leveling feet

I recently made a couple of benches where one of them had a slight rock. I leveled the feet, but it still rocks, depending where it is resting on the floor.
Is it really necessary to get all feet perfectly level on the ground when most of the time the floor it is resting on is not 'perfectly' flat ?
What do you 'usually' do to level feet? TS, sand, handsaw...?
--
www.garagewoodworks.com



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A rocking bench or tool would drive me nuts. Wedges and shims are your friend.
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NO NO NO... the correct response for someone worried about such matters is to flatten and level the floor and if that isn't possible because the foundation is out of whack fix that too. ;~)
John
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GarageWoodworks wrote:

In theory, you just rotate the piece: http://www.arxiv.org/abs/math/0511490v1
--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But, in
practice, there is." ~ Jan L. A. van de Snepscheut
  Click to see the full signature.
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Which says D(t) = |(t, 0, g(t, 0)) - (-t,0,g(-t,0))|**2 = 4t**2 + (g(t,0) - g(-t,0))**2
(smacks forehead) Duh! Of course! No wonder my table wobbled!
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GarageWoodworks wrote: | I recently made a couple of benches where one of them had a slight | rock. I leveled the feet, but it still rocks, depending where it | is resting on the floor. | | Is it really necessary to get all feet perfectly level on the | ground when most of the time the floor it is resting on is not | 'perfectly' flat ? | | What do you 'usually' do to level feet? TS, sand, handsaw...?
At <http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/RAS_Table.html (about the middle of the page) are photos of some levelers that I made for the "wings" on my RAS table. They're inexpensive, sturdy, and easy to make.
HTH
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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It's hard for a regular bench, but 3 wheeled or footed stands do not rock regardless of where you have them or how uneven the floor is. Level is not necessary for most equipment.
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My current project, designed by the client, is a 9' long, stand alone, piece of bedroom furniture. It has 3 pairs of inset doors (1/16" reveals) along the front with a top drawer behind each pair with shelves below. It will have a 1 1/4" carrera marble top. It is being built using solid hardwood (lyptus actually) so will be very heavy. All this is supported by 8- 3" square legs that are a prominent feature of the design. It will reside in an upstairs carpeted bedroom. In the past I have used appliance feet threaded into tee-nuts to support akward pices such as this, but in this case, the legs are prominent, and with the carpet, I feel I need more bearing surface area at each point. Structurally, because of the tight inset doors and the heavy, brittle top, it is imperative the case work remains flat and square. The only solution I can think of is to use shims on site at delivery, before installation of the marble top. My fingers are crossed. I
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for workshop benches, where strong trumps pretty I use 4x4 legs. bore a hole up the middle of the foot and thread in a long and thick lag bolt- 3/4" diameter by 10" long makes a pretty good workbench foot. if you're worried about scratching the floor cut a pad of carpet to go under it.
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S/S, Large Tee-Nuts secured with screws and carriage bolts, typically 1/2-13 work for me.
Lew .
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On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 22:19:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I sort of did that... but didn't like the relatively small bolt head as opposed to the 2x6" bench legs..
As I "age to perfection" as my wife says, I prefer a little higher bench, so I cut squares from a tuba4 and recessed the bolt heads into that.. the "feet" need very little turning to adjust them and just seem to give a more solid footing..
(I tried the carpet scraps under the bolt heads but on ceramic tile floors you end up chasing the damn bench around the room when you're sawing something)
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Not only not necessary, virtually impossible except by random chance.
A "perfect" plane is established by three points, and the fourth just eliminates that perfection.
when

A shim glued on if it is to be permanently mounted in one spot.
Frank
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Try the nylon feet with a threaded rod. Drill a hole in the bench feet, tap in a T-nut, then screw in the feet. The only kind of rock I want is on the radio. ;-)
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