lightweight chainsaw for yard work & Mother's Day

My wife has asked for a small chainsaw for Mother's Day (my kinda woman). She doesn't want a heavy gas-powered saw, just somthing convenient for cutting branches and small tree limbs in the yard. What would be ideal, if anyone makes such a thing, is one that's convertible between a regular saw a pole saw for high branches. Failing that, recommendations in either category appreciated. Corded is fine, cordless would be even better (again, if anyone makes one).
Thanks,
Andy Barss
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I bought 2 Poulans at Lowes last year, the 14" Electric and then the Pole saw version for a different project. They are corded. Both are excellent machines. The 14" is still less than $50 and the pole version is under $100.
Yes the pole saw can be removed from the pole. Had I bought it first, I would not have bought the second saw.
It depends on what you want to cut. A recip saw with a 12" pruning blade will make short work of most stuff 2" and under. Recip saws are much safer than chain saws for the new user, the blades are replaceable, hitting the dirt does dull them nearly as quickly. I always use this tool when cutting where I might hit embedded metal or for roots.
18V cordless recip saws are strong enough to cut for a bit before needing a charge. It may weigh a couple of more pounds than the chain saw but you don't have to add oil or remember to oil the chain.
Colbyt
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Hitting dirt also chews up the edge of the bar, making it difficult to cut straight. Not too difficult to repair with a file, but an annoyance at least.

You can get a corded model from Sears that's adequate for homeowner use. Avoid the rechargeable saw, replacement batteries cost more than the tool.
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On 4/30/2010 3:23 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

I have a 14" Poulan electric chain saw. I have had it for over 15 years. After hurricane Fran the neighbors laughed as I got my electric out and started on the down trees. At that time I cut up over 30 trees that had came down in the hurricane. a couple slightly over 28" in diameter.
If you have a relative small yard, one that can be covered with 100' of cord, and never need to take it into the field the electric is the way to go. While all of those people with the fancy gas saws are putting oil in the gas and trying to get the dumb thing started. You have laid out the cord, cut up what what you want and have every thing put away.
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Andy:
I have a 16 in. Remington ( they also make a 14 in.) electric that I have used for several years. Cut small branches and cut up two 10-12 in caliper trees that the wind took down. Have used it to top off several 4x4 fence posts. Works like a charm! My" Lady Friend" has used it a lot and it's not too heavy. Lowe's as well as others carry them as well as parts.
Sparky
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On Fri, 30 Apr 2010 16:32:21 -0500, the infamous "sparky01"

I picked up the Remington 14" electric at least 15 years ago, and it's still going strong. Someone tell Barss to pick up one of the folding pruning saws from Harbor Freight for his wife, too. They're pullsaws with Japanese style teeth. Really wonderful saws for light work. I've cut down 8" diameter 22' pine trees with one...when properly motivated. (530' from an outlet, no gas chainsaw)
-- Losing faith in humanity, one person at a time.
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A good Scandinavian bow saw cuts amazingly well, with little effort. It's light and has no cord or fuel tank (except the arm that holds it). I've had a 21 inch Sandvik for over 30 years. It hasn't had a whole lot of use, but I've never put on the spare blade that I bought with it. I also have a cheap 30 inch, probably Chinese. It doesn't cut nearly as well, and the frame flexes a lot on the pull stroke. That makes the blade flex and bend, jamming in the kerf.
Doug
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On Sun, 2 May 2010 09:55:43 -0400, the infamous "DougVL"

I bought a Sandvik 24" from Grainger when they went on sale once. I keep it in the truck for real trees which aren't within cord distance of an electric chainsaw. Works well, doesn't need sharpening the few times I use it each year.
-- Courage is the power to let go of the familiar. -- Raymond Lindquist
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Several companies make folding pruning saws. Corona has a particularly nice one.
Here's a list of the ones I have and like, from my web page about walking stick gathering and making:
Corona Professional folding pruning saw #RS7041, with a 7-1/2" sharktooth blade. [costs about $20, $11 at Walmart]
Gerber Sport Saw folding saw, with a 6-1/2" sharktooth blade.
Takagi Shark Saw folding pruning saw #10-5427, 9" sharktooth blade.
Coleman Deluxe 9" folding saw #836-811T with sharktooth blade. [camping department of big stores]
Fiskars 10" folding pruning saw #7947 with a very different type of tooth, which you can sharpen with a chainsaw file.
Oregon ProZig 10" folding pruning saw with the same type of tooth, which you can sharpen with a chainsaw file.
NOTE - those last two don't have the Japanese style tooth. They also have replacement blades. Pole pruning saws are available in this style of tooth as well. They're easier to get the cut started with and less likely to cut halfway through your finger if you slip when starting the cut. (Don't ask how I know that.) The Japanese style teeth really tear up skin and flesh! And very quickly and easily.
And since I made that list, I found 3 sizes of the japanese style tooth folding saws made by Stanley at a Big Lots store a few years ago. Haven't seen them since, though, but they're nice.
Doug

