Machining Delrin with woodworking tools?

HI gang.. I find myself in a situation where Delrin would be a much better material for a couple of components than wood. I've never tried working it before, so I figured I'd ping you folks...
I'll be turning and drilling (I'm making a hub). I've worked UHMW plastics before, and lots of wood. Wondering if anyone has any experience with delrin?
thanks --JD
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says...

Delrin machines fine with most any end mill, bit have no idea how it would work with a router bit or a lathe. I'd suspect that you'd be ok as long as you make sure the tool is sharp, and watch your cutter speed and feed rate.
BTW, great stuff that Delrin...
--
Regards,

Rick

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I've heard of Delrin being used to fabricate gears. What are you doing with it? In what form are you obtaining it? sheets? Where do you get it? Thanks,
Myx
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I'm making hubs to mount a drum to a rotating shaft - part of something called a plankton wheel. I'm getting the Delrin from McMaster-Carr in a 3" thick X 9" diameter disk. Pretty much all I have to do is machine in somw screw holes to mount the drum, a hole for the shaft (1"), and a hole to pin the hub toi the shaft. Should be pretty simple, but doing it in stainless will cost be about $1,000, and it will be exposed to seawater, so Delrin it is (ata cost of about $40 and a couple hours shop time...)
--JD

material
before, so

plastics
with it?

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You might also want to machine in a keyway to prevent spinning on the shaft - unless you want it to spin on the shaft <vbg!!!>
John
On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 13:11:17 -0500, "j.duprie"

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... in that case it would be an axle...
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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I've decided against a keytway because I don't think the delrin will hold up. Instead there will be a through bolt (Much larger distribution of load) --JD

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Thanks evryone. Sounds like I shouldn't have any problems. The application is for a plankton wheel - basically a big drum that you strap 2 litre bottles to. Each bottle contains smaples of plankton/larvae. You turn the drum to keep the critters from settling to the bottom. very low turbulence, but no settling.... --JD

with
doing
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Marine Biology . . . specimen sampling, I would guess.
I know they use Delrin as the sheaves in line blocks . . . more for Sail then Power . . . so you should be safe. The material is similar to what is used to make 'Nylabone' synthetic dog bones. You shouldn't have much trouble using normal wood-working tools. I know I have used the 'leftovers' from our two Malamutes for 'stops', 'bumpers', etc.
When / if turning take note that the material isn't as 'stiff' as a metal . . . especially when 'friction heat' takes effect. It will tend to 'bend away' from the cutting tool. 1}go VERY slow, 2}keep it VERY cool {keep flooded with 'cutting lube'}, 3} stop FREQUENTLY and measure . . . 'sneak up' on the final dimension.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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Jd, Delrin is thermosetting. Just try to keep it cool by using sharp cutters. You can "weld" it with a soldering iron. Large cross sections are thermo fused and thus have a seam. This seam can lead to failure depending upon application. You can tell if you have a seam if you see a faint line after machining. Delrin is a trade name. It comes in black or natural(white). Great stuff. It has teflon in it so don't try using glue. Been there. Good Luck.
On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 10:21:22 -0500, "j.duprie"

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I just finished turning and cutting some white delrin rod for my father-in- law's boat trailer. I have and use a metal lathe and was going to turn it on that, but I was in a rush so I turned it on my ww lathe.
It turns fine, just like really wet green wood. It does catch so you need to be mindful of it. I used a gouge and scraped and sanded it, with no problems. You might want to research its properties to UV light. From what I read it breaks down from direct sunlight.
Aloha, Russell

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Well, I did it. I needed to turn 2 8" disks out of delrin, so I chucked the stuff into my wood lathe, and had at it. Here's what I found: scrapers work great if you can keep them from chattering (requires a solid grip). It throws off long stringy shavings that really stink (smells like formalin).
the finish you can get is very good - nice smooth shiny surface.
sharp toiols and a moderate cutting speed are essential - turn to fast or witha dull tool and you get either catches or chatter and dust..
I managed to turn 2 parts - 8" disks 1" thick, with a shoulder at about 1" out from the center, and a 1" hole bored through the center. Kind of like a lathe faceplate but without threads in the center hole.
If you can stand the smell, its easy to turn...
--JD
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