Is there a Tool Opposite of Vice (Separator)?

Is there a tool, what is it called, that works the opposite of a vice. Something to put between two boards and apply some force outward to help separate them. I am thinking of space distances of a few inches to almost a foot if possible.
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http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberF807
They aren't very good (I.e. this exact one from HF doesn't hold (in either direction) with much pressure). I've seen the same made by other companies which are much better (read: useable). They come in as many different sizes as any bar clamps.
Ed
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And the trigger/handle breaks.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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You've used them, too? (grin)
One of those times where I looked and thought, how bad can a clamp be?
*That* bad.
Ed
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Yep. :-) They were like $2.50 a piece on sale months ago, so I figured what the heck.
Sooner or later, I'll take 'em back for store credit.
Or maybe I'll just buy new ones and take back the old, broken ones. :-p
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I just picked up some for $1.99 each. I figure for small, light-duty projects where all they have to do keep a little pressure on the parts while the glue dries they're worth two bucks. I wonder if their screw-clamps are any good, they put those on sale sometimes but they disappear pretty fast.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberH54
I got a set of these at HF recently and they've proven very useful, there are some decent items there in between the somewhat shoddy stuff.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber051
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> http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberH54 >
Those are decent with a little spray lube. Great thing about Harbor Freight is their return policy is inversely proportional to the quality of their tools. :-)

> > http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber051
That is the same exact package that Woodcraft sells for 10-12 bucks. I like mine. That plastic is stronger than it looks.
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I've only returned one item there and they gave me no hassles. Speaking of Woodcraft it was an item sold at both stores but significantly cheaper at HF. However I bought all the accessories at Woodcraft because they were closing them out and gave me a decent price. I hear a lot more of, "Let me see what I can do out-the-door" at Woodcraft these days.

Yeah, it looks like it would be stronger than it looks. ;~)
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says...

Same kind of tool: the Irwin Quick-Grip clamps. I've had some reversible ones as well for a few years now, and I am generally well pleased with them apart from the fact that the bars are not as rust-resistant as I would like and that I dropped one off the bench and the side-cover broke off. Other than that they've worked well as quick-clamps and also as spreaders in cabinet assembly occasionally.
Clamping is reasonably forceful, the plastic/grips have not broken yet (and I use them constantly) but I've managed to get the bars to flex when using them as a spreader. Careful use advised in that direction it seems.
Wouldn't dream of buying some cheap knock-offs. I paid about 10 times the price of the item you quoted, and no regrets :-D
-P.
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Not sure what application you had in mind, but many clamps permit turning the heads for outward pressure.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pC844&cat=1,43838
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Albert, Here you go: http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer/jhtml/detail.jhtml?prodId=IrwinProd300003 Kerry
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In article <e2baaa0a-b632-4388-9d7b-b245563c2503

Something like this?
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2010&cat=1,43456,43407
or
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pD908&cat=1,43838,47843
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Yes - they have hydrologic 'jaws of life' if you will. They are two flat and wide jaws that point down to a shallow v point. Then the pump is used to change the tip wider and wider.
Some bar clamps are reversible and will push outward as well - but you need an opening for it.
It is hard to visualize what you need this for and the application.
Martin
Albert wrote:

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If you look at some of the larger shop vices, some come with inserts on the jaw face that are screwed or riveted in.
This is so the jaws can be made of different materials to hold differnt types of work without damagging it.
You could make up a couple of plates that extend above the jaws but the wood pieces would have to be gapped considerably before the metal jaws would fit.
If you already have a gap, why not use progressively thicker wooden wedges?

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Newer Bessey K Bodies, Jorgensen Cabinet Masters Jet, Bessey Clones
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Albert wrote:

This reminds me of working at an oil refinery in my late teens. The rite of passage was to send the new kid to the tool crib and ask the crusty old guy behind the fence for a board stretcher. I grew up with a practical joker for a father so I got that one when I was about 11. So when it got to "go check out a board stretcher" at the refinery off I went. After dawdling around the bend a few minutes, I came back with a smile and said it was checked out. They used a chip/tag system, I knew the tag number for the guy who sent me, so I told everybody assembled that it was checked out under one of his chips and the tool crib guy really wanted it back.
hex -30-
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Albert wrote:

For the "almost a foot" range, I have a small bottle jack that'd probably do the job...
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Albert wrote:

Wedges and a hammer work.
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dadiOH
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another possible name for it, a "Device". ;~)
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I have some of the Irwin type clamps that can be reversed to act as a spreader. They have limitations as to pressure that you can exert with them and you will need to slide the rubber pads on opposite of the way the come new so as you're tightening/spreading the rubber feet don't push themselves off. (that was probably a lousy description for how the rubber pads that are supposed to be protecting your surface slip as you exert pressure.) Robb
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