purpose use, as it may be "too strong" and could cause you to sprain your wrist if something binds. I use a smaller drill (Black and Decker) for general purpose stuff. I have a similar (to what you mention) DeWalt drill and try to use it only when really necessary. If possible, I would have two drills, one for general drilling, and another, stronger one like this Milwaukee, for more rare cases like driving long deck screws, etc. If you do go that route and buy a smaller general purpose drill, you may find that a keyless chuck is a big time saver.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Might want to give this some more thought. I own two 14.4 volt Makita portables, a 14.4 volt impact driver and a wired Bosch. The Bosch is about 5-6 years old and sits in its box looking like new. One of the Makita's looks like a well-worn stock car and the other two are heading that way. Message-the wired drill gets to be a hassle. Always looking for an extension cord or plug in. Also, it causes the same problem that Ignoramus mentioned - a whole lot of torque. On occasions when I need more time that the battery will provide; or I need the power it usually tries to twist my wrist or slam my fingers against an adjacent object before I remember what I'm doing. If you are going corded, I would suggest a low end, lower powered machine. You might not use it as much as you think.
BTW - I have owned a 1023S for about seven years and love it. Great machine.
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

I have this drill. It's built like a tank, and it's quite heavy relative to your standard cordless unit. The quality is typical American-made Milwaukee; nearly flawless and built to last a lifetime (and beyond). That said, I rarely use it if my cordless (14V Porter Cable) can do the job. Unless I need to bore a hole clear through a 4x4 with a 1" auger bit (which this drill can *easily* handle) it's very often just too much drill for the job. That's not to say I'd recommend the 3/8" model instead; if you're going to get a corded drill don't cut yourself short - by all means get the 1/2" model (and Amazon's current price of $109 is a great deal). Just don't fool yourself into thinking you're going to use it all the time.
Sounds to me like the lightweight drill you have is not enough, and if you get this one you'll have "too much" AND "not enough". You might first consider a good, strong, reliable 3/8" cordless drill to cover the majority of your general purpose needs, then come back and get the 1/2" Milwaukee later on (unless you can afford both now, then by all means!). Others can probably do a better job of recommending a cordless; I may be in the market for one myself pretty soon and I haven't been keeping on what the best choices are...
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

IMHO, no.
That drill is a real "Hoss".
If you want a heavy duty 1/2" drill, consider a right angle unit.
At least that way you won't jam your wrists when that big hole saw jams or some other large load doesn't want to cooperate.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, that's why right angle drills are so popular with you guys. Problem is, that right angle gear set robs a lot of power. They're very inefficient. Besides, many 1/2" drills have large double handles perpendicular to the drill axis just to control all that torque. My only Mikita is a 1/2" drill motor. Got more handles than a usenet troll! ;)
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After the first time a 4" hole saw jams and twists your wristsn with a straight drive, nobody has to smack you up side your head to get your attention next time.

So?
They have torque to burn.

Try standing on your head drilling a 4" hole thru a set of floors, 16" on centers, in a boat hull.
It's all ass holes and elbows, no room for handles.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed. That's a tuffy.

I'll learn. ;)
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you for all of the replies to my question. They confirmed my concern that the drill is unnecessarily powerful than I have a use for at this time, and provided me with other helpful information.
1. I don't wish to enflame anyone, but does Craftsman (Sears) make a good "general purpose" household drill, or should I avoid them?
2. Same question as above, but for drill press.
As I haven't had access to a garage in 30 years, I'm virtually starting from scratch in power tools.
I have another question. I'll live in central Indiana and I'll have an attached garage (brick if that matters). Would large and small tools left in an environment like that generally be safe from corrosion (rust)?
When I grew up near Detroit, my dad told me not to make the mistake he did of leaving his tools (wrenches) out in his external garage as they all became quite rusty. Of course, they were not plated like those you would buy today.
Will I need to do something "extra" to protect a tool like a table saw or a drill from corrosion? Or should I leave the drills, and maybe especially the batteries, in the house?
Thank you for any comments, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

S&R may get back to where they were 60 years ago, but why wait?
Milwaukee, Bosch, DeWalt all have decent equipment at a fair price.

