Making garage doors...

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Anyone have any information, or know of any resources, for making garage doors? I mean, it can't be rocket science...and the prices I'm getting quoted are outrageous...so I think I want to try to make my own. Any suggestions (other than don't do it ;-) or experience appreciated.
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on a related note, I just got back from HD where they do NOT carry any of the hardware used for pivoting wood garage doors. After finding an oil stain on my project from the garage door opener dripping, I tried this morning to pick up the locking handle and side locks. All they carry is stuff for sectional doors.
No one in our area buys wooden doors any longer. They get metal sectionals, usually with windows, and insulation, esp if facing west or south.
dave
Austin Franklin wrote:

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oops, think I left out some salient details, such as: I wanted the hardware in order to remove the electric garage door opener to stop the dripping and give me more overhead clearance for wrestling sheet stock onto the TS.
Bay Area Dave wrote:

snip
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On 17 Nov 2003, Bay Area Dave blathered unto rec.woodworking:

Gesundheit.
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I would not even think about such. The aluminum or sheet metal ones are so light they are a dream to work with compared to the old heavy wooden ones that rot, warp, swell, sag, etc.
On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 13:16:55 -0500, "Austin Franklin"

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wrote:

You might not, but I am ;-) I do not want metal doors. These are custom doors, and have special requirements. I do not want to pay $6k each for < $1k or material. I also don't believe they will be that difficult...but obviously, I will find out.
It's funny how many people I know who will make the most elaborate piece of furniture you can imagine, but want nothing to do with a garage door...for some reason people believe garage doors are difficult, and I just don't believe they are.
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Well, I grew up with sagging, rotten, sprung wooden doors. So forgive me if I don't get excited about it. I do think they look better and even more so if you HAVE to meet an odd sized opening. It would neat if you could find some Paulownia cheap; it is super light, doesn't swell/shrink after drying, very stable wood. They are hard to owrk with by virtue of their size alone. One man usually can't hanle one door with making it twist resulting in a sprung door. I like something I can oick up and move by myself. Look at Sweet's online- they have some doors in there that will knock your eyes out.
http://www.amarr.com / http://sweets.construction.com/index/search2.htm?ad_optionals=off&ad_commun=0&ad_pool=keyword&ad_keyword=garage+doors http://sweets.construction.com/ Do a search on garage doors. They have all the data you need or at least where to get it.
On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 14:36:24 -0500, "Austin Franklin"

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wrote:

Austin,
Questions that come to mind: What size are the doors going to be? What kind of special requirements do you have? Are you thinking about making sections & using standard overhead garage door hardware or one-piece doors w/ standard one-piece hardware?
The type of hardware you are going to use would be the most determining factor of how you make the door slabs or sections and the size (especially width) & the weight of the doors would be the second factor.
Doordoc www.DoorsAndOpeners.com
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Depends on how they are built. I need a garage door that is 6'0" x 6'8". Go to your local garage door company and all they got is 8' wide stuff. OK, I got an 8'0" x 8'6" door and they can't even supply that one. All the one company did is add another panel, but this can't be done with a metal door because the complete door is packed in a box.
So, I plan on building my own. Only I will use mortice and tenon joints. Copying my wood garage doors should be easy.
-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
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This has been discussed quite a few times. The general answer is DON'T. Too much work for too little savings, plus putzing with the springs is dangerous.

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Hum. $4k-$6k per door for $1k worth of material somehow doesn't seem like insignificant savings, especially when I have to make four. I am simply making the door sections, putting them up is an entirely other subject, whether I make them or not.
OK, so it's been discussed...has anyone here actually tried to MAKE a garage door?
Regards,
Austin

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Austin Franklin wrote...

What kind of wood are you planning to use? I just spent over $600 on the wood alone (160bf - just barely enough) for a new entry door for my house. Includes two 14" sidelites, though.
Jim
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Hi Jim,

like
Well, the frame is basically hemfir or something like that...and the inside covering is an exterior grade thin plywood. The outside covering is yet to be determined, but the trim boards are cedar. We are thinking of using mahogany for the bottom frame piece.
What was the material for your entry door? I assume it was all solid wood, and was clear?
Regards,
Austin
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Austin Franklin wrote...

Yes, it is Sapele. First time I've worked with it. I was planning on mahogany, but would have had to order it sight unseen, and I hate to to that. My favorite local supplier had this stuff on hand, and I decided to give it a try.
It's harder and heavier and generally darker than both American (genuine) and African mahogany, which is not necessarily a good thing for a door. It has a similar-appearing grain, but like African mahogany, often has interlocked grain that makes planing without tearout difficult. Good thing we're going for a distressed look. (G) Whoever thought of that was a genius.
Interesting, a lot of fine entry doors are made of mahogany or Spanish cedar. This stuff looks sort of like mahogany and smells sort of like cedar.
Cheers!
Jim
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Leon wrote:

If it's a standard door, like a 7x9, go buy a good one and install it yourself. We got a Clopay, fully insulated and covered for under $350. I couldn't argue with the price. And it wasn't hard to install.
If it's a special size you may want to make your own. I made my own 9 1/2 x 12 foot bi-fold doors. Works for me.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
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You're an asshole afraid of springs. I have an 16'0' x 8'6" door and have loosened the spring several times and re-tightened it. Nobody ever told me they were dangerous. I guess around those that don't know how they work they are lie a bomb.
Here is what you need to do when you build your doors.
Make each section in an assembly line type production. Cut all styles, rails and panels at one time. I plan on putting my panels behind a 3/8" beading. I'll first cut this side of the rail and then cut the other side with the 1/2" x 1/2" rabbit with a tapper somewhat. Then I'll hand cut the style's tenons that were made on my TS so they fit the rails. Then assembly os saw horses where the entire door is assembled.
See if you can get a door installer to install your door with the remaining hardware needed. If not, install the door rails an equal distance from the opening by using the door as a guide. Make sure it is perfect up and down. You can leave the rails unattached at the ceiling until you get the door installed. Put the end pieces on the lower corners of the bottom section and put the rollers in. Build the door with sections by adding rollers and sections. Install the spring assembly above the door with the springs in. Now attach the end of the ceiling rails so they are perpendicular to the wall and parallel with each other.
Now to wind the spring. Draw a chalk line across the spring. Using two long bars, wind the spring so it has the same number of white strips on it as the height of your door. Lock the spring tight and it should be about right. Also you'll have to have the door weighed be a door installer , wherever you get the spring.

-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
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Woody pecks out, one last time (my filters slipped):

So the other guy is an asshole because you're too stupid to know danger when it stares at you.
Goombye aperture.
Charlie Self "I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be." Thomas Jefferson
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On 17-Nov-2003, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Joe "Woody" Woodpecker) wrote:

What a lovely thought.
Meanwhile, I'd say that if you're building your own door, why not do it the way they did things way-back-when and skip the springs and just counterweight the door? Rope, pulleys and a few steel/iron plates.
Mike
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Joe "Woody" Woodpecker) wrote in message

One can only wonder why it would be necessary to loosen & re-tighten springs on the same door several times.
Doordoc
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Well, I've never done it, but if you are talking about making a sectional door it's just a series of frame and panel sections. Sort of like long narrow cabinet doors laid on their sides. The hardware to join the section is pretty much standard and readily available.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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