Licensed electrician ?

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When someone says "licensed electrician", as in "you have to be a licensed electrician to get this permit to add the 240V outlets to your shop", what exactly do they mean?
I know in most states (for example, Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan), a state agency issues a license after successfully passing an exam. This makes perfect sense.
But in Illinois, the state does NOT issue electrician's licenses. It issues licenses to doctors, lawyers, realtors, hair dressers, etc., but not electricians.
Yet many local Chicagoland building inspectors insist on license electricians. What license are they referring to?
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Driver's License? Fishing License? Gun License?
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In Pennsylvania and California, A 'Licensed Electrician' was one who owned an electrical business and passed a test to obtain the license. Others could work for them however the responsibility that the work was completed satisfactorily falls upon the owner of the business. No permits can be obtained without the license. (Except by the home owner). In Pa. this only held true only for the larger cities with payrolled inspectors. Outlying areas did not require licensing and used NBFU inspectors or a private recognized inspection company, They also issue the permits. Wash. Ore. Idaho and Utah require that all work be done by or under direct supervision of a working licensed individual. (The same license is valid in all those states.)
Chipper Wood
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I used to live in Utah, and now reside in Washington State. One could do his own wiring as long as it was not commercial, so a license was not required. That may be different in Utah now, but I still have an open permit for our home here in Washington, and no license is necessary. You do have to work to code, however. In Washington, the State oversees electrical, whereas in Utah it was left to the counties. Could be different there now, I've been gone for over 8 years.
Harold
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.>I used to live in Utah, and now reside in Washington State. One could do

In Florida "owner builders" can get permits for their residence, not rentals, if they don't sell it for a year or for a business if they own the building and the total project is something like $25,000 or less. I currently have an owner/builder permit in my yard for a pool and the associated deck, electrical and stem wall. It really was pretty painless. The only rule was that any people I "hired" had to be licensed but anyone who worked for free was OK. If I did hire an unlicensed person I had to buy insurance for them, pay FICA etc. In another law there is a $500 per employee, per year, exemption for "casual labor" but you still own their ass if they get hurt. I hired a few guys to move dirt but I got them from a licensed labor pool. It was still cheaper than getting a machine
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I'm damned jealous of you folks who are allowed to do your own wiring. I'm doing a major reno of my house and I need to use a licensed elec outfit for ALL of the work. My quotes have ranged from 15 to 45k. Granted, I need new service and that shouldn't be performed by a homeowner. But for the branch circuits I am very capable, just not allowed in Chicago. Hell, we can't use anything but conduit in the walls. No Romex, no armored cable (bx), only pipe. :-( Strong building codes are a good thing, but this is just to keep the electricians working OT. Just MHO. Mark L.
Harold & Susan Vordos wrote:

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wrote:

Conduit in the walls!!!!!! Holy Crap, Batman! My house was built 63 years ago with BX in the walls. Chicago ought to get with the times. Let's get 'em to move up to the 1940's.
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Yup, we in Chicago have to run pipe in walls, even if they will be drywalled. Like I said, mainly to keep the unions happy. Most homeowners don't want to learn how to bend pipe. Although, I do admit pipe makes it very easy to upgrade/make wiring changes down the road. I just think the code should be written to allow homeowners the choice.
Lazarus Long wrote:

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Rules change from county-to-county and city-to-city but what you just described is an electrical contractor, which is different from an electrician. In my county, they license electricians (like me), master electricians, and electrical contractors. Each have a separate exam (among other requirements) and differing privileges.
Vaughn
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This also is the way it is in chicago . My boss passed the test and we work for him.Some years back the union was pushing for testing and license for the electricans but did not make it Mark H.
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"Licensed electrician" can mean several things but for the purposes of pulling permits (in Fliorida) this means the person is a licensed electrical contractor, they have met experience requirements and have passed the tests, have insurance and they carry at least $75,000 in performance bond. That also includes all the other local occupational licenses, unemployment etc.
There are also places that have journeymen licenses for the people who work for the contractor which mirrors the union structure in places with a "right to work" law and they can't compel people to be unionized.
The reality is a lot of "licensed contractors" are just figureheads who may not even live in the state with real bozos working under their license and a good lawyer to fend off the unpleased customers.
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An _electricians_license_, oddly enough. <grin>
Issued by the municipality, not the state.
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AL writes:

State laws may provide an exemption for you to work on your own home as long as you follow code and permitting procedures. In a commercial or public structure, you may be outta luck.
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You are correct that the state does not register or license electricians in Illinois. Electrical tests for licenses and registration is handled by municipality. Most cities have their own electrical inspectors or departments that administers the electricians exam and grant licenses. Most other cities or municipalities recognize the license and only require a small fee and insurance to work there. The exception is Chicago, where you must pass a separate exam to do any electrical work, including low voltage.

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Chicago, L A, New York City and others are considered high fire hazard zones. That's the reason for the ridged rules and wiring methods. If you make a mistake in your country home, You might also burn down your garage... In crowded cities lots of lives and real-estate are at risk. The IBEW has an acceptable apprentice program. Hmmm. I guess that's better than just reading a book.
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Chipper Wood

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Since most fires are caused on the user side of the receptacles by extension cords and space heaters I don't see how pipe in the wall is making you safer. By making renovation so much more expensive, by banning fished cable, they are actually encouraging an extension cord instead of just installing another circuit.
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In Illinois each city has its own licencing exam but except for Chicago, most recognize eaach others. Here is a link to an application for a Chicago electrician's license: http://egov.cityofchicago.org/webportal/COCWebPortal/COC_EDITORIAL/Electrician_1.pdf
AL wrote:

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Glenn Ashmore

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In Florida, licensing is at the state level.
http://www.state.fl.us/dbpr/pro/elboard/elec_index.shtml
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Idaho too, allows a homeowner to do his own electrical. Did my own shop with 240's and 120's, saved a bunch of money. The city or county electrical inspector is the one to talk to in your area.
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These days you might find everything you need on the internet site for your local government. When I pulled my permits I got all the instructions, checklists and application forms online. It made things real easy when I got downtown because I had all my ducks in a row before I went in.
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