inexpensive and workable hardwood

Page 1 of 3  
I'm building a built-in bookcase in my 1940s house. I'd like to use an inexpensive hardwood that is easy to work with but that will hold up well over time. To match the decor, I'll (unfortunately) be painting the bookcase so many of my usual considerations about color, grain, etc. aren't relevant here. What wood do people suggest using in this case? Thanks for any advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bob" wrote in message

Poplar.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 5/15/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed, with an additional comment.
Make any parts that are subject to lots of handling or abuse like doors, face frames that have doors attached, drawer fronts, kick plates, etc with maple. Maple will have a more solid feel and resist dings and other damage better than soft poplar.
Since you're painting it, you can mix the woods at will.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob wrote:

poplar. poplar. poplar.
:)
dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
He said he wanted to use a "hardwood"...isn't poplar a softwood?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Technically a Hard Wood. A soft hard wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

thanks for jumping in, Leon! :) it's soft enough that the for the rails of my second and third Delta mobile bases, I used maple. The first one, made from poplar, was a little less rigid than I'd hoped for, but due to the light duty I put it to, it's irrelevant.
dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Balsa is also a soft hardwood.
George

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

I will put this gently. You are new here? This was a troll, for no apparent reason, by people who should know better the replies are simply sycophantic extensions of the original "joke".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Old Nick wrote:

now THAT'S the first time I've been called sycophantic! I tend to use that term often, without being a participant in such behavior.
dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like balsa, poplar is a hardwood.
OTOH, Foug Fir and Southern Yellow Pine both softwoods, are both harder than poplar.
The defintions of hardwood and softwood are objective though abitrary in the sense that neither depends on the hardness of the wood:
If it had leaves on it when it was alive, it is a hardwood. If it had needles on it when it was alive it is a softrwood.
I suggest he not use balsa.
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6 Jul 2004 23:59:23 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

what about juniper? it's definitely a softwood, though it can be pretty hard and has neither leaves nor needles- though what it has is probably closer to leaves than needles....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote in message (Fred the Red

Juniperus Virginiana (sp?) is pretty soft, and brittle, and toxic, and beautiful. I haven't worked with any others.
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kind of depends on where you are. East, Midwest = poplar. West coast Alder. I love Alder.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 4 Jul 2004 18:29:56 -0700, "Pounds on Wood"
|Kind of depends on where you are. East, Midwest = poplar. West coast |Alder. I love Alder.
I'm using some Alder right now. I'm not sure I'm in love yet and even in AZ poplar is cheaper. Unpainted, it looks way nicer than poplar (what doesn't) but it sure doesn't like dull tools.
Wes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you're going to paint it, what about plywood with edge banding?
djb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4 Jul 2004 17:10:27 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Bob) wrote:

To reiterate:
The answer for painted projects is poplar. It is very easy to work, is stable, and takes paint well.
The Mona Lisa was painted on poplar. http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Mona_Lisa
It has held up OK.
Paul.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Bob) wrote:

But that's Lombardy Poplar. <G> And the cite you gave says it's deteriorating pretty fast.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And thus, the problem between "tulip" and real poplar again. Real poplar would work as well, but it is going to be fuzzier requiring one more sand-down.
Depending on location, different woods will be available. I'd use bass or aspen (Poplar) both of which barely return the cost of sawing up here, and both of which work and take paint well, though aspen can do some moving if you're ripping boards.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In the same vein, Aspen isn't real Poplar either. Real Poplar, Aspen and Cottonwood can look quite a bit alike both on the stump and by the board. I think Cottonwood is fuzzy too, though the name comes form the cottony fluff that forms when it 'flowers' not the fibrousness of the wood.
The north American tulip tree is more closely related to magnolia than to poplar and the one magnolia log I have seen looked a lot like poplar (tulip).
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.