long deck screws

I recently had to repair a neighbor's fence after running into it on an ice
covered downhill. It's a rustic 2 rail lodgepole fence and she had plenty
of material, so I didn't have to buy material, which was nice. Anyway, I
couldn't get 6" spikes, which were originally used, so I used 8" deck
screws.
My question is, how does one use an 8" deck screw? I had to drill a hole in
the rail so the 8" deck screw would run all the way into the fence post.
If I didn't, the screw would stall with about 2-3 inches remaining. My
DeWalt screw gun lacked no power or torque, it's just that the phillips head
screw would start stripping out. If I can't drive an 8" screw with a good
gun, how do I use 8" deck screws?
nb
Reply to
notbob
Bigger gun, softer material.
Gotta' have enough torque to be able to drive them completely in first go or you're done (as you learned). Most decking is done w/ new pressure treated lumber which is so soft and wet it's possible.
Anything much harder will almost certainly require pilot hole.
--
Reply to
dpb
A phillips head on a 8" screw is an exercise in futility. You either are going to have to drill bigger pilot holes or go to lag screws. With lag screws you have that big, beefy hex head to drive with a wrench of some kind.
Reply to
Lee Michaels
Predrill the hole or use a 12 volt Impact Driver. Impact Drivers tend to have 3 to 4 times more torque than most drills, including corded ones and they tend to not strip out the screw heads. I typically will use my impact driver to remove a Philips screw with a stripped out head.
Reply to
Leon
You should also lubricate the screws with wax, soap, anything to make them a bit slippery. It does help. Honest. mahalo, jo4hn
Reply to
jo4hn
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 08:37:40 -0700, jo4hn wrote:
...gas and wax, baby! Hex-head would help a ton, square drive too...
cg
Reply to
Charlie Groh
1. hole (screws always need holes)
2. wax on threads
3. brace with a properly sized screw driving bit.
All the torque you want, depending on your arms :)
Reply to
dadiOH
As has been mentioned, with a deck screw, you get one shot to get it home.
Pilot hole required for all except possibly the softest woods. (Why take a chance?)
Square drive or hex head screws preferred.
Have fun.
Lew
Reply to
Lew Hodgett
notbob wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@bb.nothome.com:
I've found that having a good Phillips bit helps tremendously. The bit should seat completely in the screw head and not move. I've seen several "#2" phillips bits that were really more like a #1 1/2. My favorite are DeWalt bits.
As mentioned above, an impact driver will help tremendously too.
Puckdropper
Reply to
Puckdropper
"dadiOH" wrote
I knew a guy who did that with lag screws. It was amazing. He had to apply a fair amount of muscle, particularly on the longer ones. He then applied a wrench to finish it and drive the lag screw flush.
Reply to
Lee Michaels
Another thing is most deck screws are square hole and are higher grade. Those with Phillips - they are Phillips-II as I recall and have much better grip and leverage. Phillips bits don't fit near the same.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
...those aren't too bad, but they still cam out if they get worn at all...I like the "shankless" variety preferred by drywallers and, when I can find 'em, I'll stock-up. You won't find 'em at HD, I usually get mine at my local tool supplier speciality shops. That said, I use square drive more and more...
...whomever is responsible for that tool sits on the pedestal with the wheel-guy!
cg
Reply to
Charlie Groh
Charlie Groh wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I figure they're cheap enough to replace when they start to get worn. After all, why sell 25 packs if you don't expect people to replace them. (Unlike garden hose washers, which are sold in 10 packs so you have to buy 10 every time you need one.)
I'll have to remember to ask about "shankless" bits next time I'm at the local industrial supply store. (They carry some woodworking tools too. :-))
And the power steering guy!
Puckdropper
Reply to
Puckdropper
The problem with using dry wall screws with wood working is that they tend to break off more than a wood screw will. Dry wall screws are designed for soft wood and dry wall, they are very brittle with little actual strength. their biggest strength is that their heads are less likely to strip out than the plastic packaged screws found at the Borg.
Keep in mind that shankless screws cause problems if you using them for wood working. Screws with threads through out the length of the screw tend to prevent two pieces of wood from being drawn together. Typically you have to put the screw in, remove it and then reinsert it to get the joint to close.
Reply to
Leon
...ach! Stupid me, I mean "reduced" shank bits! Sorry for my lingo lameness...but I'm definitely referring to the "bit" and not by any means the screws. But, now that you mention it, yes, drywall screws *do* break off...they're on the brittle side. I'll still use 'em, though usually as a third step: glue-bradnail-screw with pilot. They may be subject to failure in a twist situation, but on the pull side they are pretty dang strong...
cg
Reply to
Charlie Groh
...might as well use a big 'ol fat nail! LOL...nothin' like a bit of pounding to test your structure...
cg
Reply to
Charlie Groh
Square head recessed or Star Drive (Torx) are far better than Phillips. IMO, the OP should be using a Star Drive screw in this situation, though it's still going to need a pilot hole. I only use Phillips (pan head) for wall anchors and other light duty. Lag screws are useful if the screw will be under a *lot* of shear stress and the larger shank is needed.
Reply to
krw

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