Is hemlock a good wood or junk?


I have a tree that fell on my property. Its a 2ft diameter hemlock (evergreen, small needles, bark looks like a regular tree). Its been dead for about 3 years and have no idea if its infested with anything or not. Is it worth my trouble to get it milled up?
Thanks. Jeff
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It's resistant to rot and infestation, and is often used for exterior trim. I think its worth something. Do an online search and look for prices in your area:
http://www.woodfinder.com /
-jbb
On 27 Oct 2005 10:52:57 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

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Note that right and left coast varieties differ. http://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blehem.htm http://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blwhem.htm
Neither are considered more than moderately resistant in the heartwood, and are therefore used as structural lumber rather than trim.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Last year I had 5 new posts put in the basement of my ~150 year old barn/garage/workshop, and the builder used rough hemlock. Each is rough and 10 or so inches square, I think. I'm not sure what they go for new, but knowing a use for the wood might help you.
-John
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When I was growing up in Oregon, they cut lots of them that went straight to the papermill.
Steve
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Thanks to all that replied. It'll probably end up as firewood. I was hoping that on some off chance that it might be good for furniture. Oh welll, I do still have a hickory to use as boards... :-)
Thanks. Jeff
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Too soft for any kind of furniture. Good for construction lumber ONLY if it has been kiln dried.

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It is too soft for furniture, but it's also good for construction even if it's not been kiln dried. Hemlock dries quite hard as anyone who has tried to drive a nail into it after a few years knows.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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I'd be very surprised if it weren't insect infested and/or rotten if it's been down for three years... There is a lot of hemlock around here and from what I've seen, once it's on the ground it deteriorates quickly. This is a very different situation from milled lumber that is generally kept out of the weather, or painted and maintained, where hemlock is OK. It makes poor firewood--too soft and leaves a lot of creosote in the chimney.
John
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Here in the NW, hemlock is commonly used as baseboards & trim in tract houses, including the one I live in. It takes stain & lacquer well. It's similar in grain to fir but lighter in color, more yellow whereas fir is redder. Don't know about a tree that's been on the ground for 3 years though. Firewood is a good possibility.
Will

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Its been standing dead for 2 years and a storm blew it over. Even now, the branches have kept it off of the ground. It'll be a real bear to get it out though.
Jeff
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Hemlock has frequently been used for bridges due to it's strength and resistance to decay, once dried. When I rebuild my deck in a couple of years, I intend to use hemlock instead of cedar.
Ed

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Once again, you might want to read about the wood before you put it outdoors.
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Hemlock is poisonous, one of the old timer greek guys drank it to poisn himself.....
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scribbled:

The pine family trees found in North America and eastern Asia called hemlock (genus Tsuga) have no relation with the poisonous Eurasian herbs in the Carrot family (genera Conium & Cicuta).
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Woodworking
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I was just pulling your pisser, when we were kids we used hemlock stalks for pea shooters and haws for peas....mjh
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mike hide wrote:

Sometimes words have two meanings.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Yeah and that poisonous hemlock isn't a tree. And a Bee in a your bonnet may be in the engine compartment of your car and not on your head.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

It must be good. Socrates said it's to die for.
;-) Glen
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