Looking at buying a RAS

Page 1 of 2  
I'm looking at buying a used DeWalt RAS. It's definately quite old, but those DeWalts have a reputation for top quality. What should I be looking for in evaluating the saw?
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 30 Jun 2014 03:22:57 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

dangerous problem. If the blade stalls it kicks back and starts in reverse- - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It's capacity, compared to what you want to cut with it (that may sound stupid, but I'm not kidding). Look at the cord too, to see it that's an extra project (not kidding about that either). Check that it's not missing any of it's parts too. I'm not sure how to tell you to check the bearings (Mike Marlow probably knows). Try it out. If it does what you want, then it will probably continue to do what you want for at least a while! I wish I had bought a RAS sooner.
Good luck! Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Some thoughts...
1. Does the motor turn on? Any wiggle in the arbor? Runout?
2. Is the column firm (no wiggle)?
3. If you rotate the column to an angle cut, does it lock there firmly? Does it return accurately to zero (lay down a square against the fencewith a marked tooth touching it...when you return column to zero, tooth and square should be as thet were, Try rotating in the other direction too.)
4. Does the saw cradle rotate easily for a bevel cut? Lock firmly? Return to zero accurately? Ditto all rotating for a rip.
5. Does the saw carriage move to and fro easlly? Can you wiggle saw side to side (not good).
6. Fence clamps functional?
7. Table in decent shape? Cord too? Blade cover? Pawls and splitter intact?
Basically, you want to be able to use the various means of setting the saw differently relative to your work, have it stay as set and be able to return things to where they were.
If you buy it and spring for a new blade,get one intended for RAS; i.e., with low hook...too much hook and the blade will want to climb up on what you are cutting as you pull the saw. Even with a RAS blade, keep a somewhat stiff arm as you pull.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, June 30, 2014 6:05:01 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

marked tooth touching it...when you return column to zero, tooth and square should be as thet were, Try rotating in the other direction too.)

w differently relative to your work, have it stay as set and be able to ret urn things to where they were.
*8. Can it clearly catch your favorite FM station? And will it properly re turn to that station, if the tuner is moved?
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Something to thing about. Is it going to be your primary tool for cutting?
If not, do you have the room to dedicate to it?
I started with a RAS and built quite a bit of furniture with it. We still use a dresser that I built. 3 years later I added a Craftsman 1 hp TS and "never" used the RAS again. 3-4 years later I got rid of the RAS and have never missed it. 17 years later I upgraded the TS to a cabinet saw. When I did that my CMS saw the same as the old RAS. I still have the CMS but have not used it in the shop since 1999.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is it powered by a 2-stroke model airplane engine (most of them ran equally as well forwards or backwards).
--
Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! UH-OH!! We're out
at of AUTOMOBILE PARTS and
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 29, 2014 10:22:57 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

Related question. I bought an old Dewalt RAS for 40 bucks from a guy becau se he appeared to need the money. It does not have a blade or table, and I' m not sure how much work needs to be put into it. My question: If I give it away, am I liable in any way in case it is dangerous? Am I better off sett ing it by the curb for the trash guys, and even there, should I render it u nusable?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/30/2014 08:32 AM, Michael wrote:

The table is no big deal either. If it had one, it should probably be replaced anyway. Not difficult to fabricate and install unless there is some missing table mounting hardware.
If there are no other issues, I would keep it and tune it up and use it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, June 30, 2014 11:29:32 AM UTC-5, Doug Winterburn wrote:

d I'm not sure how much work needs to be put into it. My question: If I giv e it away, am I liable in any way in case it is dangerous? Am I better off setting it by the curb for the trash guys, and even there, should I render it unusable?

I could, but I don't need it and I don't have the room. I already have a De walt compound miter saw mounted to accommodate long pieces for those kinds of cuts, and I use the table saw and a circular saw and guide for wider boa rds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 Jun 2014 15:10:24 +0000 (UTC), Grant Edwards

so reversing the start winding reverses the motor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I have a 230V RAS, and I almost never ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever ever use it. Ok, it makes a fair to crappy extra table to store stuff on. If I took the saw and arm off of it then it would make a better table. So I guess I always use it. As a flat surface to store stuff on.
I use my contractor table saw almost everyday when I am in the shop, and usually a couple times a week even if I am working mostly in the field. A larger blade larger table cabinet saw would be handy when working a lot with it, but the contractor saw stores out of the way easier when not using it, and allows for quickly moving it out of the way even if its not used for just a little while.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 Jun 2014 09:29:32 -0700, Doug Winterburn

parts. Whatever the recipient makes out of those parts is totally HIS responsibility - not yours. As given, it is not dangerous unless he drops it on his foot- - - .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 Jun 2014 13:14:57 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

the new pilot crashes it, and they come back on the builder - even if he was 2 or 3 owners back. They seldom win, but the often try!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

much useless as a cabinet-maker's table saw.. Mabee not useless, but definitely not optimal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, June 30, 2014 12:59:13 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Of course, I check my cuts with a square. The saw has jogged out of tune a couple of times and I've adjusted it. It's been a while since I've had to d o that. I'm not kidding when I say that the 45 degree cuts are picture-fram e ready. It amazes me. I need to buy a fine blade for it, though. The cuts with the framing blade are a little rough. Maybe I could sell the old RAS a nd pay for it that way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually I check every cut with a tape and a square/angle when its important. Even when its not and I don't its better than the stupid RAS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SFWIW, Cerritos college has a single 12" RAS compared to 10-12 SawStop table saws in their Wood Manufacturing Technology lab.
It's use is limited strictly to cross cutting rough stock to rough length as the first step in preparing rough stock.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 Jun 2014 11:42:39 -0700 (PDT), Michael

throw it around like most contractors do if it has held it's tune that well. The cheapassed sheetmetal based "contractor saws" I generally see can't be trusted for anything finer than framing. (and I mean HOUSE framing - not PICTURE framing!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heck, the way most houses are framed they don't anything better than a rock hatchet squared off on the back side. I've been a licensed contractor (communication) for over 20 yeas, and in the industry longer. I've seen maybe half a dozen houses TOTAL that were framed or even layed out square.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.