matching Stickley finish

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What kind of dye, toller? DO they make a wood dye, per se, or are you talking about something else?
Thx
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Vague superficial answers aren't good enough?
I used a mix of 3 parts Transfast Extra Dark Walnut and 1 part Antique Cherry Red; water soluble dye. Bought it at WoodCrafter Supply. I then put Minwax gel Mahogany over it.
I am sure you can get the right color with different dyes and stains. The important point is that I found using both a dye and a stain gave exactly the same appearance as the Stickley finish; which I presume is a tinted lacquer.
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toller wrote:

Ah yes, exactly what I thought you meant...
--

FF


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OF COURSE!!! Why didn't I see that right away - my bad.
Thanx :)
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What's the purpose of using cherry, only to cover it up with "brown dye and mahogany stain"? The same effect could have been achieved with dye and stain over poplar or soft maple, at one-third the cost - and you wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

So do it right - it's a cheap technique and G Stickley wrote it up personally. If you can't find reasonable descriptions of it on-line with 30 seconds Google, then you're not trying.
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http://musial.ws/fuming.htm
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peter wrote:

Try adding a glaze between the stain and clear coats. A glaze will darken overall, but also build up in the nooks and crannies, adding to the "antique" look. Darkened clear coats can also be used with or without the glaze, to sneak up on the final look.
Use dewaxed shellac, like Zinnser Seal Coat, or some other universal sanding sealer between the stains, glazes, and clear coats. The sealer will prevent each step from messing with the last, and even provide a measure of "undo", in case you make a mistake.
Practice and note each step on some stock leftover from the project, or a hidden area on the piece, before trying them for the first time.
Barry
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Ammonia fuming is the traditional method. Don't want to try that? Then might I suggest you go to your local library and look at the article starting on page 48 of BHG Wood issue #158, that's the October 04 issue. It details how Alan Noel of Atlanta acheives the look of ammonia fumiong using a staining technique employing Minwax Red Oak stain and unfibered roofing ashphalt a 4:1 ration in mixing I believe.
D. Mo
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D. Mo wrote:

Thats what I was going to suggest. Roofing tar and paint thinner in various ratios gives a whole range of colors for dirt cheap. Sam
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