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I got my wife the Alligator ? Black and Decker ? that was advertised last year - It is great on stuff up to 4" or so. It is a two hand in handles that are double switch protected. Chain is behind plastic unless cutting. It is electric. Two or three wire cable. Double insulated...
No problem - has cut lots of green and dry wood. Oak of all types.
I used it today as she was sweeping (rake) up some chips and junk out of the lane and I was cleaning up some small stuff that didn't get it with the arbor saw or 20" husky.
Since it works in the air (more or less) - it never gets into the dirt and the blade stays sharp! Might be a tougher steel.
This is great for small homes and we have 7 acres with 5 of them with trees.
Martin
Andrew Barss wrote:

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wrote:

Got one about a couple months ago. It's great for what I need and I own two gas chainsaws. However, I will say, that you really need a second battery. The first one goes quickly if you're cutting some thick stuff.
MJ
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I would recommend a reciprocating saw - saws-all / demo / wrecker's saw - corded or battery
They have enough power to cut almost anything, and they have a wide variety of blade types and lengths available.
My Swmbo makes twig yard furniture and wanted a saw several years ago, and that's what I got her. (Canadian Tire, corded, on sale $50; 1 1/8" stroke, 8.5 amps) Easy to use. We got some B&D Piranha blades for pruning - 4.5 TPI 10" blade They work great. Easily cuts through +6" branches However this type of saw does not answer your need for a pole saw.
We recently took down a tree, using that saw to remove all the branches, before a friend came over with a chainsaw to take down the trunk. We mostly used a ladder, but there was some climbing. As an added bonus, if there is anything that needs cutting with out significant precision this is the saw for it. I needed to cut some rusty bolts of a my boat trailer - this saw, plugged into an inverter did it in under 30 seconds.

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On Fri, 30 Apr 2010 19:23:16 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

Hi Andy,
I have both petrol and electric chain saws.
I find either type works well cutting anything up to the blade length.
I mostly use the electric saw, since it is quick to set up and there are no starting problems/stale fuel issues.
In a home setting I doubt you would ever wear out an electric chain saw. One of mine is over 20 years old and still works well. It has cut quite a bit of wood over that time.
Ross
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On Fri, 30 Apr 2010 19:23:16 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

Corded- Remington 10" convertible $99 free shipping (Amazon.com product link shortened)72713898&sr=8-1
I got one from Harbor Freight a few years ago. Handy little gadget.
Jim
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On 4/30/2010 2:23 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

A sawzall will work as well if not better than a small chain saw for small branches and trees. I've taken down 6" diameter trees with a big corded sawzall. and removed a stump that was over 10" around.
Caution not hedge trimming, a chainsaw or sawzall would be extremely dangerous if used in that fashion.
Buy this combo, give her the sawzall and keep the drill. I have the combo. The sawzall works as well as can be expected for a cordless, the drill is the best cordless I have ever used.
Milwaukee M18 Hammer Drill/ Sawzall Combo Model # 2694-22
http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware-Power-Tools-Combo-Kits/Milwaukee/h_d1/N-5yc1vZar5vZzvZ1xg1/R-202043827/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
LdB
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-snip-

Not in my experience. A sawzall blade goes back and forth and shakes hell out of a small branch without getting anything cut. a chainsaw pulls the branch toward the saw- locks it against a stop and cuts it off.
When I tried some trimming with my sawsall I got lots of shaking & pinching- not much cutting.
Now-- lopping stuff up on a sawbuck or two-- I might grab my sawzall if it is handy.
Jim
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