James Krenov and art furniture

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Andrew Barss wrote:
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I fear our esthetic senses are rapidly sliding towards IKEA and Pottery Barn and the range of "furniture" is getting smaller and smaller.

You'd think by now Mr. Bennett would look like Dizzy G at his fullest after so many years of tongue in cheeking. "I'm not an artist. I'm just a furniture maker." - my ass. It ain't how good you are but how good you can make people believe you are. The fact that he CAN design, build and finish really good pieces is more the pity. Too much ego and not enough soul in his stuff, to say nothing of all the really nice wood he wastes on things that could've been done out of MDF, or plaster of paris for that matter.
I'll skip googling Hosaluk. Thanks for the warning
(rant mode off)
charlie b
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He is not a big man standing approx. 5 foot 6 inches or so. It is my belief that his scale is based on that, not what the so-called average height of a North American male is supposed to be. Unless you actually SEE a piece in the flesh, so to speak, the books and magazine photos can throw you off.

his work. Not the function of a set of kitchen cabinets but the function of doing WHAT that particular piece was designed to do. Hold some pipes, a few precious ( one of his favourite words) items.

close on to 30 years ago before the Mendocino thing was even a dream in the organizers mind...12 of us had a long discussion one night over barbeque and wine at our humble place in Petaluma, California.. The subject of functional stuff for the home was brought up. Krenov used the kitchen cabinet as an example of leaving the design and building of such, to those that do it as a full time occupation and respect the craftspeople that do that for what they are capable of. He didn't look down his nose at domestic cabinet makers, he is not made like that. His only comments beyond the above on the subject was about the quality of workmanship should be the same for everything done by a craftsperson. My impression since those times till today is this. He has shown a WAY, not THE WAY but, a WAY of doing, of seeing wood and translating that into HIS VIEW of how a thing should be. He is not a god, he has feet of clay just as the rest of us. He can be cranky, standoffish and as the years mount the patience has deminished abit. All evidence of a human being albiet one with a VIEW of craftsmanship that is to be admired and if one WISHES, emulated. He is just following along a path that has had its travelers for a long long time. Wharton Esherick, Nakasima, Maloof, Krenov, the craftman of Kyoto in Japan.
PAX dave

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