Loctite for wood screws?

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The hinges on my kitchen cabinets screw into the inside edge of the maple frame. Each hinge is only screwed to the frame with one screw. The hinges are similar to these: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Every once in a while I need to tighten up the screws as they work loose. So I was thinking of putting something on the screws to keep them from loosening up. Anybody ever try something that works? I was thinking a little silicone in the screw hole would hold them and still be removeable.
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Silicone is a reasonably good lubricant, so I wouldn't expect it to hold the screws tighter. I believe I'd first try screws that are longer, thicker, or both.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

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Doug Miller wrote:

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Doug Miller wrote:

Sorry about the earlier blank posts.
For whatever reason the screws are not 'standard' wood screws. They have a very harsh thread pattern more like particle board or MDF screws. They are also only about 5/8 long. Longer screws are probably the best idea plus it will give me an excuse to order something from McFeeley's.
BTW by silicone I meant silicone caulk. If it holds well enough to make a car jack necessary to remove a sink I figured it should hold a screw.
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I do not know what kind of screws or how much threads are going into the maple wood. You may have a long shoulder without threads not leaving enough thread contact with the wood. The quick fix is to remove the screw wet it with water and apply a little drop of Gorilla Glue. Then screw it back in to place and wait overnight before using the door or doors. The right way is to remove the screws and doors and insert a wooden dowel impregnated with epoxy glue. Wait about 24 hours. Then you have to measure the bottom of the screw thread and select a drill size to match it. I recommend that you get a screw that has thread up to its shoulder and make sure it is the right length. The pilot holes have to be bored perpendicular to the vertical structure. If you have many holes to make a drill jig would be a real asset. It will save you time and make sure that you are boring the holes perpendicular (90 degrees) to the surface. Before inserting the screws apply a little gorilla glue on it. If you are using a drill to drive the screws make sure that the toque is adjusted as not to strip the wood. It would be best to practice on a scrap piece of wood first to validate your drill bit size and driving toque.
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snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote: SNIP

Screwing into end grain? BTDT didn't like it.
Besides, the screws are not stripped they just loosen up a little. I suppose they will eventually strip out if I don't fix them properly but by then SWMBO will want a new kitchen,... or house.
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You do what you like its your problem. AFAIC I have used this procedure (with two part epoxy) for a long time without any problem.
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I've had better luck using bamboo skewers instead of dowels.

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I like the idea of using bamboo skewers.
I'll give it a try.
Do you think the skewers should be dip in two parts epoxy or urethane glue before using?
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Likewise, I've had good luck over the decades using toothpicks. I know - it's a travesty in this group, but I've done it on exterior door hinges, small scale work, and all sorts of things and I've never had a problem. Works for me.
--

-Mike-
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That's what I've always used . . . .

How could it be a travesty?
WOOD toothpicks WORKed into the hole with some
WOOD glue WORKed in there too to keep them in place seems right in a
WOODWORKING newsgroup . . . .
--
"Ladies and gentlemen take my advice.
Pull down your pants and slide on the ice."
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Beats me, but I've seen where it has upset folks. Seems the preferred method is the dowel method, but I always defer to the good old toothpick.
--

-Mike-
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Yup, used to be wooden matches (without the head of course). Prolly b4 a lot of you were born...

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(snip)
Don't laugh... but rolling up little bits of aluminum foil works really well too....
at least.... so I've heard .....
:)
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Whatever fills the gap. Foil probably conforms better than some things.
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Whatever fills the gap. Foil probably conforms better than some things
On board my sailboat I carry a two parts epoxy putty stick. When I am in trouble I fill the screw hole with that epoxy putty. Then I wait 15 minutes. Make sure it has harden and drill the proper size of pilot hole. I have use that epoxy putty (gray) to fill holes in my wooden dinghy and it works well.

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snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:
> Whatever fills the gap. Foil probably conforms better than some things > > On board my sailboat I carry a two parts epoxy putty stick. When I am in > trouble I fill the screw hole with that epoxy putty. > Then I wait 15 minutes. Make sure it has harden and drill the proper size > of pilot hole. > I have use that epoxy putty (gray) to fill holes in my wooden dinghy and it > works well.
Similar to the above, the following is a sure fire way to repair stripped screw holes.
1) Drill out stripped hole with a 1/4"-5/16" drill. 2) Fill with an epoxy putty which is nothing more than epoxy thickened with micro-balloons. 3) When cured, drill pilot hole which is about 75% of thread OD.
SFWIW, IMHO, wood screws are worthless except when you are building a wooden boat.
Coarse thread, self tapping sheet metal screws provide much greater holding power, especially in thickened epoxy as described above.
Yes, you can remove the screws, if required.
Have fun.
Lew
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RayV wrote:

Silicone is a royal PITA. On some surfaces it sticks like nothing else. e.g. electrical grade silicone used to secure the circuit board to the neck of a TV or monitor tube typically cannot be removed from the glass neck even with a razor blade. You can get the bulk of it off but the last traces just will not come loose. OTOH we have all experienced peeling silicone in the bathroom or kitchen, and its extremely difficult to get a new bead to stick well.
My war stories with it all involve boats, and after many fastenings backing out, sealing fillets peeling etc. I vowed *NEVER* to use it again if there was any alternative. It only sticks properly to perfectly clean surfaces and when it cures it contaminates any surface that it doesnt stick to and in fact when its cured a fresh application wont even stick to it. When it has failed to bond, it definately acts as a lubricant and helps screws back out.
Many years ago, a professional boat-builder taught me to never put a screw in dry. (Boats are a bit different to cabinet work as there is always movement and changing humidity to contend with) He favoured dipping the screws in varnish. I've had no trouble with screws working loose unless they were seriously overloaded but have seen many screws that were put in dry work loose.
If you are overloading the wood and the fibres are getting crushed, wood hardener on the screws might help if varnish isn't enough but if you have a real problem and cant go to longer screws, West Systems have a lot of helpfull info at
<http://www.westsystem.com/webpages/userinfo/manual/#bondingfastenersandhardware
The same technique can be used with most other brands of Epoxy but you *MUST* follow the specific brand's mixing instructions, not the WEST ones.
If you ever want to get the screws out, they should be clean and shiny (no rusty or chewed up ones) and you need to scrape a trace of candle wax onto them then flow it evenly over the whole thread by applying enough heat to melt the wax before inserting them into the hole with the wet emoxy. Easy enough to do one at a time with a lighter flame or you can wax a batch of screws in the bottom of a tin with a small lump of wax and a hot air gun or other heat source. Waxing the screws apparently weakens the fastening by about 10%. Even if you dont wax them they can be got out by heating the head of the screw for about half a minute with a 100W soldering gun immediately before trying to unscrew them.
--
Ian Malcolm. London, ENGLAND. (NEWSGROUP REPLY PREFERRED)
ianm[at]the[dash]malcolms[dot]freeserve[dot]co[dot]uk
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RayV wrote:
> Every once in a while I need to tighten up the screws as they work > loose. So I was thinking of putting something on the screws to keep > them from loosening up. Anybody ever try something that works?
Epoxy.
After that, it's all downhill.
Lew
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