Keyless chucks

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I have a Dewalt 18 volt drill and like it very much except for one thing. Since new, the chuck slips when the drilling gets heavy even with a half inch bit. It is a PITA. Is there anything *I* can do to minimize or eliminate this? Is it possible and feasible to get into the clutch to clean or adjust it? Do all keyless chucks act this way? Hoyt W.
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Since new,

is a PITA.

and
chucks act this

Some people have a problem with slipping chucks. I have a keyless on a Panasonic and 2 DeWalts and do and have nor ever had a slipping problem. My drills however are 9.6 volt. Also I have a keyless on a DeWalt corded drill and have witnessed the slipping on the larger bits. The clutch has nothing to do with the way a chuck grips. Getting into the clutch may improve the way the clutch works but will not improve the grip of the chuck. If you are using a hi torque drill with a 1/2" bit, you may simply not be tightening the chuck enough. Many bits over 3/8" in size have the ends ground flat in 3 places so that the bit is no longer round and will better engage the jaws of the chuck. This is done to insure that the chuck does not slip on the bit. Many better bits have been manufactured this way long before key less chucks were main stream. Large bits simply have much more bite and are more prone to grab and cause slipping especially on a higher torque drill.
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I have a DW 14.4v that slips. I cleaned and lubricated the inside of the chuck which helped a bit. Lowes has a new BD chuck that I've considered putting on the drill. It costs about $30 dollars. If I decide to go that route, I'll probably see about buying a chuck from DW.

Since new,

is a PITA.

and
chucks act this

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I'm convinced they all slip when the going gets tough. They belong on smaller capacity chucks IMO, and I would never put one on a drill press for example. Unless your chuck seems sticky or sluggish when turning by hand, I would not expect cleaning it to help.
What does help is to use some inertia when tightening. For example if I want my chuck to maximum tightness, I will close the jaws to almost closed on the bit. Put the drill on the fast gear reduction, hold the chuck and let the drill slam it home. The result is much tighter than just using the low gear reduction to drive it closed. Mine is a 14.4v PC.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

Since new,

is a PITA.

and
chucks act this

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Pounds on Wood wrote:
<snip>

<snip>
Now THAT sounds like something which may help. TKX a heap.
Hoyt W.
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I have been told by several reps of portable drills that the method you describe is NOT the correct way, even though I use a similar method.
I have a Bosch 12.0 and their rep tells me that the "correct" way is to grasp the lower part and twist it while holding the upper portion of the chuck.
I use his method and the chuck still slips at times.
I use your method and the chuck still slips.
I think they all slip.
Pounds on Wood wrote:

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I use 1/2" keyless Albrecht chucks on a regular basis. They do not slip. I have used them on milling machines to drill 1 1/4" holes in steel plate. No problem. It would look a bit funny on your portable drill but if you want a good one on your drill press, there are none finer. List price: $225.00. Good ones are made just not at Home Depot prices.

thing.
It
possible
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wrote:

nope a good keyless chuck is actually stronger then a normal chuck. I have one on my drill press. it works great. it's a 5/8" chuck and has no problems.
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
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On Thu, 27 May 2004 05:14:37 GMT, Steve Knight

heh. there's a world of difference between a "good" keyless like say an Albrecht and the cheezy keyless chucks that get put on cordless drills.
Different animal entirely.
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I only have a imported 55.00 chuck on my drill press it works fine. but it takes two hands to tighten it.
--
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if the drill does not have a lock then you need both hands to tighten the chuck. if you just use the drill motor power it will not be tight enough. that's why I get a drill that locks the shaft when it is off. that way you only need one hand to tighten the chuck.
--
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I guess there must be good chucks out there. Sounds like the cost more than the whole drill kit so I probably won't own one. Keys are fine for me on stationary tools. My 14.4 PC has more torque than I can hold by hand without creating blisters on my palm after a few bit changes. (no palm blister jokes please) And the chuck is not designed with enough area for two hands. I guess you get what you pay for.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

chuck.
why I

one hand

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wrote:

my chuck on my drill press is just an imported one. it works pretty well. a cordless drill really needs a quill lock to make it easy to tighten the chuck.
--
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wrote:

Every keyless chuck I've used has this problem to a greater or lesser extent. There are two solutions, one is to get bits that have flats on them (3 or 6), the other is to replace the chuck with a keyed one. This is the reason my old corded drills still get a lot of use, even though the new cordless ones are powerful enough for just about everything I do.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Another way is to use a Snappy or equivalent. They have a hex shaft. I have a few of the various drill bits that fit it, and also an adapter that lets it use any drill bit with a 3/8" shaft (intended for Kreg bits). It's a PITA to need special drill bits though.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

Since new,

It is a PITA.

possible and

chucks act this

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if used right most keyless chucks have more torque then a keyed chuck. but you need to use both hands to tighten if there is not a spindle lock. of course cheap chucks don't help. but my metabo never slips and I can chance bits all day long. but it is cool and only requires one hand.
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On Thu, 27 May 2004 05:18:44 GMT, Steve Knight

The Jacobs keyless on my 14.4V drill has too narrow a band for me to get a hand on it and use both hands to tighten. Sure, I could grab the channel locks and reef it down, but that sort of defeats the whole "tool-less" idea. I'm sure the serious professional stuff works fine, but I'm not spending 300+ on a drill just to drop it 8' onto concrete again. I've actually gone to the cheap HF cordless drills because I don't feel so bad when I break one.
By contrast, my old Milwaukee 3/8 corded drill has suffered all sorts of falls without any evident damage other than cosmetic.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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O

that's a poorly designed chuck. but my metabo drill was only 169.00 and is as tuff as nails. and a great chuck.
--
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On Thu, 27 May 2004 11:59:57 -0500, Tim Douglass wrote

Well, you said the magic word in my opinion. Milwaukee. I own two cordless, chuckless drills, one a Porter Cable and one a Milwaukee. The PC is worthless. The chuck doesn't slip, but after daily abuse for 6 months, it developed a wobble in the chuck that will require the chuck to be replaced to fix. The Milwaukee on the other hand has a full metal chuck (unlike the metal and plastic version on the PC drill) and has taken every type of abuse I can throw at it. There is a reason in test after test by magazines and construction trade rags that Milwaukee's gear is always at the top, it's designed to last. Every time I go into the BORG and see boxes of Ryobi tools walking out the door I keep wondering how long it will be before that person is replacing it. I personally don't want disposable tools any more. I want tools that I can pass along to daughter who loves to help me build things.
Wayne
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Since new,

is a PITA.

and
chucks act this

I have 14.4 v. Makita and Craftsman, 9.8 B&D, and a couple of Craftsman corded drills with keyless chucks that I haven't found to slip. In one of the Craftsman cordeds, there is a strong tendency to resist releasing the bit when in reverse but then the chuck comes off the shaft. Irritating so I seldom use the cordeds - that along with the wires makes them a hassle. I may get a couple of good 18 volts. Anyone have a favourite?
Agkistrodon
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