Jointer technique tip/observation

I was recently edge jointing some stoc about 5-6' long for glue-up. (I find that this is approaching the capacity of my jointer with a combined bed length of 42". I wasn't paying close enough attenting to my technique and I ended up with a few convex edges. I knew that it was technique and not setup because some of the edges were perfect.
I found that it took several passes on the jointer, carefully watching technique to "fix" the convex edge.
I found it easier (fewer passes) to recover from a concave edge than a convex one.
So, to "fix" a convex edge, I made one pass on the jointer, dropping the stock onto the cutters 6 inches into the cut and lifting it off 6 inches before the end, creating a sort-of concavity. One more regular pass and everything was just right.
Is this an old trick that I just discovered?
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Stephen M wrote:

It might be.
It's often said it's easier to flatten a slightly-hollow-ground chisel back (or face) than one that's slightly convex, because a concave one won't rock on the surface of a flat sharpening stone.
- Daniel
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It's got a _loooooong_ gray beard. Any standard woodworking text will have it.
Note that you can do the same on the face, or take a two-lumper flat, too. It's the way things are done with a hand plane.

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On Thu, 4 Nov 2004 11:02:16 -0500, "Stephen M"

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