Log too big for my shop tools ?!?!

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I don't think my 10" TS or my 14" BS (with riser) would be able to handle this piece of wood :)
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category 69&itemu23674395&rd=1
Wow!
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http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category 69&itemu23674395&rd=1
I wonder where the rest of it is. A lot of toothpicks there, eh?
- Owen -
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What's funny is that the buy it now price is $1,500,000. What will be even funnier is when some idiot pays that for it.
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wrote in message

handle
Pray tell...what is the value of a log this size and age?
todd
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Todd Fatheree wrote:

Depends on how many people you can find collecting 16' long chunks of log, I guess, but nowhere is it apt to be a million and a half bucks. The photos are abominations, so it's impossible to tell rmuch about the log, but if he gets an offer over 100 grand, I'll be surprised. In fact, if he gets an offer, I'll be at least slightly surprised.
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wrote in message

even
Well, he already has several offers, the highest of which currently stands at $65,100. The Buy It Now price of $1.5 mil is pretty much meaningless. The real question is, what is the reserve price? My point is that I don't think that anyone here knows the true value of a 40,000 lb hunk of sequoia.
todd
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I agree. I don't think the bd-ft value has anything to do with it. Carve a masterpiece of a wizard for some Hollywood-type and you'll get your money. That piece of wood needs a publicist.
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wrote:

sequoia.
I worked the total board feet to be roughly 10,000. Admittedly, I don't know the board-feet value of sequoia lumber, but I doubt the purchase could be justified on that basis. Moreso on the fact that this is, AFAIK, a one-of-a-kind item.
todd
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Particularly if it was cut in Oklahoma where it is being sold! :o)

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I'm calling CitiBank to see if one of my cards has a $1.5MM limit on it. Would hate to make an offer only to have my card max'd out.
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wrote:

If you had that much money to spend on a hunk o' wood, I'd imagine you could just have your butler find someone to cut it to a more suitable size for you. :)
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That's a lot of coffee tables.
ORrrrr.....
An architect with vision together with a team of engineers could create a masterpiece. A million- five, isn't what it used to be. For instance, if Madonna wanted to have it made into a bidet, it'd get sold.
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Or Bill Gates was in the market for a new paper weight...
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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He lists the size as:
21-0 long
21-7 cir. at top
23-2 cir at bottom
So, somebody check my math here. I'm assuming a useable length of 20', and a useable minimum diameter of 6', and I come up with 565 cubic feet of log. At 12 bf per cu. ft., that's 6700 board feet (allowing for waste and kerf).
This sucker is pushing $10/bf already!
Kevin
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Well, if someone was going to buy it for any of those prices, it would make sense just to spend the money on ready to use stock. The only way it might be worth something is if some project was made using the whole log as a single unit. Totem pole maybe or something else equally exotic.
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using the 21'7" circumference, I get a diameter of 6.870189 ft. or a radius of 3.435094 ft. PI*r**2 gives 37.459896 sq.ft cross-section. 21' length gives 786.657816 cu. ft. or 9339.893792 bd ft. before any wastage.
Which puts the 'raw' price at bit under under $7/bd ft.
Allowing for the bigger base circumference. one gets over 9800 'raw' bd ft.
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The value doesn't scale linearly with dimension; the bigger plank you can get, the more it is worth.
When I was a kid in Oregon, they were still logging first growth, douglas fir and cedars. I used to carry a baritone horn to school while trucks went by carrying one log, a piece about 20' long. Those went to a lumber mill, where planks were cut off. After the core got small (I don't remember how small) the remaining part was sent to a veneer mill where a lathe removed layers for plywood. The final "peeler core" was about 6 inches in diameter. Depending on the mill, those could be sold for firewood or cut up into broomsticks, etc. They finally burned the bark, chips and sawdust to generate steam. It was said they used everything but the smoke. And actually, electrostatic precipitators in the stack collected particulates, which were pressed into charcoal briquets, although it didn't pay to ship those far.
Steve
"and a useable minimum diameter of 6', "
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My neighbor told me a similar story about 1 log per truck in the old days.
There was an article in The Oregonian a couple weeks back about an upstart company in St. Helens, OR, doing Willamette and Columbia River underwater timber salvage similar to the operations in the Great Lakes and other places. The owner of the company has his eye on a beast of a log that he just doesn't have the massive equipment, as yet, to raise - the log is on the order of 12' in diameter.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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One of our local hospitals has a wall of historical photos from the community. A few of those photos are of log trucks (and even mule-drawn wagons) pulling huge logs. To the best of my recollection and guestimation, the logs are 6-10 feet diameter. Except these aren't redwoods or virgin fir, they're bayou cypress. From above the swell.
Man, couldn't I make a fishing cabin with one of those!
Kevin
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[...]

This one log part per truck reminds me of the joke of the two farmers bragging about the size of their farms where the first farmer says: "My farm is so large that I need 3 days to drive around it in my car!", to which the other replies" "Oh yes, I once also had a car like that..."
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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