RE: Indiana
Somewhere along 24 (Peru, Wabash, Logansport)?
Properly stored tools are not a problem; however, I'd keep batteries inside.
Winter weather is low humidity, so store up off the ground in containers that won't sweat.
Cast iron surfaces, T/S, drill press, etc, need to be coated and then DO NOT store things on top of these surfaces.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lew, I live closer to Indianapolis. Thank you for your suggestions! After reading them I think I'll be storing my smaller tools in sealed plastic containers resting on milk crates or plastic shelves.
I wish to thank all of you for the tool suggestions too--I've got a lot of "pent-up" wood cutting to do! I'll start off with a few bird feeders (which is certain to please my wife) and work towards a few luthery (instrument) projects I've been reading about for a few years.
The current owner of the house has truly the biggest (machinists) vise I have ever seen, bolted to a workbench (maybe it's for working on his RV?). I just hope that he leaves the bench!
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

Along that stretch of 24, my guess is that I have a relative living in about every 10th house, most of whom I've never met.
Get some desiccant packs and you are good to go.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about these dessicant packets? This seems like quite a supply. Does a gram of dessicant per cubic-foot seem about right? Is there a better place to buy it--I didn't see it at Woodcraft's or Rockler's website. Sorry for all the questions.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)45045328&sr=8-8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Reviews of Bostik Top-Coat (sealent) at amazon.com seem to be quite mixed. Ordinary car wax seems to be a popular alternative. Well, I know a lot more than I did yesterday...
Hope everyone is protecting their garage-bound tools (from rust)! I'll keep reading!
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I use plain old Johnson's Paste Wax on the cast iron surfaces of my TS, Jointer, etc. Ordinary car wax might work ok, but there's been a lot of cautionary tales about being sure there's no silicones in the wax. Never experienced it myself, but reports are, silicone transfer to the wood causes fisheye problems in the finish.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

I just went and read some of those. The 4 & 5 star reports were accurate. The 1 star I read was silly, and could only be true if the guy got hold of a can of water instead of topcote. I used wax in my old shop that had a major water problem, and it didn't work. I used a product from 3M that is no longer sold, but I think Topcote is about the same thing, but I can't test it in my old shop, but can tell you in my new shop, (less wet) it is behaving the same as the old 3m product. Anyone that says it is not slick is either lying or doing something very wrong.
I always clean my tops with lacquer thinner just before coating, to insure it is clean and dry. I don't use my shop as much as I used to, but the old 3M stuff lasted about 6 months or more with daily use of my tools, but no where near production use. Now, I use them very little, so can't tell you how durable Topcote is under heavy use, but, it is still perfect after a year of light use, no rust, still slick as sh*t!

Car wax is just wax, unless it has silicone in it. Silicone seems to help wax a lot when it comes to rust prevention and slickness. Woodworkers generally avoid it (silicone) like the plague. Johnsons wax is what many use, it has no silicone. I personally like Topcote. I never tried the other products like Boeshield T9 or Empire TopSaver and they are likely just as good as Topcote or better. For my use, I don't need anything better than Topcote.
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<Snip>
I have only had my Unisaw for four months or so but so far Boeshield is working fine. I live in E. Alabama and the saw lives in the garage, so it's not in a very kind environment. Boeshield is not as slick as I'd like it to be, though. It also seems to take some care to keep it up. It's pretty soft (like a wax) so the miter gauge scratches through the "waxy" surface to what appears to be bare metal. I may try Topcote if I can find it somewhere (I have to buy most everything over the Internet and shipping gets to be a killer).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Where along US24? I used to live in Wabash from '58 to '83.
Dave Nagel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"David G. Nagel" wrote:

Have an aunt & uncle who lived in Peru until death.
Have an uncle who was the farm mgr at White's Institute in Wabash for many years before his death.
My parents met at the Long Cliff hospital in Wabash where they both worked.
My grand parents and several uncles are buried in Logansport.
Have some cousins around Burnetsville.
There's more, those are just the ones that come quickly to mind.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Correction:
I wrote:

Should read Logansport, not Wabash.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.