Lubricating a vise.

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I just picked up a morgan 200a quick release vise. This is bigger than my 3 other vises, and is quick release which none of my other vises are.
I took this beast apart and cleaned up all the gunk, and resins.
I was thinking of melting candle wax to use as lube, but am curious what others are using for lube on their half nuts. This is not a half nut, more like a 1/8 nut, it only turns one rotation. Quite interesting. I will mount on another bench to see if I like it.
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tiredofspam wrote:

For my vise parts and most moving things that are exposed to dust, I use a spray I make up by dissolving paraffin shavings in mineral spirits. I also use this on my saw table. The mineral spirits evaporates leaving an invisible film of paraffin wax.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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On 7/11/2011 4:30 PM, Gerald Ross wrote:

Do you find the dissolved paraffin does a better job that using a good grade of car wax on you saw?
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2011 19:27:03 -0400, k-nuttle

What about the old Johnson's amber paste wax????
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2011 19:47:15 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Johnson's Wax is great stuff. Hmm, I wonder how my NuFinish car polymer would work on my saw, though. Sounds promising: http://www.primeautomotive.com/msds/nu_finish_wax_msds.pdf Ceramic microspheres sound interesting, oui?
-- Win first, Fight later.
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k-nuttle wrote:

Never tried car wax. I have used Johnson's paste wax. I have this stuff in a pressure spray can (from Harbor Fright) and it is very convenient. If the surface is stained I spray then scrub with a green pad, wipe off with a paper towel then re-spray lightly. I like it because it is cheap, easy to use and I can make it myself. And it is a snap to apply to a vise screw or lathe tailstock screw. It doesn't collect dust like oil or grease.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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wrote:

Boe-lube or Boe-Sheild from Boeing is perhaps the BEST - but "best" doesn't come cheap.
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On Jul 11, 8:07pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Ditto on the Boeshield T-9. http://boeshield.com/features-benefits /
R
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On 7/13/11 1:12 AM, RicodJour wrote:

Boeshield is a no-brainer. You can use it for everything. Saw tops and anything else. There is absolutely zero dust or grit collection.
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-MIKE-

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Thanks, that seems to be the ticket for the screw and guide bars. For the half nut, I am going to put on a thicker coat of melted wax under the nut, and on the nut. The nut moves back and forth a little. I don't want the bronze nut to wear out if avoidable.
On 7/11/2011 4:30 PM, Gerald Ross wrote:

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Thanks, that seems to be the ticket for the screw and guide bars. For the half nut, I am going to put on a thicker coat of melted wax under the nut, and on the nut. The nut moves back and forth a little. I don't want the bronze nut to wear out if avoidable.
On 7/11/2011 4:30 PM, Gerald Ross wrote:

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I realize this is an old thread but you mentioned that you dissolved paraffin shavings in mineral spirits. Could you give me the ratio, for say a pint of mineral spirits? How much paraffin shavings would I add to a pint of mineral spirits? A cup? Two cups? Do you heat it any to make the paraffin dissolve?
I would assume an old cheese grater would suffice for shredding the paraffin. Yes?
This intrigues me because I've heard many times over the years that's all Boeshield, Top Cote, Top Saver really is - highly overpriced paraffin & mineral spirits. However, no one I've talked to has ever mixed their own so the ratio has remained a mystery.
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I doubt that Boeshield is that.
I just took a bunch of candle wax shaved off with a knife and put it in a jar. Then took a bit of mineral spirits (MS) and let it melt it. It takes a while. No ratio, I did it by feel.
I think butchers wax isn't that far off from this mixture. Or Johnsons paste wax... As someone had mentioned. And I agree. But it was nice making my own.
Do not heat it. It's flamable with the MS. It does make a nice lube. And I might actually try less MS next time to use it for runners on draws.
Gerald Ross was the one describing the mixture that he used. Which I then just tried to make more viscous than his.
For my tablesaw top and other cast iron tops I just use Butchers wax. Every 3 to six months depending on wear.
On 4/7/2012 1:52 PM, Spalted Walt wrote:

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Spalted Walt wrote:

Actually I just dumped a handful into a pint bottle about 3/4 full of mineral spirits. I made the shavings with a little freebie--otherwise useless--hand plane. About twice a day I would shake the bottle. When no more wax was visible I added some more. When no more would dissolve I poured some in a Harbor Freight sprayer.. It looks like a rattle can with a screw-off top and a tire type valve on the side of the top. Put a little pressure in it and Bob's your uncle.
I use it on table saw top, vise screws, lathe ways, etc.
By the way, I have another recipe. Dissolve grease lube in lighter fluid and pour it back in the can. It works on bicycle chains, hinges, etc. I call it penetrating grease. The naptha evaporates leaving a grease film. If you don't make it too viscous, it will suck right into the cracks of a hinge and lasts much longer than oil.
--
G.W. Ross

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Thanks for replying. I picked up a 16oz cube of Gulf Wax for $2.99 Thursday at a grocery store and will give this a try!
Amazon has the exact same thing but it's more expensive. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
I searched on Harbor Freight's website for the spray can you described but no joy. Does the one you bought there have a model number on it?
Does it look anything like this? (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On Sun, 08 Apr 2012 12:24:08 +0000, Spalted Walt

The one I bought at HF was more like this: http://tinyurl.com/6r9yurm I'll sell it for $10 + shipping from Oregon 97526.
I think I tried it once for latex paint (too thick), cleaned it out, and it has been sitting since. NOS in box, made in Taiwan, with nozzle, cap, and instructions. It's a painted aluminum cylinder with machined aluminum top. HF #01102, which is no longer made.
-- Live Simply. Speak Kindly. Care Deeply. Love Generously. -- anon
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My experience is a pound a gallon for waterproofing canvas, so a pint would be 2 ounces of wax. This is a thin solution for brushing on. You can obviously make it thinner or thicker. I made up a gallon of the stuff using Coleman fuel, aka white gas, (VERY flammable petrol, Jeff). A less volatile solvent would be a lot safer.
Johnson's Wax uses toluene and/or xylene for a solvent and I've been known to add a little back in if I forget and leave the lid off overnight...or for a week. Toluene, MS, naphtha, turps, etc have low enough volatility that I would consider using them outside with a double boiler. Otherwise, just let it dissolve over 24-48 hours.

Yes, the finer the better if you can keep it dispersed. It tend to clump up again as it starts to dissolve. Plan on it taking overnight, and just give it a shake every time you walk by. Pretend you're making up a fresh solution of shellac.

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On 4/7/2012 1:52 PM, Spalted Walt wrote:

I have dissolved wax in Lacquer thinner and painted it on my tool tops when my old shop used to get waterlogged. It is NOT the same as Top Cote, doesn't last as long, is no where near as slick, and plainly speaking, wax sucks. I spray all my tops with topcote or equivalent for over 35 years, it's the way to go. Also, I spray a coat on all my vices, screw clamps, C Clamps, pipe/bar clamps, paint spinner and about anything I can think of that would benefit from a long lasting dry lube. Save your wax for sealing end grain when drying raw wood. I buff it off my table tops but not on the other stuff mentioned.
--
Jack
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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in

On the threads of my vises and the 3/4" or so round bars they slide on, I used some Lubriplate grease that originally came with our ultracentrifuges and was "leftover"
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Lubriplate? That brings back old memories. Isn't that a fairly thick, white lithium grease in a tub? We used it at Security Chevrolet in 1973 for hinges and door locks. When I wrenched later at a Ford dealership, we had a spray lithium grease that was just wonderful. I still buy it at AutoZone. It sprays in as a liquid, then hardens and stays in place.
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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