Learning to use new jointer

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Been lurking for a while. I have gotten lots of good information from the group, but need to ask a question now.
I got a Grizzly G0500 jointer a couple of months ago and finally got the gar^H^H^Hshop wired for 220V so I could use it. Jointing a face on 4/4 8"wide red oak has not gone as well as I would have hoped. The little yellow push blocks that came with the jointer don't seem to work very well, or I am doing something wrong.
I have the infeed table set 1/32nd lower than the outfeed, but am still having problems feeding the stock thru without hesitation. Am I pushing down too hard or what?
Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
Dave in Northern Colorado
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Dave wrote:

Have you waxed the tables? It makes quite a difference. The first time I waxed my table saw it was like I'd removed sandpaper from the table surface.
-- Mark
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 03:30:25 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

Mark,
I did put a little beeswax on the table right after cleaning all the gook off it. I am waiting for the weather to improve, and then I was planning on cleaning it really well and applying a thin coat of shellac. I had read Tom Watson's post on that and it sounded like a very good way to prevent rust and provide a slickery surface.
Thanks for the info.
Dave
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Shouldn't need much if any downward push, especially on the infeed side. Those cheap push-blocks are only meant to give you forward movement. You can put a little more pressure on the outfeed table but don't over do that either. If the tables are aligned properly (get the owner's manual out for that one) and the knives are sharp (new machine so should be ok), then let the machine do the work.

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Tom,
I followed the destructions that came with the jointer for aligning the tables, and on shorter pieces it seems to work ok. The problems I am having is when I try to face an 8 or 9 foot piece of red oak. From some of the other posts, I think I have "seen the light"
Thanks for the info!
Dave On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 03:39:15 GMT, "Tom Kohlman"

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Dave wrote:

Does the project you have planned require 8' to 9' long stock? I cut the stock to slightly longer than required before surfacing. It makes things much easier.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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wrote:

Jack,
The current project does not, but the next one will require some 6' to 7' lengths. I agree, when the stock is shorter, the jointing is much easier.
On the brighter side, I have gotten some in/outfeed stands, and with the input I have gotten from everyone, I think the next round will go much better.
Thanks for the info.
Dave
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Good luck Dave
Keeping the thing tuned and sharp knives are important (wait until you have to replace the latter...OUCH!!!) LOL But I can say that I did a big project over the summer on my Delta 6" where I "abused" it so the $50 for new knives after two years of relatively regular moderate use was expected.

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I would make sure that you have really cleaned up the bed & fence first. If you have not already done it use a solvent like WD 40 or mineral spirits to really clean all cast surfaces. After everything is clean put a few coats of wax on.
If you have already done the above then I would check to make sure that the depth of cut is really 1/32". The other thing to check is that your knives are all set at the same height. A lose belt can also effect the cut. I have a tape that does a great job of showing how to tune-up a jointer. I would gladly loan it to you if you like.
Bob McBreen - Yarrow Point, WA
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wrote:

Bob,
One of the first things I did was get out the WD40 and get all the gook off. After having done it, I was worried that maybe I should have used something different, like some kind of orange oil cleanser or something. Glad to hear the WD40 is an approved cleaner. <g>
Some of the other responses have led me to what I believe is my problem, namely poor form in feeding the stock.
Thanks for the info, and the offer of the tape. Unfortunately, since we got the new dvd player, I can't remember how to hook up the VCR! Need to get one of my kids over to show me how again!
Dave
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Like someone said, you don't have to push down; you have to push across. You should have push blocks that grab the back end of the piece. http://shopping.capelinks.com/amazon/asinsearch_B0000223V6.html
I am not recommending this particular pushblock or the company; I just wanted an illustration of what you should be using.
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I would only use that type of push stick for a TS. Once there is enough of the board on the outfeed table that is where you provided the locomotion. JG
Toller wrote:

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JGS,
I have one of those push sticks and thought about using it, but on an 8 to 9 foot piece, my arms aren't long enough!
Thanks, Dave
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Where in Northern CO? I'm in Loveland
Dave wrote:

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Hi Clarke,
Just east of you a bit on 34. In Greeley.
Dave
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I made the mistake of pushing down into the blade when I got my jointer. Made a lot of scrap that way. I have a standard set of pushblocks myself. Feed the stock into the blade with light pressure from the infeed side and firmer pressure from the outfeed side, making sure not to put pressure on the stock directly over the turning blades. you are sure to have uneven pressure at some point of the stock when over the blade causing an uneven cutting pattern. Make sure that you are keeping the stock directly against the fence. Also, make sure that the outfeed table is at the exact height of the cutting blade at the apex. Make sure to balance both blades so that they rest exactly level to the outfeed table. This makes a huge difference. Hope this helps.
John V ( Still very much a newbie)

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John,
I was doing exactly that, and like you say, it makes for a lot of scrap! I was also standing way to the right of the outfeed table and shoving the board into the blade.
Thanks for the tips!
Dave On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:07:43 GMT, "JohnV"

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...

...
Hi Dave,
I'm probably right down the road from you. Be glad to spend a couple of minutes with you if it would help. I use a Sunhill jointer, but all the 6" jointers are pretty similar.
As other posters noted, don't push down too hard on the infeed side. You're just trying to whack off the high spots on each pass through the jointer. It really doesn't take too much downward pressure at all. If you have a bowed board, do it concave side down. If you have a twisted board, be careful not to rock it as you are doing the pass.
Cheers, Nate Perkins Fort Collins, CO
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On 13 Jan 2004 06:06:57 -0800, n snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Nate Perkins) wrote:

Hi Nate,
I am in Greeley. Whereabouts in Fort Collins? About the only place I go to over there is the Sears Trostle store over by old towne. Are there any other places around to find good wood?
How are you liking our January weather?
Dave
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(Nate Perkins)

...

Hi Dave,
I'm in southeast Ft Collins, behind the new hospital. Give me a call if you want to come by and test out jointers (I'm in the book).
Yeah, January is sometimes a bit cold out in shop (which is located in the third bay of my garage). I recently got a ceiling-mounted IR heater that is a big help. Lately I'm just building small stuff (boxes with marquetry and the like, and trying to get practiced at hand-cut mitered dovetails). SWMBO is talking about getting me to build a dining room buffet for her, though (wahoo!). I am ready to make real piles of sawdust again.
Sears Trostel has a woodworking class that they have run the last couple of months that covers techniques with several power tools, including the jointer.
Cheers, Nate Perkins
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