long deck screws

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On 15 Apr 2009 19:57:04 GMT, Puckdropper

...those aren't too bad, but they still cam out if they get worn at all...I like the "shankless" variety preferred by drywallers and, when I can find 'em, I'll stock-up. You won't find 'em at HD, I usually get mine at my local tool supplier speciality shops. That said, I use square drive more and more...

...whomever is responsible for that tool sits on the pedestal with the wheel-guy!
cg

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I figure they're cheap enough to replace when they start to get worn. After all, why sell 25 packs if you don't expect people to replace them. (Unlike garden hose washers, which are sold in 10 packs so you have to buy 10 every time you need one.)
I'll have to remember to ask about "shankless" bits next time I'm at the local industrial supply store. (They carry some woodworking tools too. :-))

And the power steering guy!

Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

The problem with using dry wall screws with wood working is that they tend to break off more than a wood screw will. Dry wall screws are designed for soft wood and dry wall, they are very brittle with little actual strength. their biggest strength is that their heads are less likely to strip out than the plastic packaged screws found at the Borg.
Keep in mind that shankless screws cause problems if you using them for wood working. Screws with threads through out the length of the screw tend to prevent two pieces of wood from being drawn together. Typically you have to put the screw in, remove it and then reinsert it to get the joint to close.
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On Thu, 16 Apr 2009 07:49:07 -0500, "Leon"

...ach! Stupid me, I mean "reduced" shank bits! Sorry for my lingo lameness...but I'm definitely referring to the "bit" and not by any means the screws. But, now that you mention it, yes, drywall screws *do* break off...they're on the brittle side. I'll still use 'em, though usually as a third step: glue-bradnail-screw with pilot. They may be subject to failure in a twist situation, but on the pull side they are pretty dang strong...
cg

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Charlie Groh wrote:

"Reduced shank"? Seems to me there's a Viagra joke in there somewhere...
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I haven't had much trouble with the drywall/wood screws I usually get from the big box stores. Of course, my primary working materials are pine (Jummywood) and plywood, and I almost always predrill.
I /do/ have all sorts of problems with a fine thread drywall screws. The only reason I use them is because I haven't remembered to get 1 1/4" coarse thread screws.
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

And soft wood is what they were designed to work with. You should continue to have good results with soft woods.

I bit the bullet many years ago after breaking too many dry wall screws. I discovered dry wall screws about 25- 30 years ago, a few years later I discovered the square drive hardened screws and that was that. IIRC I bought a small assortment just because of the square drive advantages, I had no idea that the screws were actually less likely to break. Today I probably keep 2-3 thousand square drive screws on hand in 30 or so sizes and styles. Because of their unique design I use more pocket hole screws in other than pocket hole applications more and more now that they come in a wide range of lengths.
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On 2009-04-16, Puckdropper <puckdropper> wrote:

A little info from my mechanic days. A GOOD hand/hammer impact driver has indestructable bits, some better than others. I discovered Japanese bits too soft and would twist after a few blows, but the Korean brands were bullet proof. They also had blunted tips for full flute engagement. I'm gonna find my old Korean driver and give that tip a try. I never ran across a USA made driver, that style fastener (oval head phillips) not real popular for engine assy in US. Maybe the one's Snap-On carries are US made. I've not kept up with who makes what tools anymore, so many US tool companies having gone under. :(
nb
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On 2009-04-15, Puckdropper <puckdropper> wrote:

I did use the dewalt tip, provided with the gun. I still think it a bit too pointy. I have a few other phillips tips that are stubbed at the tip to ensure full flute engagement.

Being a mechanic/machinist, when I think of an impact driver, I think of those heavy steel, hammer driven, whack-that-sucker! drivers used to get stripped phillips head screws outta Japanese cycles/cars or huge bosch electric impact hammers for breaking up construction stuff. I think this gun might have an impact function.
I'm from the old 16 box school of framing and am a babe in the woods with this cordless carpentry tool stuff. Had no clue till I watched a pro putting up an addition next door and noticed he never once swung a hammer, that I could see. That was an eye-opener.
I'll learn. ;)
nb
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OK I know what you are talking about here, manual hammer driven. Since you are a mechanic you will understand, in the woodworking world the impact driver is more like and works like an Impact Wrench except they are battery operated and use 1/4" hex bits.

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Try a Bosch "Impactor" and you'll never go back to using a drill as a screw gun. ;-) http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/BoschProductDetail.aspx?pid=PS40-2A

A hammer is still pretty good at coaxing boards into place. ;-)

It's fun. "More power!" ;-)
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