Looking for a moulding

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I want to restore the front door on my new house, which at some point had its external mouldings ripped off and plywood slapped on top. However I can't find anywhere that sells the bolection moulding with the right dimensions. Judging from the paint markings on the door, the moulding needs to cover about 1 inch of the recessed panel, the depth of which is about 2/3". Does anyone know a UK source which might sell such a moulding? Or will it probably be necessary to build up something from two or more mouldings?
Here's a diagram, to be viewed in a monospaced font, showing depth A (2/3") and coverage distance B (1"), with the rough profile of the required moulding marked with x's:
xxx xxxxxxx ========|xxxxxxx ^|xxxxxxxxx A|xxxxxxxxxxxxx v|xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx ========================--- < B >
Thanks in advance for any advice.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On 5 Dec 2006 02:50:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sorry but that doesn't do it for me .Any chance of posting a pic somewhere . I know of a place near Glasgow but that might not be practical for you .
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Stuart wrote:

Here's a hopefully clearer image:
http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/9930/bolectionmouldingdimensaz2.png
Obviously, the outer profile of the moulding is just roughed in - it's an illustration of the dimensions that matter for fitting the moulding on the door. Glasgow would be doable. I dont suppose they have a website showing available mouldings? :-)
Re: the other suggestion of getting some custom made - neighbours doors could be used as a template, but I'm concerned that it might be a bit expensive to go down that route.
An alternative would be to form the moulding from two pieces (see red line on diagram). Might be easier to do and give more flexibility in choosing profiles to combine.
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On 5 Dec 2006 05:21:47 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v487/molley/Moulding/IMG_6226.jpg
It's 37mm x 20mm with a bit that overhangs ( the red part) that is 5mm wide . The bit below the red part is about 12mm deep The company is Express Timber Products of Abercorn Street,Paisley .Tel 0141 848 0102 . I don't think they have a website . As I said in an e-mail if you want a sample of this particular moulding posted to you let me know . cheers Stuart .
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Stuart wrote:

Thanks Stuart, but in this case the rebate depth (12mm) would be too shallow for it to be suitable by itself. Perhaps it could be packed out underneath to raise it to the full 2/3 inch or so. I did already find a bolection/raised panel moulding at 'Build Center' but the dimensions were not right.
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On 5 Dec 2006 10:09:58 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A suitable thickess piece of timber would do the job I'm sure . How many mm do you mean by 2/3rd inch ?
S
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Stuart wrote:

That was the closest imperial measurement to the mm measurement that I made. Since it's Victorian the original moulding would have been in inches. After perusing the internets it looks like it might be 11/16" as that is a measurement which crops up in moulding dimensions. Alternatively it could be 3/4" and I've not measured it accurately! It's looking like an off-the-shelf solution is probably not available, but building up from more than one piece is more 'interesting' anyway, so no worries. The moulding I found at Build Center (sic) has a rebate of 12mm depth. Get 4mm stripwood... buy router table... increase rebate depth... put nice edge on stripwood... This option has the benefit of making me buy a router table.
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On 6 Dec 2006 02:52:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

LOL...Just because the original was made in Imperial doesn't mean you have to measure it now in that .LOL
Building the moulding from more than one piece might well be more interesting when you only have one door to do but luckily the moulding I have fitted my doors and I had 9 door sides to do ,each with 4 panels ( 16 mitres to each door).
I reckon you should use a "near enough" moulding like the one I suggested and slip a thin piece of wood beneath to give you the correct depth of the recessed part. No point in giving yourself unnecessary work or causing you additional expense.
Stuart
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Stuart wrote:

(I though that was brilliant bit of ASCII-art actually!)
Why does the moulding have to be that specific profile? I've restored several doors in the past which have been "Barrybucknellised" like yours in the past; I've just used whatever moulding I could obtain and that looked good.
David
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Lobster wrote:

Thanks :)

There's no exact profile I'm after - whatever looks good, but I would like a projecting moulding that extends out a bit onto the door stiles/rails (called a bolection moulding I believe). Just because that's what was there before and it looks a bit more solid than an inset moulding, IMO.
I might end up applying an inset moulding that's flush with the door stile/rail, and then cap the join with another moulding. Achieves the same ultimate effect, but with a bit more hassle.
It's interesting to see how the detailing in my new house varies according to how visible it is to 'the public', so cornicing is fanciest in the sitting room - where the door has bolection mouldings, and elsewhere the cornicing gets less ornate, and doors get inset mouldings. Victorians were clearly a bunch of cheapskates interested in spending as little as possible to project an image of wealth. :)
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Victorians were clearly a bunch of cheapskates interested in

Well what's changed?
cheers Jacob
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normanwisdom wrote:

Nowadays we're just cheapskates, I guess.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

OK, I've certainly seen that stuff (projection moulding?) around, but can't recall exactly where... I'd have guessed at simply somewhere like B&Q or Wickes, but presumably you've tried them?
Have you looked at the Richard Burbridge range? Might be worth a phone call: <http://www.richardburbidge.co.uk/main.asp?page 3>
David
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Lobster wrote:

All the major merchants do their own range of mouldings. Travis Perkins etc. Depends who's in your area
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Lobster wrote:

Either they didnt stock any such moulding, or they did, but with the wrong dimensions, IIRC.

Thanks, I'll try that - it would be useful if they had an online brochure of their range.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Many thanks to everyone who took the time to reply. It seems that the possible answers are:
1) Keep looking at retailers for a moulding with the right dimensions 2) Build something up from 2+ pieces, maybe with some modifications. 3) Get a joiner to run up a custom-made batch of moulding 4) "Dado Rail"
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yes, but timber merchants rather than sheds or BMs. You're more likely to find it in a posh area where big front doors are the norm

For exterior, probably not a good idea. The smaller the section, the quicker it rots

Very expensive for one door, and you're not trying to match anything exactly.

Doesn't matter what the moulding is called. Sounds like depth is the key dimension for you, so just look for something close.
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On 2006-12-05 10:50:41 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com said:

The best solution for this would be to take a sample or a dimensioned drawing to a joinery firm and ask them to run the section for you on a spindle moulder.
For a short run like this, tooling could be made for 20-30 to work with a universal cutter block
Look at
http://www.wealdentool.com/acatalog/Spindle_Tooling_91.html
as an example. A joinery firm should have the blocks already and will be able to have knives made quite easily from a sample of the profile or the drawing.
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Try Thames Moulding Co 16b Whytecliffe Rd South Purley Surrey CR8 2AU Tel: 020 8668 0332
Their catalogue shows 21 bolections.
Toby
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