Jointer/planer honing

Has anyone used one of these blade hones for their jointer or planer that lets you hone the edge of the knife without removing it from the machine?
http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?ItemNumber=G3631&
Do they work?
SteveP.
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I've got the one pictured there. I find it's pretty much useless, but YMMV. I resharpen my blades with a belt sander, followed by DMT diamond stones.
Dave
Highland Pairos wrote:

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Seems to violate one of the principles of honing by making the scratches parallel to the edge.
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I'm wondering if they will smooth out small knicks. My new planer is leaving strips of uncut wood in line with direction of feed, i.e. perpendicular to the knives. I am assuming that there is a knick in a knife. I inspected each one twice but could not see anything. I was hoping that a few passes with one of those hones might fix it.
SteveP.

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Highland Pairos wrote:

...
If it's a big enough knick to see it in the wood, a fingernail should be able to feel it easily...if it's so small as to not be observable by eye easily, probably can help...
Some shift knives slightly left/right to get the knick(s) out of line w/ each other, thus eliminating the ridge at least temporarily...
If use for rabbeting, this doesn't work well, however.
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hoping
To take 'em out, you'll have to remove serious metal. These aren't designed to do that. What Duane said is the answer most people use for knives otherwise sharp. Unfortunately this usually means more than a few minutes to reset the height of the shifted knives. Some of the lunchbox types are supposed to be simpler.
You're going to scrape 'em anyway, aren't you?
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I'm with George. Sharpening of tools has to be 90 degrees to the cutting surface. Otherwise, you are just creating weak spots for the material to knock the edge off.
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There's a bit of debate on that one. Some books also show figure-8 in sharpening some items. For coarser grits, though, I'd agree with you.
I've used those stones on the jointer for years. It does help to keep them clean and just touch up the edge. However, as mentioned, they are not made to remove knicks in the edge.
A sizeable knick requires grinding back the edge and restoring the bevel before sharpening. GerryG
On 22 Feb 2005 17:06:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@garden.net wrote:

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No. I'll go ahead and pass on the hone. I will inspect once more, and run through all of the setup checks that they call for, but I cannot see where any of that would cause a strip of uncut material. Then I guess I will go ahead and shift the knives.
SteveP.

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Highland Pairos wrote:

Setup as in knife height, etc., isn't, as you say, going to make any difference on a ridge being left on the surface. As I noted before, if there's a ridge of sufficient size to see/feel, then there's a knick of sufficient size to find.
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