LED lights under insulation

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In the new shop I am having built I want to use flush mount LED lights in the ceiling.
Some folks say I need a can over them because the insulation will be blown in. I don't know why since the LED lights don't produce much heat.
Am I missing something or just plain wrong?
Thanks
Jim
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On 5/8/2016 7:22 AM, swalker wrote:

I would say at a minimum the cans should be used for esthetics if nothing else. The cans will prevent the insulation from falling down into the opening. It will also keep the insulations away from the connection making it easier to repair or replace the ligth fixture in the future.
I think the first question you should be asking is what is the building code in your area. Cans may be required for the installation of all types of lights.
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On 5/8/2016 7:22 AM, swalker wrote:

Some lights, whether they be incandescent, fluorescent, or LED, are rated for insulation contact (IC) and others are not. It will be clearly marked on the fixture and the box. All of the dedicated LED flush lights I've looked at have been rated IC but that doesn't mean that they all are. By all means do it by code otherwise you might find your investment going up in flames with no recourse to insurance coverage.
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On 5/8/2016 6:22 AM, swalker wrote:

LED lights themselves do not produce heat. Their transformers however do produce some heat, whether that be at an alternate location or built into the light element it self.
The instructions that come with the LED lighting will indicate what is necessary.
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Leon wrote:

My high output flashlight gets rather hot after a while. Maybe the lithium batteries? Or an in-line resistor.?
--
GW Ross

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High Power LEDs produce a LOT of heat at its junction on the mcpcb (metal core printed circuit board) which is transferred through the pill, in this cut-away:
http://i.imgur.com/rr4HruK.png

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPzb_w8PrLY

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Energy is being consumed so some heat is generated somewhere but I have never witnessed the actual Light Emitting Diode to ever even be warm.
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On 5/8/16 10:24 PM, Leon wrote:

Bigger ones (500 Lumens or more) produce enough heat to burn skin, It's painful 8^(
-BR

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At high output, they sure will. Probably not fire hot but they'll get hot enough to cook many insulators, which may avalanche into a real problem. Use the fixtures as designed.
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LEDs themselves do produce heat, altho not very much. As it happens, transformers also produce heat, altho not very much. The two things that do produce enough heat to watch for are the rectifier circuit (usually but not always in with the transformer) and the current limiting resistor (usually but not always in with the LED). Typically the biggest heat source is the resistor.
John
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I will say that the ribbon LEDs that I have used produce no noticeable amount of heat at the LED itself. We in fact never turn our under cabinet ribbon LEDs off and there is no heat build up at all.
Given that, a roll of ribbon LEDs on the reel will heat up pretty quickly but once unwound and laid out flat there is no noticeable amount of heat, ever.
In fact our LED strings of Christmas lights that I also leave plunged in all season 24/7 never get warm either.
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Don't stick your finger on the LED. The LEDs themselves get quite hot.

Yup. RTFM.
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Actually I have held my finger on countless LEDs, ribbon LEDs, and have never felt anything.

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Don't assume they're all the same. Again, use them AS DESIGNED and you won't have problems.

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On Sunday, May 8, 2016 at 9:09:09 PM UTC-7, Leon wrote:

Your finger is a good heatsink, but a poor sensor. The LEDs produce more heat than light, and there are other components (resistors, one per three LEDs, typically on strip lights) that dissipate power, too.
One watt of light is about what a 2 inch magnifier collects on a sunny day; that would get your finger very toasty, even if there weren't ANY waste heat.
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On 5/10/2016 12:43 AM, whit3rd wrote:

My point is that if my finger can't feel any heat from the LED ribbon or LED it is not going to be hot enough to burn the wood it is attached to.
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Leon I have burned myself on LEDs, granted I was repairing a problem but they do get warm it is a function of how much current is flowing. But the transformer is the main heat sources and what ever resistive element is use to create current.
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I have never felt any heat from an LED. And that is touching them directly.
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On 5/8/16 8:38 AM, Leon wrote:

LED lights produce a lot of heat. The problem is the LED itself is very sensitive to heat and this heat from the LED is essentially a point source. Much work with heat sink design goes into removing this heat.
-BR

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Exactly. If they're not used as designed in fixtures that they're designed to work in, that heat may not be able to escape.
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