Lathe mobile base

Hi everyone I have ordered a Jet 1446 wood lathe with the cast iron legs. Does anyone know what the foot print size is? so that I can get a mobile base that fits. I would like one that has a three point base sense my shop floor is not all that level.
Thanks.... Lee
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Lee - get on over to the woodturning newsgroup,
rec.crafts.woodturning
This is a pretty popular lathe so I'll be someone would run out to the shop and measure. Just a comment, I am almost positive that they made a three point base for the 1236, but none after that. Once again, almost positive but not quite, I think they stopped making them because they rocked on the point of the odd leg.
I am thinking that you should looking into the Jet mobile bases that adjust in two directions and plan on using two sets for your lathe. Make sure you get bases heavy enough to stand the weight if you bag it down with sand or whatever you might use to add more weight.
Robert
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I assume you mean Jet 1442....20x57. I just measured.
Regards,
Steve
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C & S wrote:

Hay thanks allot Steve I owe you one.
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Why not buy the Jet mobile base?
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Lee,
You've had some replies so far that recommend you go to a Jet mobile base. I'm not familar with the Jet, but I too am looking to put a lathe on wheels and I plan to take a different approach. I have a Rockwell 46-111 lathe (14[11] x 48) that I will build a stand for and add the ability to move it around. Because I plan to add bags of sand, wheeels are a must. I alos only plan to move the lathe for cleaning or outboard turning, however my shop is small thus the need for all castors to swivel.
I really don't like the locking castors. I guess I just have cheap ones but they never seem to lock tight enough for me. With that in mind, here is what I plan. I will use 4 swivel castors with rubber wheels. I plan to set the lathe height on wheels about 1 inch lower than working height. This really is dictated by how level the floor is. I will then use 4 leveling feet (one near each wheel) to raise the lathe off the casters. I have the levelers already (along with the casters, a result of dumpster diving) but you could make them from 1/2" carriage bolts. In your case, I would think you could attach a 2x4 across each pair of legs and attach the castors and levelers.
Good luck,
Bill Leonhardt
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Bill Leonhardt wrote:

Hay Bill Makes sense to me.. I have allot of ideas in mind also. Jet does not make a mobile base to fit this lathe other than a universal base. with that one you would have one of the rails right where your feet would be while working. i have seen a few that have a single bar that runs down the middle, thats what im looking for. Guess i will have to make one myself.
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. i have seen a few that have a

My Jet mobile base is like that.
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SNIP

rubber wheels. I plan to set the lathe height >on wheels about 1 inch lower than working height. This >really is dictated by how level the floor

Hi Bill. I have seen that design in execution and it is great. The design I saw was a like this |-----| with wheels on the outriggers. The legs were drilled through on the feet and a large bolt adjusting foot like these
http://tinyurl.com/2zxk9g
Were installed. I am not sure, but I think one of my buddies got them from McMaster Carr for one one of his projects.
Check out
http://www.mcmaster.com /
and type in "adjustable feet" in the keyword box. You should go to page 1308, and you can see a variety of heavy duty leveling feet, as well as the dampening kind located at the top of the page.
I would also recommend steel wheels, as the heavy duty hard rubber wheels I put under my huge old workstation corroded after about 10 years and they fell apart when I needed to move the workstation. Just a thought.
Robert
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SNIP

Hello Robert,
Thanks for you feed-back on my approach. The picture of the leveling feet on the Grainger web page you sent are exactly like the ones I got dumpster diving (gloat), so I'm all set.
I am familiar with McMaster since I use them often for work.
I made a mistake when I said I was using rubber wheels. Actually, I have steel wheels with rubber tires.
I haven't built the lathe stand yet, but I've been looking at different approaches. I like the idea of adding lots of weight with sand bags. I think the loose sand (contained in bags) will absorb some vibration if it occurs.
I intend to build my stand just after the Christmas holidays and I'll post a picture (perhaps on ABPW) when it's done.
Bill
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Bill... If you only need to move the lathe for cleaning, etc., I'd say skip the mobile base..
I have the jet 1442VS with the cast iron legs and it's fairly heavy. I might move it around every 2 months or so, which makes a mobile base a waste of money, IMHO.. I bought a cheap set of "furniture mover" dollys from Harbor Freight, just 4 little plastic blocks with several wheels on them... I just put a set next to each pair of legs on the lathe, stick a piece of 2x4" under the stand and lever it up enough to kick the rollers in.. repeat on the other end and you can roll the lathe out of the way... reverse process to put it back and take it off the wheels..
For a reference to effort involved.. I'm 61, have a back problem and don't do anything that might make it worse..
Works for me and cost about $10.. YMWV
mac
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Mac,
Thanks for your suggestion of using the moving dollys. It makes a lot of sense.
I'm still going to go with the leveling feet and casters. I have a somewhat uneven cement floor and I really like the solid feel of using the leveling feet instead of having to shim to stop any rocking that may occur.
I have seen the "wheel corrosion problem" myself, therefore I like the thought that the wheels will seldom be in contact with the floor. It will also prevent the rubber wheel tires from getting a "set".
Bill
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Another approach is to find an old Shopsmith and use their lift system... mines been going since '81 and never had a problem with it..
Step on it once to lift a bit, once more for higher, third time to drop it... I guess you'd still need leveling legs, but they came with my Jet 1442..
mac
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